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Full text of "Coast Seamen's Journal (Sept.15,1915-Sept.6,1916)"

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INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-NINE 

SEPTEMBER 15, 1915— SEPTEMBER 6, 1916 



All editorial matter is designated by an as- 
terisk (*). 

Title No. Page 
A 

Able Seamen Certificates (See Interna- 
tional Seamen's Union of America) 

Accidents at Sea * 23 6 

Actors Join A. F. of L 40 2 

Alarm Bell for Light Keepers 18 9 

Alaska Placer Mining 18 10 

Alaska, Agriculture in 36 10 

Alaska Fishermen's Union Death List.. 18 11 

Alaska, Glacier Retreats 48 9 

Alaska, New Wall Map 34 9 

Alaskan Waters, Survey in 25-9 29 11 

Alaska's Best Year 18 9 

Albania 50 11 

Alcohol, Absorption of 1 9 

Algeria 49 9 

Aluminum from Greenland 9 9 

Aluminum, Use of 32 2 

American Cossack, The 40 1 

American Federation of Labor — 

A. F. of L., Welcome to San Fran- 
cisco * 8 6 

Thirty-fifth Annual Convention, Ex- 
ecutive Council's Report 9 1 

Fraternal Delegate Amnion's Address 10 1 

Office Building, Work Commenced on 10 13 

A. F. of L. Stands by Seamen 11 1 

British Fraternal Delegates Address 
Sailors' Union Meeting at San Fran- 
cisco 11 • 7 

Resolutions Against Ship Subsidies... 12 1 
Japanese Delegate to A. F. of L. Goes 

Home 15 6 

The Thirty-fifth Annual Convention * 12 6 

Appeal for Danbury Hatters 16 1 

Citizen Soldiery Theory Endorsed... 19 3 

Licensed Men Join A. F. of L. * . . . . 21 7 

Decisions by Executive Council 27 3 

A. F. of L. Office Building Dedi- 
cated * 44 6 

English L T nionists Attend Dedication 

of Office Building 46 3 

Sherman (U. S. Senator) Attacks 

Gompers 52 10 

"American Ideals?" What Are 52 8 

"Americanization" and Labor 36 1 

Americanization, Real 16 11 

Americanism, What Is It? (by Con- 
gressman Frank Buchanan ) 42 9 

American Prosperity * 22 6 

"Amyrel of the Se" 43 2 

Another Ivy Lee? * 8 6 

Ancient Sea, An 17 2 

Antiquated Navigation Laws 26 1 

Antofagasta's Water Supply 52 9 

Arbitration, Compulsory, Etc. — 

Compulsory Arbitration Victimizes 

New Zealand Workers 14 3 

New South Wales, Fines Under Com- 
pulsory Arbitration * 32 6 

Industrial Disputes Laws 33 8 

Archangel, Shipping at 41 2 

Arctic Explorations by Stefansson 52 8 

Arizona Bars Gun Men 15 3 

Arizona Copper Strike Ends 25 10 

Arizona's Executive Praised 52 3 

Armed Merchant Vessels 35 11 

Armed Merchantmen 46 8 

Ascension Island 12 11 

Asiatics, Exclusion, Etc. — 

tabor Movement in Japan (by K. K. 

Kawakami) 1 11 

Japan's Monopoly 2 9 



Title No. Page 

"Made In Japan" * 5 6 

Shipowning in Japan 5 9 

Japanese Lessees, About (by Win. T. 

Bonsor) 7 9 

Cheap Asiatic Labor 12 11 

Naturalization for Japanese * 13 6 

Japanese Women Pearl Divers 13 11 

Japanese Whaling Companies 17 8 

White vs. Chinese Seamen's Wages... 19 1 

Japanese Desertions * 22 6 

Coolie Labor Increasing on Vancouver 

Island 27 9 

Lascar Crews * 26 6 

"Yellow Oil" (Smuggling of Chinese) 29 10 

Japanese is Denied Naturalization.... 33 2 

Ultimatums, Too Many from Japan * 33 6 

Japan and Holland 33 11 

White vs. Chinese Seamen * 35 6 

Progress in Japan 35 8 

As Others See Us (Japanese View of 

American Trade-Unionists) * 37 6 

Female Workers in Japan 41 8 

Racial Origin of Japanese 45 8 

Why Japs Are Favored by California 

Employers 48 10 

Japanese Merchant Ships 50 8 

China's Population 50 11 

Japanese Seamen Demand Increase * 51 6 

Filipinos Succeed Chinese 52 9 

Astor, The Baron 18-8; 23 11 

Atlantic Coast (Notes from the Firine 

Line *) ." 35 6 

Australian Seamen, Etc. — 

Fisheries of New South Wales 8 8 

Australian Workers Oppose Conscrip- 
tion 8 8 

Australian Seamen's Law (Compari- 
son) t 14 1 

Australian Seamen's Wages 25 7 

Sam Smith (Australian) Death of.... 27 7 

Pumpkin Path, The (by E. H. Boote) 29 8 

Sydney Mutiny, The 32 7 

Australian View of American War 

Profits 39 8 

Australian Judge Defends Free Speech 41 3 

Labor -in New Zealand 42 2 

Sydney (N. S. W.) Adopts Single Tax 46 15 
Universal Compulsory Military Train- 
ing in Australia (Home Defense *) 47 6 
Australia's Government-Owned Ships... 51 7 

B 

Baby and the War 25 8 

Bargain Counter Patriots * 14 7 

Battles of To-morrow, The * 19 7 

Bee is Humming, The * 40 6 

Belgian Congo 22 2 

Belligerent Donkeyman, A 42 8 

Bermuda, Passenger Traffic to 52 14 

Big Business, Is It Patriotic? 35 1 

Birds in California 9 8 

Bird Protection 1 2 

Boycott, About the 47 11 

Bird Protection Treaty, Signed Be- 
tween U. S. and Great Britain ... ?2 13 

Blindness in the World 26 8 

Botha (General) and Labor 27 9 

" Bounty, A Due Share of the" * 29 6 

Boycotts, About * 28 <> 

Brandeis, The Opposition to 26-8; 32 6* 

Bratuleis Nomination Confirmed * 39 7 

Brazil. Fisheries of 39 9 

British Labor Triple Alliance 40 2 

British Merchant Marine 40 9 S 

British Seamen Confer * 8 f> 

British Shipbuilding 9 ')■' 



Ti,le Xn. Page 

Bryan's Censored Booklet on India.... 13 7 

Buchanan Indictment Unjust * 38 fj 

Buckos, A Pair of 31 6 

Buffalo, Return of the 31 H 

Burdens Borne by Labor (by Robert 

Hunter) 3 \i 

Buryeson, F. H., Articles by — 

Treasure Trove! 15 8 

A Weird Pact 19 8 

On a Lee Shore 24 8 

Getting Moses' Goat 28 8 

"Mephityxomopedioides" 32 8 

Astonishing the Natives 37 8 

C 

California Immigration Commission's 

Work 36 2 

California Coal 5 2 

California Lumber Industry 30 2 

California's Mineral Springs 13 9 

California Public Employment Bureau.. 36 12 

California Salt Production 20 13 

California Railroad Commission, Attitude 

on Wage Raising 34 7 

Canadian Problems * 48 7 

Canadian Shipowners Forcing the Is- 
sue * 34 6 

Cape Verde Packets 52 9 

Canadian Workers Alert * 3 7 

Capital and Labor (by Bernard Shaw).. 13 8 

Capital and Patriotism * 42 6 

Capital's Shipping Policy * 23 6 

Cargo, Dangerous 10 11- 

Carnegie, Andrew, "Patriot" (by Clyde 

H. Tavenner) 12 8 

Cave Man's Creed, The 4 9 

Certificated Able Seamen (see Interna- 
tional Seamen's Union of America) 

Certificated Able Seamen (in England).. 20 11 

Ceylon, Riots in 50 9 

Ceylon, The Siren of 52 11 

Children, Large Earnings of 41 3 

Chamberlain Corrects Dollar 3 2 

Chameleon Warships 17 2 

Cheapness, The Crime of 16 10 

Chicago Teachers' Union, The (by J. L. 

Engdahl) 2 8 

Children, Nobody's 21 9 

China Coast Officers Strike 36 11 

Chinese (see Asiatics) 

Christmas Tidings * 15 6 

Church and Labor (see Methodists) 
Cigar Girls Maltreated (Detroit Fac- 
tories) 52 3 

Citizenship, Dual 29 7 

Citizens of the World 20 11 

Class Conscious Merchants * 27 6 

Coal in California 51 8 

Coal Miners Victorious 36 9 

Collective Action 39 11 

Colorado. Facts About 47-8; 48 

Commercial Referendums * 37 6 

Commerce and Conscription 13 9 

Communism, Successful -14 9 

Compasses in Lifeboats 52 8 

Concentrated Heal Wealth * 7 6 

Compensation (see Workmen's Compi 

sation) 
Conflict, The Impending (by Scott 

Ncaring) 6 2 

Conflict. The Unceasing 45 

Congo, Belgian 22 

Copper Miners Win * 23 6 

ConscriptiqsL (see, Pseparedness) 
1 i-ii\'iiu' {Jiifna&j :'.if' . 51 

rt/uctitfe' '1 : 1 1 1 1 : t . . 45 8 



COAST SEAMEN'S fOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-NINE 



Title No. Page 

Court Decisions, Maritime, Labor, Etc. — 

J Contract Sustained 1-2; 50 8 

Attorney-General's Opinion on Section 

14 of Seamen's Act 2 7 

Seaman Awarded Damages ("Gov- 
ernor") 7 7 

Able Seamen on Foreign Ships (Dept. 

Ruling) 15 2 

Seamen's Act Ruling-. 17 9 

Pay for Waiting Period * ("Stanley 

Dollar") '. 24 7 

"A B's" "ii Foreign Vessels * (De- 
partment Rulings) 25 6 

Interned Seamen's Wages (British)*.. 26 6 

Status of Alien Seamen 32 10 

Strange Contract Upheld 33 2 

l.ifeboatmen on Foreign Ships (De- 
partment Ruling) 43 11 

Section 20 of Seamen's Act Upheld. 44 8 

"Slipping on Orange Peel'" 44 11 

Direct Legislation Crippled by 

Washington Supreme Court 50 10 

Courts, Respect for the 49 6 

Cossacks for New York 32 10 

Crews, Nationality of * 30 6 

"Criminal Conspiracy" (by Fred 11. 

Moore) 5 9 

Criminal Neglect? 40 9 

Criticism of the Courts (by A. A. Gra- 
ham) " 13 2 

Criticism Unjust * 9 7 

Cypress, Island of 21 11 



Dangerous Classes, The 4 8 

Daniels ( Sec'y. of Navy) Strikes Back.. 34 11 

Danish Marine Insurance V 15 

Danish Island in the West Indies 50 7 

"Daj Laborer" The * 52 7 

Denmark and the Danes 35 7 

Denmark's New Constitution 41 11 

Derelicts, On the Trail of 33 7 

Desertions by Japanese * 22 6 

De Young — The Knave * 8 7 

Discontent a Crime in Alabama 48 3 

Discrimination Against Foreign-born 

Citizens (Military Tangles *) 35 7 

Dissecting the Shipping Ring 51 7 

Dollar Decoration. A * 2 6 

Dollar's Stale Jokes * \1 7 

Dollar's (Captain) Obsession * 17 7 

"Dollar" lectures. The * 26 6 

Dollar's Game of "Make Believe" * 28 6 

"Dollar," A British * 31 6 

Double Standard, The (by John H. 

Walker) 42 11 

Dred Scott Decision, The (by Arthur 

I.e Seur) 

"Dry Wave." The 

Dual Citizenship 

Dublin 

Dues, High. Means Progress 



34 


8 


17 


10 


29 


7 


4.S 


11 


20 


3 



Earth and Mankind 38 11 

"Eastland" Disaster (see Wrecks) 

Economic Growth, Our 26 9 

Economic Power Dominates 10 3 

Economics, Topsy-Turvy 30 2 

Second 36 9 

Effects of Unionism, The 42 2 

Eight-Hour Workday, For an 27 8 

Elect Labor Congressmen 45 8 

Electrical Age is Next 13 3 

Eminently Appropriate (Thornwall Mul- 

lally, Grand Marshal) * 42 6 

Employment Bureaus. Free 28 7 

In forcing the Law * 29 6 

English Words, Number of 35 8 

"Enlisting" the Unemployed * 35 7 

Environment and Race 52 11 

Equalizing the Wage Cost 19-7: 24-1 

Ericsson, John, Builder of "Monitor," 

to Receive Honor * 49 7 

Eshleman, John M., Death of * 25 6 

Evolution 43 8 

Expert "Figurer," The * 9 6 

Exploiters Blamed for Mexico's Trou- 
bles 42 3 

Exploiters Boost Preparedness 17 1 

' : Your 10 11 



Fair Reward for Service, A * 41 7 

Farmers Against Subsidy 27 9 

Farmers on the Right Tack * 19 6 

Federal Employes Organize 39 9 

Feeding on False Hopes * 12 7 

Feudalism in Texas 11 9 

Filibusters and Financers 44 11 

Fisheries, Etc. — 

Sea and I ts Riches. The 4 7 

Fisheries Service Bulletin 4 9 

Herring Fisheries, The 5 8 

Pacific Salmon on Atlantic 8 2 

Mew South Wales Fisheries 8 8 

Whaling Companies (Japanese) 17 8 

Fish Destroy Mosquitoes 18 2 

Vnnual Report on Fisheries 18 8 

Alaska Fishermen's Death List 18 11 

Codfishermen Organizing * 19 6 

Codfishermen, Notice to 20 2 

British Columbia Herring 20 

Codfishermen. Attention ?■:,•:. :*:.;: • i r*j>4 : (t. 
Codfishermen's Strike*-"»N«>fjte •"•.*,./.! 1 2o I Jh' 
hermen's Victory," Ylic' *."..".. .'2ft'" *6 
2$.. .lp 



Codfisl: 

Codfishermen's Agreement 



Title No. Page 

Codfishermen's Agreement, The 30 7 

Sealing Industry on Pacific Coast.... 33 5 

Tuna-Packing at San Pedro 36 5 

Fishermen, Nationality of, in Cal. . . . 36 10 

Fisheries of Brazil 39 9 

Sea Otter, Hunting the (by Chas. 

Littlejohn) 40 8 

Alaska Fishing Industry in 1915 42 5 

Fisheries on Films 42 11 

Danish Fish Refrigeration 43 9 

Modern Fish Distribution 46 8 

Seattle Deep Sea Fishermen's Rules.. 46 11 

Alaska Cod 47 9 

"Some Catch" (at San Pedro) 51 9 

Flag As An Asset, The 2 11 

Flogging in Delaware 22 13 

Florida Industry, A Promising 22 9 

Fog Prevention, With Oil 23 9 

Food You Should Eat 35 2 

Ford and Suhr, No Pardon for * 1 (> 

Fourteen- Versus Sixteen-Inch Guns.... 45 2 

Foreigner, The Ignorant 30 10 

Foreign Landlords in the United States 35 8 

France. Foreign Trade of 36 15 

"Freedom," A Raid on 43 11 

"Freedom of the Seas" 41 11 

"Free Ports" Wanted 18 11 

Free Press, Need of 46 9 

Free the Land, To 20 1 

Free Speech Defended by Australian 

Judge 41 3 

Freights, Increase in 35 9 

French Hindustan Colonies 39 9 

French Workers Want Peace 3 8 

Frigates, Our First 13 11 

"Frightfulness" 38 9 

Fundamental Preparedness 39 7 

Furuseth, Andrew, Articles by. Etc. — 

The Dawn of Another Day 2 1 

The Future of Furuseth * 12 6 

Equalization Explained 19 7 

Our Merchant Marine (Address before 

Economic Club of Bostonl 24 1 

Preparedness and Coolie Crews 30 1 

The U. S. Naval Reserve 32 1 

Construing the Seamen's Act (Sec- 
tion 6) 38 1 



German Fishermen's War Wages 3 9 

German Raiders Work ("Moewe") 

.22-15; 25-7. 11; 27-15; 38-8 

German Shipbuilding 49 9 

German Ships in Chile 32 15 

German Socialists, The 27 2 

German Submarine "Deutschland" 
Crosses Atlantic (From 1833 to 

1916)* 44 6 

German Submarine "Deutschland" Re- 
turns to Bremen 

German Submarines Building 

Gold Dredging in California 

Government Aid to Shipping 

Governments Iwned Ships 23 

"Grandfather Said It" 



Great Lakes. — 

Great Lakes Shipping 

Lake Seamen's Agreements Signed 

up * 

Lakes Passenger Steamship Interests 

Want Seamen's Law Modified 

Greatest Thing in the World 

Greece, Hard Times in 

Guidance, A Rule for 

Gunmen (Industrial) Must Go 

H 

Hardie, Jas. Keir, Death of 

Hawaii, Labor Condition- in 

Hawaiian Dictionary. The 

Hawaiian Volcanoes 

Hayes, Max, A Nervy Critic * 

Heard on the Water-Front (by a San 

Pedro Yarn-spinner) 

7-2; 8-2; 9-9; 10- 

Hearst Ranch (see Mexican-U. S. Con- 

trovery) 

Hearst — The Slanderer * 

He That Jokes Confesses * 

High Dues Means Progress 

Hold-Up Game-. About * 

Home Defense * (Compulsory Military 

Training) 

Home-Owning Farmers Decreasing 

Homes (Model) Planned 

Houston Shi]) Channel 

Hughe- Tile Injunction Judge 

Hud-on's Bav Company, The 

Humphrey, Congressman 4-11; ; 

"Hyphenates," Those * 



Ignorance. Tragedy of. 
Ignorant Blacks * 

Immigration, Etc. — 



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34 


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California Immigration Commission's 

Work 36 

Illiteracy Reduced 5 8 

Illiterate Aliens Increasing in United 

Slate- 52 3 

Immigrants in California 36 2 

Immigrants. Wanted More 31 2 

I mmigration Figures 

8-10; 11-3; 17-3; 28-10; 36-3; 42-10; 48-11; 52-3 
Immigration Problems (Recommenda- 
tion by A. Caminetti) 20 7 



Title >jo. 

Immigration Restriction * 31 

Imprisonment for Desertion * 46 

Imprisonment Without Trial * 27 

lncas Had No Slums 16 

Income Tax, An Early 36 

Income Tax Law Upheld 23 

India Abolishes Indentured Emigration 39 

India, Bryan's Book on 13 

Indians in Mexico 47 

Indians in the United States 18 

Industrial Relations, Report of Commis- 
sion on 1 

Industrial Relations Day * 20 

Industrial Relations Commission's Report 

Ordered Printed 36 

Industrial Training, Aid for 26 

Industrial Tyranny 30 

Injunctions, Government by, Etc. — 

Injunction Judges Deny Free Speech. 30 
What Labor Expects From the Courts 32 

Injunction Judge Makes Record 41 

Government by Injunction 42 

Free Speech Rights Flouted by Court 46 

How Labor Injunctions Started 47 

Labor and the Courts (Mass. Su- 
preme Court Decision ) 49 

Respect for the Courts * 49 

Hughes, Record as Injunction Judge.. 50 
Clayton Law Approved by L'nter- 

myer 51 

Inspiring Others 16 

Insurance Against Air Craft 5 

International Seamen's Union of America — 

Seamen's Act Rulings (see Court De- 
cisions.) 
Mass Meeting at San Francisco to 

I >iscuss Seamen's Act 1 

Language Test, The * 1 

S.S. "China" Language Test (see Lan- 
guage Test.) 

Able Seamen Certificates * 1 

Local Objectors to Seamen's Act An- 
swered 3 

Seattle, Mass Meeting at 3 

"Our Flag" Again * 3 

Departmental Regulations on Seamen's 

Act 5 

Pacific Mail Again 6 

Pacific Mail Exposed 7 

Seamen's Law Takes Effect 8 

Able Seamen Certificates * 8 

Seamen's Law In Effect * 9 

Schwerin Talked Too Much 9 

Physical Examination, The * 10 

Kruttschnitt Explains * 10 

Pictorial History of Seamen's Legisla- 
tive Struggle * 11 

Safety, A Place of *..... 11 

Comparison of Australian- \mcrican 

Seamen's Laws 14 

Plain Talk on Seamen's Law (by Cap- 
tain Ira Harris) 14 

Seamen's Law — Real Preparedness.... 16 
Contradictory Newspaper Interviews.. 18 

Figures Can't Lie, But — * 19 

Licensed Men Protest Against Modi- 
fication of Seamen's Act 21 

Comparison, A 'Timely * (Navigation 

Laws) 22 

Secretary Hanson's Report 24 

Referendum on Seamen's Act Exposed 

(by Jack Rosen) 26 

Seamen's Bill, "'That Immoral" 27 

A Professor on the Seamen'- Act (Ad- 
dress by Henry W. Farnani) 29-1; 

Seamen's Act, Unjust Criticism of the 39 
Able-Seaman Certificates Issued to 

May 1, 1916 40 

Bur-ting the Rubble * (Pacific Mail 
Withdrawal) 51 

Interested Patriotism 40 

Interned Ships. Status of * 39 

Ionian Islands, The 23 

Irish Emigration 25 

Iron Ore Near Nome 16 

Islands in Sea of Lava 21 

Iowa Defeats Women Suffrage 42 

Ireland, 'The Martyrs of * 36 

Irish Rebellion 34 

Islands in the Aegean 12 

It Is to Laugh * 2 

I. W. W. Highbrow, The * 5 

I. W. W. Obituary * 6 

J-K 

Japanese (see Asiatic-). 

Johnson, Hiram \\ '., Governor of Cal.. 

Nominated for U. S. Senate * 52 

Jurisdiction Disputes are Inevitable ... . 20 

Jurisdiction Issue an Old Problem 18 

Justice' 44 

Kaiser's Contribution to Australian Mer- 
chant Marine 31 

Kansas. Wages in 45 

Keir Hardie, Homage to 9 

Kirbv, las.. Death of 7 

L 

Label Taker Convicted 4° 

Labor Against Ship Subsidies 12 

Labor and Americanization 36 

Labor and the Methodists 

38-13; 39-6 *; 40 

Labor Conditions in Hawaii 51 

Labor Day of 1916 * 52 

Labor Group in Congress, The 38 



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COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-NINE 



40 



Title No. 

Labor in France 45 

Labor Must be Watchful (by John M. 

O'Neil) 47 

Labor's New Allies (Committee on In- 
dustrial Relations) 12 

Labor Problem, An Upside Down 7 

Labor Wealth and Efficiency 42 

Labor's World Peace Congress * 30 

Labor Unrest, Causes of 1 

La Follette At The Helm * 7 

La Follette's Victory in Wisconsin 

34-13; 35-2; 

Land and Labor 24-3; 

Landlordism the Cause of War (by 
Walter Macarthur) 10 

Language Test on S. S. China — 

Certified Chinamen * 17 

The S. S. "China's" Crew * 18 

Report on Language Test on S.S 

"China" 18 

That Farcial Language Test * 21 

Affidavits About "China" Language 

Test 21 

A "Humane" Examination * 28 

"Law and Order" in San Francisco 52 

Laws and More Laws 14 

Lawson Case, The 4 

Learned Slaves * 21 

Learning from Our Betters 7 

Lest We Forget * 10 

Libau, Port of 27 

"Liberty" in Pittsburgh 41 

Lifeboatmen (see International Seamen's 
Union of America). 

Lifeboats, Compasses in 52 

Life Buoy Requirement 31 

Limiting Working Hours by Law 41 

Lisbon < 51 

Lloyds, Origin of 47 

Lloyds Register Report 12 

Load Lines and Bulkheads * 51 

"Longshoremen, The" (Book Review).. 21 
Longshoremen's Strike * (Pacihc Coast) 

39-6, 7; 40-7; 

41-6, 7; 42-6, 7; 45-6; 46-7; 47-7; 49-6; 
Longshoremen's Strike, "Credit Where 
Credit Is Due," * (Resolution of 
Appreciation for Henry M. White 

and Wm. B. Wilson) 51 

Losses in Shipping Due to War ... .31-14; 

Low Wages vs. Traditions * 27 

"Lusitania" Lesson, A i 28 

M 

Macarthur's "Handbook" * 33 

"Made to Order" Statistics..., 31 

Magnesia in Sea Shells 14 

Malmo and Surroundings 23 

Man,' Isle of, The 38 

Marine Firemen, Duties of 48 

Member. The Unruly 33 

Merchant vs. Naval Seamen 32 

Merely A Sailor * 21 

Methodists and Labor 

38-13; 39-6 *; 40-7 *; 

Methodists, Taking Their Rightful Place 50 

Mexican-U. S. Controversy — 

Mexican Situation, The * 28 

Mexican-U. S. Border Raid 28 

Mexico, "Our Rights" In * 39 

Intervention in Mexico, Who Wants 

It? 39 

Labor Conference With Mexicans Sug- 
gested 40 

National Guard Ordered to Mexican 

Border 41 

Mexican Embroglio, The * 43 

An Auspicious Conference * 44 

The Great Pact 44 

Mexican Workers Interviewed 45 

An Epoch Making Call 46 

Why Hearst Wants War With 

Mexico 47 

Hearst and His Ranch 48 

The Hearst Ranch Again 49 



of. 



Page 
9 



11 

8 
7 
2 

6 



Mexico, Inhabitants 

"Might Is Right!" *.. .... 11 

Migratory Laborers 39 

Migratory Workers, The 20 

Militarism (see Preparedness). 

Millions for Publicity 26 

"Millions In It" (new inventions) 47 

Miners Won't Amalgamate 23 

Minimum Cost of Living for Family... 30 

Minnesota Mystery, The * 15 

M issing Ships 6 

Missouri River, The 28 

M olokai, The Leper Island . . .• 22 

Monopoly — The Common Enemy 1 

Morgan's Conscience Z6 

Mules and Men 51 

Mysterv, Plenty of * ("Appam" Ex- 
ploit) 25 

N 

Nasty Mind, The 42 

National Honor 32 

Nationality of Crews * 30 

Nationality of Seamen * 41 

Naturalization Denied to Japanese 33 

Naturalization for Japanese? * 13 

Nautical Almanach 21 

Navigation Laws, Antiquated (letter by 

E. T. Chamberlain) 26 

Navigation Laws, Handbook of * 33 

Naval vs. ^Merchant Seamen * 24 

Navy, United States (see United States) 

Navy, A "Peaceful" 40 



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Title No. Page 

Navy League Gets Pertinent Suggestion 14 9 
Navy League Unmasked (by Clyde H. 

Tavenner) 22 8 

Navy Secretary Defended 34 11 

Navy Yard Work * 27 6 

Nebraska Once a Sea Floor 29 11 

New York City Budget 10 13 

New York Garment Workers Win 50 10 

New York Harbor Police 24 11 

Nitrate, Increase in Value 47 14 

Nobody's Children 21 9 

Norway (Historic) 17 11 

Norway Prosperous 13 9 

Norway's Shipping Losses 29 8 

Norway, Water Highway of 50 2 

Norwegian Fisheries 38 8 

Norwegians Lose Steamer (British 

Prize Court Decision) 49 8 

Norwegian Seamen Confer * 7 7 

O 

"Obliquity of Vision," An * 15 6 

Officers, Training Young * 26 6 

Oil Versus Coal 6 8 

Old Age 5 10 

Old Age Pension Bill Introduced by 

Congressman Nolan 44 13 

Old Glory to Fly on Pacific 47 10 

Oldest Living Thing, The 39 8 

"On With the Dance" (by Walter 

Thomas Mills) 45 2 

Open Shop — Definition of 51 1 

Open-Shop Fight in San Francisco 

(see San Francis.co). 

Opium Trade in India 4 15 

Optical Illusion, An * 11 6 

Oregon Coal 26 2 

Oregon Land Plan up to Voters 48 3 

Organization, The Rising Tide of 34 3 

Origin of Gold and Silver 36 9 

Our Heritage — The Sea 23 7 

"Our Sailormen" * 47 7 

P 

Pacific Mail Withdrawal (Telling the 

Truth*) 24 6 

Pacific Mail Finances (Truth Leaks 

Out*) 28 7 

Pacific Mail Finances 42 5 

Panama Canal — 

Panama Canal. The * 6 7 

Panama Canal Slides 7 8 

Panama Canal Opened Temporarily.. 18 5 

Panama Canal, Cost of 18 9 

Panama Canal Reopened on April 15.. 35 2 

Panama Canal Tolls 38 5 

Ships Which Freely Use the Canal.... 41 2 

Papers Found in a Shark 14 8 

Passengers Arrived at New York in 1915 22 13 

Passports for Seamen 40 7 

Patriot Wants to Know, A * 26 7 

Patriotism and Profit 29 9 

Pauperism, Causes of 34 2 

Pearl Harbor, Progress in Work at.... 48 5 

Pellagra Cured by Good Food 12 10 

Penny Economy 31 9 

Tension of Packers a Snare 51 10 

Perkins, Geo. W., Gone Wrong 13 1 

Periscope Finder, A 22 11 

"Persia," Going Down With the 30 11 

Petroleum Products of 1915 19 10 

Philanthropy, The Perils of (bv Frank 

P. Walsh) 5 1 

Physical Examination of Seamen (see 
International Seamen's L T nion of 
America). 
Physical Examination of Workers (by 

John B. Andrews) 21 1 

Physical Test, The * 14 6 

Pierced by the Truth * 23 7 

Pittsburgh Strikers, The 37 7 

Plan for Universal Peace 49 10 

Platform Pledges * 41 6 

Poetry — 

The Judas (by Reginald Wright Kauf- 
man) 3 8 

The Ballad of Bethlehem Steel (by 

Grace Isabel Colbron) 15 11 

Puget Sound Steamshipmen (by 

Richard Dean) 24 11 

Preparedness (American Teacher) 39 9 

Derelict (by Young E. Allison) 42 9 

Said The Sea (by R. J. Cassidy) 47 

Pontifical Flag, The 42 8 

"Poor Man's Paradise," A 34 8 

Population of New York 4 13 

Porto Rico Wretchedness 48 3 

Porto Ricans, Plight of 10 10 

Postal Savings Deposits 43 9 

Postal Savings, Growth of 17 13 

Postoffice Men Fined for Resigning ... . 23 3 

Potash from Seaweed 44 2 

Poverty and Tuberculosis 44 8 

Poverty Items (Profits Made by Ship- 
owners) 12 9 

Preparedness, Militarism, Conscription, 
Etc.— 

Preparedness, Cost of (by C. II. 

Tavenner) 1 

"Preparedness" * 16 6 

Conscription Not Wanted * 16 6 

"Preparedness" Boosted bv Exploiters 17 1 
Citizen Soldierv Theory Endorsed by 

A. F. of 1 1° 3 

State Militiamen, The * 20 6 

Conscription, Two Kinds of 20 8 



Titl e No. Page 

Preparedness, Relative Cost of * (an 

Eye-Opener) 23 6 

Labor Leaders and the Militia * 24 6 

Paying for Preparedness (by Clyde H. 

Tavenner) 25 8 

Militarism vs. Preparedness (by 

Samuel Gompers) 28 

Preparedness and Coolie Crews 30 

Preparedness, Comment on * 30 

Navy Secretary Strikes Back 34 

Military Tangles * 35 

Militia or Cossack? 35 

Military Boosters Repudiated * 37 

Preparedness, Truth About 37 

Preparedness Parades * 38 

Preparedness and Company 38 

The American Cossack 40 

Conscription in New York 40 

Preparedness (by Charles Erskine 

Scott Wood) 41 

Conscription, Beware of 43 

Peace Meeting, a Great, at San Fran- 
cisco 46 

Military Training, Compulsory; (Home 

Defense *) 47 

Those Training Camps 48 

Prince Rupert, B. C 25 

Professor on Politics, a 5 

Profits Out of War 3 

"Profit Sharing" a Failure 39 

Prohibition, About * 17 

Proletariat, Meaning of 39 

Proper Running-Mates * 33 

Property Philosophy (by Scott Nearing) 9 

Proportional Patriotism 51 

Prosperity, What Is? * 14 

Prussian Franchise, The 51 

Public School, Saviors of 2 

Puget Sound Steamshipmen Gaining.. 36 

Punishing "Deserters" * 42 

Pussyfooting! 32 

Putting It Straight (Views of Frank P. 
Walsh) 20 



1 
1 
6 

11 
7 
8 
6 

11 
6 
7 
1 

11 

9 
2 



6 
8 
9 

11 

11 
3 
6 

10 
7 
8 

11 
6 
2 
8 
8 
6 

11 



31 


11 


52 


11 


37 


11 


38 


10 


7 


9 


46 


10 


52 


6 


34 


7 


12 


2 


40 


11 


46 


14 



Q-R 

Queen Elizabeth's Navy 22 

Queer Procedure, A (U. S. Seamen in 

Australian Court) 

Race and Environment 

Races, Concerning 

Radicalism, What Is It? 

Radio Stations In the U. S 

Railroads, Who Owns the 

Railroads and Waterways * 

Rates vs. Wages (Cal. Railroad Com- 
mission) 

Reasonable Wages 

Record Tow, A (New York to Shanghai) 

Record Wheat Discharges 

Redondo, Cal., Lumber Discharged in 

1915 25 5 

Referendum, A Fake (On Seamen's 

Act) * 22 7 

Respect for the Courts * 49 6 

"Roanoke" Disaster (See wrecks) 

Rockefeller's Partners * 3 7 

Rockefeller Organizes Own Union 6 3 

Rockefeller's LTnion! 6 7 

Rockefeller Pleads Ignorance 48 7 

Rockefeller "L T nion" Discarded by 

Miners 50 

Roosevelt, the Fallen Idol 42 

Royal Marriage Market, The 7 

Ruled by the Dead ..: 17 

Rum in the Army 9 

Rum and Mahogany 41 

Running a Paper 15 

Russian Autocracy at Bay 8 



3 

2 
11 

8 
11 
11 
10 

8 



11 

6 
2 



Sacramento River Reclamation Work... 27 

"Sacredness of Contract" 17 

Safety vs. Dividends * 28 6 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific — 

Delegates' Report (Cal. State Federa- 
tion of Labor) 5 

Thirty-First Birthday * 25 

Thirty-First Anniversary, The 26 

Referendum Vote on New Wage 

Schedule and Working Rules 31 

The New Wage Schedules * 32 6 

Wage Negotiations, The * 33 6 

Pacific Coast Seamen Win ! 34 1 

A Happy May Day * 34 6 

New Wage Schedule Conceded 34 

British Columbia Shipowners Make 

Concessions * 38 7 

Amendment to Increase Dues From 
75c to $1.00 Carried by Referendum 

Vote 44 7 

Deceased Members (See List) 

DECK VSI'l) MEMBERS. 

Alander, J. 14 7 

Andersen, Kngcll 22 

\.ndersen, George Charles 40 7 

\nderson, fohan Olaf 17 

Backman, Peter W 

Berg, Michael 28 

Bergstrom, W. I . . 1 

Bcrgstrom, Carl Eric 39 

Bodine, Geo. C 33 

Boyard, Chas. Karl 38 

Bruce, Robert 

Bryndahl, 1 lenry 

BurgeSS. Albert 49 7 

Campbell, George 

Carlson, Otto Wilhelm 47 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-NINE 



Title No. Page 

■ i h 5 ' 7 

Dinkier, Fred 38 7 

Day. Henry 33 

Day, William 7 7 

Emanuelsen, Christian 19 7 

Erickson, S. S 31 7 

Erickson, Joseph 38 7 

Frickson, Conrad 9 7 

Gederbouer, Henry 23 7 

Granqvist, O. A ... 13 7 

Gregory, C. J 16 7 

Green, Chas. I 38 7 

Hagerlund, William 1! ' . . . J8 7 

Hansen, Hans 14 7 

Hansen, H. C : 30 7 

Hansen, S 38 7 

Hauge, Anton 38 • 7 

Hoderman, Max 3 7 

Jacobson, John 31 

Jager, Adolf 3 7 

fens Christopher 11 7 

Jensi n, P. A. J 38 7 

Johnsen, Fred 28 7 

Johnson, Thomas 31 7 

Johnson, John A 34 7 

Johnson, ( >tto Herman 23 7 

Karlson, Gideon 9 

Koski, Leander 7 

Kruhming, Andrew 44 

Larsen, Ludwig Jorgen Z 

Larsen, Anton 38 

Larsen, Andrew 48 

Lee, Walter Emmett 43 

Lehtonen, Carl Victor 18 

l.inehan, John 38 

Magnussen, Magnus 47 

Mahlc, Otto Sigurd 19 

Martin, Olaf Leif 47 

McConomy, John \2 

McDermott, James 22 

Miller, S. W. 33 

Miller, Charles 41 

Morris, Alfred 5 

Murry, Edward 11 

Newell, William 29 

Nick, Peter 35 

Nisscn, Alfred Heinrich 16 

Nordling, C. J 21 

Nygren, Carl 48 

O'Keefe, Edward 26 

Olsen, Charles 34 

( >lsen, Lars Borge 36 

Olsson, Nils L 37 

Olsson, Paul 3 

Olsson, August V 26 

Perkins, John Paul 38 

Person, Olaf Peter 47 7 

Persson, H. W 13 7 

Petersen, E. A 14 7 

1 '< terson, Charles 45 7 

Peterson, Charles 48 7 

Pukki, Tapio 16 7 

Rasimissen, Elmer 26 7 

Reichel, Alfred Alex 4 7 

Roslof, Johan Hjalmar 36 7 

Scherlau, Robert 10 7 

Schmidt, George 18 7 

Schmidt, Rernhard 38 7 

Schultz, Albert 21 7 

ers, Gottfried C 41 7 

Soderstrom, John A 48 7 

Tomkins, Frank 2 7 

Walker, F.mil 36 7 

Westerholm, Ernest Oscar '50 7 

Wilsi m, 1 . m is 51 7 

Wittenberg, A. K. A. R 48 7 

Wold, Olof 26 7 

Ziflfer, Charles 3 7 

San Francisco — 

Panama-Pacific International Exposi- 
tion Closed * 13 7 

Immigration Officials Indicted at San 

Francisco 23 5 

San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 

Juggles with Figures 31 1 

Francisco's Water Supply 33 2 

Steamboatmen's Strike, Etc 

.33-6- 34-12' 
37-6; ; 7; 40-6; 41-6; 42-7; 44-6; 45-6; 

German Consul-General Orders Re- 
moval of Strike Breakers from In- 
terned Vessel * 40 

San Francisco Mint, Cash on Hand In 45 
real Peace Meeting 46 

Mullally, Thornwall, Exposed by Ru- 
dolph Spreckels 46 2 

San Francisco Bomb Explosion *.... 46 6 

Hearst — The Slanderer * 46 6 

San Francisco Preparedness Parade * 46 7 

Ohio Building, Floats on San Fran- 
cisco Bay 50 5 

Nolan, John I., Congressman, Again 
Elected at Primaries 52 6 

Tabor Hay at San l'rancisco 52 7 

Highest Level in Bank Clearings . . . r>2 13 

San Francisco Chamber of Commerce 
"Open Shop" Campaign — 
'Mien Shoppers of San Francisco Re- 
pudiated by Waterfront Employers 42 7 
Open Shop Ni n-Union Shop * ... 43 6 

Law and Order ; 44 6 

Class Rule and Violence * 46 6 

M. & M. Stupidity 46 8 

The Case Reversed * 47 6 

The Law and Order Meeting * 47 6 

W ell Deserved Rebuke 47 9 

Clear Terms Demanded 47 10 

Another Plague * 48 6 



46-7 



7 

13 
1 



Title No. 

\ n House * 48 

Culinary Workers' Strike * 48 

hem L'p! 48 

Can Never Tell * 49 

Theory vs. Practice * 49 

Inside Data About the "Law and 

Order" Brigade 49 

No End to Anything 50 

Methodists Taking Their Rightful 

ice 50 

Analyzing the Purifiers * 50 

The Dollar Speech Again * i'.v 50 

Won't Mix 50 

inition of the Open Shop 51 

"Freedom?" * 51 

A "Plain Issue" Analyzed ^2 

Labor Day Address of Mayor Rolph.. ^2 

San lose Dream, A * 4 

e Survivals 31 

Savings Banks iii Public Schools 46 

Scandinavians in America 11 

Schwab's Eulogy to Labor * 49 

Schwerin, R. P., Appointed Manager of 

Associated Oil Co 11 

Schwerin's Little Flags * 14 

Science, What It L Doing 32 

Scientific Management Exposed 45 

"Scraps of Paper," More 32 



Scurvy and Beri-Beri * 



29 



Page 

6 
7 
8 
6 
6 

7 
2 

2 
6 

7 
8 

1 
7 
1 

7 

7 
6 
13 
7 
7 

5 
6 

11 
3 
9 
7 
7 

11 



Sea and It Riches, The 4 

Sea Animals, Early 21 

Seabirds of Peru 20 2 

Seamen's Act, See International Sea- 
men's Union of America 

Seamen Made to Order * 32 6 

Seamen, Nationality of * 41 6 

Seamen's Publications * 18 7 

Seamen and Subsidies * 45 6 

Seamen's "Welfare Work" * 31 6 

Sea Power In the Seamen JO 1 

Sea Power, the Price of 32 1 

"Selkirk" Monarchy, A 21 10 

Serpents, A Garden of ^2 9 

Servants or Masters? * 34 6 

Service (by Scott Nearing) 2 8 

Shipbuilding During 1915 23 9 

Shipbuilding in Japan 5 9 

Shipbreakers Buy "Britannia" 45 2 

Shipping Losses Due to War 31-14; 32-2 

Shipping Ring, Dissecting the 51 7 

Ship Purchase Bill. The 25 1 

Ship Subsidies, About * 4 6 

Ships Missing 6 9 

Ship Subsidies Opposed by A. F. of L. .. 12 1 

Ship Subsidies * 17 6 

Ship-Subsidy, Farmers Against 27 9 

Ship-Subsidy and the A. F. of L. * ... 36 6 

Ship-Subsidy, Another Plea for * 38 6 

Ship-Subsidies Paid by Foreign Coun- 
tries 43 1 

Sign, A Hopeful * 33 6 

Slandering Trade-Unionism 21 8 

Socialism (State) in England 41 11 

Socialist Congressman Presides in House 25 8 

Socialists, German, The 27 2 

Social Preparedness First 22 3 

"Sole Salvor" Rewarded 4 9 

Speeding-Up System, The 38 8 

"Speeding l'p" System Defeated 41 10 

Spies vs. Rotten Tubes ("Minnesota") * 15 6 

Spitzbergen Coal 34 2 

Stage Money 49 8 

Standpatter Explains, A * 14 7 

Startling Profits of British Shipowners.. 29 11 

Statistics About Yourself 17 11 

Statistics "Made to Order" 31 1 

Steamboatmen's Strike (See San Fran- 
cisco) 

Steam Sounding Machines 7 8 

Steel Trust's Earnings 25 13 

Steel Trust Prosperity 11 9 

Stefansson's Achievements 52 8 

Stop Watch "Joker" Blocked by Senate 51 3 

Storms, The Cause of 45 11 

Strikes and "Neutrality" * 4 6 

Strike Clause, Using the 35 9 

Submarine Built for Spanish Govern- 
ment at Quincy, Mass 47 14 

Submarine Cargoes 49 8 

Submarine Cruiser, New German 51 8 

Submarine, Life in a 16 8 

Submarine, The (Book Review) 45 11 

Subsidy (See Ship-Subsidy) 

Suez Canal, Increase in Tolls 48 14 

Sulphur in New Zealand 4 11 

Swedish Ships, Manning of 36 8 



Tanker, Future of the * 49 6 

Tariff vs. Unemployment * 5 6 

Texas. Feudalism in 11 9 

"T. F. Oakes," The 10 10 

Think for Yourself 21 10 

"Titanic" Compromise, The 49 8 

Tow. A Record 40 11 

i of London, The 49 11 

Trachoma Hospitals 2<' 

Trade-Union Benefits * 50 6 

Trade-Union Finances 38 10 

Trade-Union Finances 42 8 

Trade-Unionism in Schools 24 10 

Trade-Unionism, Slander of 21 8 

Trade-Unionists Defined 48 9 

Trade-Union Women, The (Book Re- 
view i 51 9 

Wars, Evils of 50 2 

Training Boys for the Sea 34 2 

Tramp, The 41 8 

Triple Alliance, The New British 40 2 



TJtle no. Page 

Trust-Busting, Modern * _ij 7 

Turkey's Discreet Silence 3f, g 

Typhoid Carrier, A Human 6 9 

U-V 

Uhler, Geo. C, Attention 15 11 

Ultimatums, Too Many From Japan * . 33 6 

"Un-American" Is Stale Plea 59 2 

Uncle Sam as an Employer * 20 7 

Unemployment Problem, The (Address 

by Paul Scbarrenberg) 43 7 

Unemployment Remedy, An * 31 6 

Union Headquarters Raided in London.. 23 8 

Union Label, Power of the J7 H 

Union Laber Promotion * 16 6 

Union Shop — Closed Shop 22 1 

United States Cement Production of 

1915 20 2 

United States Coast Survey 28 7 

United States Consular Regulations 

(New) Relating to Seamen 47 1 

United States Department of Labor 

Won't Break Strikes 48 11 

United States Foreign Trade 15 13 

United States Income Tax Collections 47 13 

United States Industry, Toll of 23 1 

United States National Banks, Resoui 

of 52 13 

United States Naturalization Denied to 

Japanese 33 2 

United States Naval Reserve, The 32 1 

United States Navy, Cost of Subsist- 
ence * 32 7 

United States Navy, Duty of 46 11 

United States Navy, Paying for the . . . . 2H 11 

United States Navy Secretary Defended 34 11 

United States Oil Production 15 13 

L T nited States Post Office Revenues... 15 13 
United States Public Health Service, 

Statistics on Labor Exploitation. .. . 33 1 

United States Radio Stations 7 9 

United States Shipbuilding for Fiscal 

Year Ending June 30. 1916 45 14 

United States Shipbuilding, Progress of 33 9 

United States Shipping, Increase In ... 41 11 

Unity in Effort * 12 6 

"Uplifters" Do Not Lift 34 2 

Uplifters Rapped (by Frank P. Walsh) 22 

Valparaiso Port Works 43 14 

Vessel Built in 1787 40 10 

"Vicious Influences" * 32 7 

Violence in Labor Disputes 44 1 

W 

Wages After the War 50 9 

Wages (High) Essential to Health... 25 10 

Wages of Crews on L T . S. Vessels 48 8 

Wages of White and Chinese Seamen... 19 1 

Wages. One Reason for Higher * 39 6 

Wages, Reasonable 12 2 

Wages vs. Dividends * 20 6 

Wanted — "More Immigrants" 31 2 

Wanted— Truthful Publicity 15 1 

War, European — 

"Stop the War" (by J. Scott Duckcrs) 3 8 

War Risk Report 3 9 

"War and the International" 6 1 

Piling Up the War Debt- 11 8 

"Lusitania" Again, The 12 2 

German Shipping, Captured, Sunk and 

Interned 17 10 

France Searching Our Ships 16 7 

Sw eden's Courageous Stand 16 9 

War's Greatest Danger 17 9 

Russia at War, Why Is 17 11 

Gallipoli, Evacuation of 17 15 

Allied Shipping Sunk 17 15 

United States Senators Talk War 19 11 

United States Protest Against British 

Interference With Neutral Mail, 21-15; 38-15 
"Mocwe," German Raider Heard From 

22-15; 25-11; 27-15; 38-8 

War's Real Object, The * 22 7 

"Appam," (German Prize) Arrives at 

Hampton Roads ... .22-15; 25-11; 41-14; 47-6* 

Portuguese Seize German Merchant Ships 26 15 

Italy Seizes German Merchant Ships... 28 15 

Summary of World War 31 8 

British Take Passengers From "China" 30-ll;32-15 

Embargo Act, Belling the 31 8 

Hospital Ships Engaged in Dardanelles 

Attack 34 14 

Kut-el-Amara Surrender to Turks 34 15 

Blacklisted Tonnage (Latest British List) 36 14 

Jutland Naval Battle, The 39 15 

Alter the War, What' * 41 6 

Painless Warfare 41 9 

Belgian Refugees in England 41 15 

British Rule in Ireland 44 8 

Vnglo-Japanese Alliance, The * 45 7 

Result of European War 47 10 

Capitalistic Conference, A (Economic 

Relations of Allies After the War) AH 9 

When Peace Is Made 48 11 

Gorizia, Fall of 49 15 

Wages After the War 50 9 

Blacklist, International, The 51 8 

Italy Declares War on Germany 51 15 

Rumania Joins Allies 52 15 

Changes in British Cabinet ?2 15 

War Trust, The World-Wide (by Clyde 

H. Tavenner) 

War' Who Wants (by Clyde H. 

Tavenner -° °- 

Wealth and Income, Our 23 8 

Wells. World's Deepest I 11 

Western Pacific R. R.. Sold at Auction.. 44 13 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL INDEX— VOLUME TWENTY-NINE 



Title No. 

What Good Can Money Do? 43 

What Next? * 30 

Why Sailors Do Not Sail 25 

Women Pearl Divers in Japan 13 

Women, Too Many 12 

Women Uphold Seamen's Act * 7 

Women Who Toil on Farms 6 

Words, New, in American Dictionary... 50 
Workers "Done Up" Through Long 

Hours 41 

Working Hours, Limitation by Law .... 41 

Workers Without a Grievance * 21 

Workmen's Compensation — 

Industrial Accidents in California .... IS 

Compensation Legislation 16 

California Compensation Law 27 

Industrial Accident Prevention in Cali- 
fornia (Praiseworthy Work*) 34 

California State Insurance Data * ... 35 
Occupational Hazards of Seamen .... 37 
Workmen's Compensation for Federal 
Employes (A Wcll-Earned Victory)* 51 

Workmen's Municipal Houses 16 

World's Greatest Port 46 

World-Wide War Trust, The (by Clyde 

H. Tavenner) 6-8; 

Would-Be Corrupters Exposed 45 

Wounds, Self-inflicted 51 

Wrecks — 

Aberdeen 21-5; 22-5; 

Admiral Clark 52 

Admiral Watson 2-5; 

Argusa 37 

Albert D. Mills 46 

Alliance 7 

Appalachcc 25 

Ariadne 25 

Arthur 25 

Athinai 7 

Australian Transport 23 

Avio 51 

Barrister 48 

Bear 41-5; 42-5; 

43_5 ; 44-5: 45-7; 46-5; 47-5; 49-5; 50-5; 

Belford 25 

Belridge 24 

Bordeaux 3 

Bowhead 7 

Bowling Green 26 

British Yeoman 25 

Bure 49 

Calchas 9 

Cap Trafalger 32 

Carolina 8 

Carolyn 43 

Carrie Haley 36 

Chiyo Mam 36 

Ciampa 3 

Cilta di Messina 44 

City of Panama 21-5; 

City of Savannah 42 

Clan McTavish 25 

Clara Nevada 43 

Clare 12 

Cocos 51 

"C. O. J." 28 

Condor 20 



Page 

9 

6 

11 

11 

8 

6 

11 



10 
1 
6 



7 
2 

1 

7 
6 
1 

6 

10 

9 

1-9 

1 



30-7 
5 

51-5 

15 

14 

5 

15 
11 
11 
14 
15 
14 



52-7 
14 
15 
14 

5 
14 

5 
15 

5 
15 
14 
15 
14 

5 

14 
15 
51-5 
14 
11 

5 

5 

15 
14 
14 



Title No. 

Corbridge 25 

Curacao 15 

Daijin Maru 24 

Delhi 7 

Desola 1 

Diamond L 4 

Dora 47 

Dresden 42 

Dromonby 25 

Eaton Hall 5 

Eastington 10 

Eastland, Final Estimate of the Dead 1 

Eastland, "As Soon as Practicable" *.. 2 

Eastland Was Mismanaged 6 

Eastland Indictments 6 

Eastland, Responsibility for 8 

Eastland (Sold) IS 

Eastland, Built for Freight 22 

Eastland, "No One to Blame" * 27 

Eastland, Report of Technical Board.. 33 

Eastland, "None Guilty Shall Escape" 48 

Eastland, The Good It Did 49 

Edith 5 

Edith G 12 

Emma S. Lord 49 

Empress of I reland ; . . 33 

Elna 51 

Fl Sud 5 

Ethel 36 

Excelsior 23-5; 24-5; 26-5; 

"F-4" (U. S. Submarine) 2 

Fairmount 5 

Farringford 25 

Fifield ..-. 26 

Fort Bragg 11-5; 20-5; 24-5; 

Freda 51 

Frcniona 51 

George Burham 26 

Glitra 51 

Grace Harwar 46 

Graywood 5- 

Harlcsden 5 

Harry 35 

Heidrun 28 

Hendnnhall 5 

H. C. Henry 9 

Independence, U. S. S 3 

Invcrmark 29 

Ivanhoe 17 

Judith 9 

Kanawha 32 

Karema 43 

Karin 28 

Kenkon Maru 46 

Kronprins Olaf 10 

La Provence 27 

Lansing 37 

Letimbro 48 

Linda Fell 14 

Lota 4 

Louisiane 29 

Lucinda Sutton 45 

Lurlinc 2 

Magnolia 32-^; 

Majestic 19 

Malmland 9 

Manclalay 5 

Mariechen 45 

Mariposa 8-5; 13-5; 



Page 
11 

5 
14 

5 
14 



3 

15 
11 
14 
14 
13 

6 
10 
13 

7 
14 
10 

6 
13 

9 

2 



14 
15 
15 
14 
14 
51-5 
14 
14 
11 
7 

49-11 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 

7, 10 
14 
14 
14 
14 
14 



14 
15 
14 

5 
14 
14 
13 
15 
11 
14 
15 
14 

5 

46-5 

14 

14 



Title No . 

Marquette io 

12 



M 



Matatua 49-14; 

Merida 35 

Morowitz 5 

Mount Carmel 52 

Neptunus 51 

Normandy 44 

Northbank 17 

Northland 45 

Northwest 4 

Noyo J3 

Oakland 29-5; 34-5; 44-5- ' 46-5- 

O. M. Kellog 16 

Onoko 6 

Oriental 46 

Orkedal 49 

Oscar G 40 

Pachitea 25 

Pavlof 24 

Pere Marquette 19 " 26 

Persia 17-15; 21-15; 

Poltalloch 21 

President 16 

Principe de Asturis 45 

Principe Umberto 42 

Prins Yaldemar 10 

Prosper III 49 

Quadra 26-5 ; 

Ramona 29 

Rio Pasig .32-5; 

Repeat 21 

Ribston 5 

Rijndijk 49 

Roanoke 36-5; 6*;38-5, 7; 40- 

Roanoke, List of Dead 38 

Rufford Hall 10 

Santa Clara 9-5; 14-5; 16-5; 

Sappho 26 

Saronic 19 

Sausalito 17 

Saxon Prince 38 

Seiko Maru 38 

Scsostris 27 

Silver Wings 3 

Skraastad 28 

S. R. Kirby 38 

St. Catherine 39 

Shna-Yak 46-5; 47-5; 48-7; 49-5; 

Sussex 36 

Takata Maru 24 

Thessaloniki 18-14; 

Thomas J. Carroll 16 

Titanic 49 

Trader 25 

Transylvania 44 

Trondhjemsfjord 50 

Tuba tan ia 31-15: 

Walkuere-Republic 4-5; 33-5; 

Wallace 5 

Washingtonian 45 

Wilhelmina 47 

William Chisholm 49 

William T. Lewis 3 

Woodbury 3 



Page 
15 

5 

51-15 

14 

14 

14 

15 

14 

5 

7 

5 

50-5 

7 
14 

5 
15 
14 
11 

5 

14 

30-11 

14 

5 

15 
15 

5 

15 
31-5 

5 
47-5 

5 

14 
15 

;, 6* 
7 

14 

21-5 

15 

14 

5 

8 



21 



14 
14 
13 

14 

50-5 

15 

15 

14 

1-1 

8 

11 

9 

15 

37-15 

35-5 

14 

14 

15 

14 

14 

14 



Youngstown, The Lesson of 



20 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXIX, No. 1. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15, 1915. 



Whole No. 2347. 



MASS MEETING A GRAND SUCCESS 



Stage Fright Strikes R. P. Schwerin and Robert Dollar. 



Anyone can "pose" as a "victim." It requires 
neither brains nor courage. 

But it requires both to meet your adversary 
in open and honest public debate. 

Therefore, that "aching void" in the big public 
mass meeting, held in the Scottish Rite Audi- 
torium at San Francisco on last Wednesday, 
for the purpose of presenting all the facts about 
the new Seamen's law. 

Everything in connection with that memor- 
able public gathering was a howling success. 

The big crowd assembled early and filled the 
magnificent auditorium, gallery and all. 

Mr. Rudolph Spreckels, the chairman of the 
evening, was there on time and in fine mettle. 

Walter Macarthur and Andrew Furuseth were 
there with facts, figures and abundance of 
eloquence. 

"Not Present" on Roll Call. 

But the distinguished opponents of the Sea- 
men's law were mainly conspicuous by their 
absence. Neither R. P. Schwerin nor "Captain" 
Robert Dollar had been able to muster suf- 
ficient courage to face the music — to "make 
good" their newspaper assertions that the new 
Seamen's law is driving the American flag from 
the seas. In a sense, it was the most candid 
admission of their inability to meet the issue 
fairly and squarely. It was also an acknowl- 
edgment of the well known fact that the 
Schwerin-Dollar arguments cannot stand the 
acid test. 

Chairman Rudolph Spreckels was introduced 
to the audience by Mr. Paul Scharrenberg, editor 
of the Coast Seamen's Journal, who also briefly 
stated the purpose of the meeting. 

Mr. Spreckels, after a few appropriate re- 
marks upon the desirability of acquainting the 
people with the true facts involved in the new 
legislation, introduced Mr. Walter Macarthur, 
United States Shipping Commissioner at San 
Francisco. 

Walter Macarthur Has the Facts. 

Mr. Macarthur stated that it was not his in- 
tention to make an argument for the new Sea- 
men's law, but that he would rather attempt to 
deliver a reply to the many misleading news- 
paper assertions which have been made of late 
with reference to the "decline" of the American 
Merchant Marine. 

Among other things Mr. Macarthur then 
proved that the merchant marine of the United 
Slates, instead of being wiped from the seas, 
was the second largest in the world and con- 
stantly growing. 

He showed by irrefutable evidence that the 
American shipping world was in a prosperous 
condition and was going about its business as 
if there never was any such thing as a Sea- 
men's act. 

He also called attention to the fact that the 
buyers of the Pacific Mail were able to pay a 
"very handsome price" for the line, and char- 
acterized the sale as "a very good bargain all 
around." 

Following is some of the data submitted by 
Mr. Macarthur: 

American' and Foreign Shipping in 1914. 

Lloyds' Registry of Shipping, for the year 



ending June 30, 1914, estimates the total mer- 
chant shipping of the world (exclusive of ves- 
sels under 100 tons), as follows: 

No. of vessels: steam, 24,444; sail, 6,392 — Total, 
30,836. Tonnage: steam, gross, 45,403,877; net, 
27,987,782; sail, net, 3,685.675— Total, 49,089,552. 

The number of vessels and their tonnage 
owned by the ten leading maritime nations is 
as follows: 

Country No. of Vessels Tonnage 

Great Britain 11,328 21,045,049 

Germany 2,388 5,459,296 

United States 3,174 5,368,194 

Norway 2,191 2,504,722 

France 1,576 2,139,438 

Japan 1,103 1,708,386 

Holland 806 1,496,455 

Sweden 1,466 1,118,086 

Austro-Hungarv 445 1,055,719 

Russia 1,254 1,053,818 

The remaining 6,000,000 tons is distributed 
among forty nations throughout the world. 

Changes Shown by Estimates for 1915. 

The foregoing figures cover the period im- 
mediately preceding the outbreak of the war, 
and are therefore representative of normal con- 
ditions. The latest issue of Lloyds' Register 
brings the estimates down to June 30, 1915. 
These estimates show that the total tonnage of 
the world's merchant marine has slightly in- 
creased, notwithstanding the war. The present 
total tonnage is 49,261,769, of which 21,274,068, 
or 43 per cent., is owned by Great Britain. 

During the year German shipping has de- 
creased 753,269 tons, while that of the United 
States has increased 524,445 tons. Thus the 
latest estimates place the United States in 
second rank among the maritime nations of the 
world. The total tonnage of the American mer- 
chant marine is now 5,892,639. 

The increase of American tonnage during the 
past year is about three times greater than the 
average annual increase during any previous 
year in American history. 

Effect of Ship Registry Act. 

The larger part of this increase is represented 
by vessels transferred from foreign to American 
registry under the Ship Registry Act of August 
18, 1914. The latest report on the operation of 
that Act, dated August 28, 1915, shows that up 
to that date 161 vessels, of 564,278 tons, have 
been added to the American merchant marine. 
Under the provisions of the Ship Registry Act 
these vessels will be operated exclusively in the 
foreign trade. 

The single vessel which, as announced in the 
press, is likely to be returned to her original 
registry, "on account of the Seamen's Act," 
measures 5,356 tons, or less than 1 per cent, of 
the tonnage already transferred from foreign to 
American registry. 

These figures do not include the twelve ves- 
sels, of 44,251 tons, recently purchased by the 
American Transatlantic Company and recently 
admitted to American registry. 

American Shipping in Foreign Trade. 

The Annual Report of the Commissioner of 
Navigation for the year ending June 30, 1915, 



shows the proportion of American shipping reg- 
istered for the foreign trade, as follows: 
American Vessels Registered for Foreign Trade. 

No. of Vessels, 2,768. Tonnage, 1,813,775. 

This is the largest amount of tonnage regis- 
tered for the foreign trade since 1863. The 
present tonnage is many times more efficient 
in carrying capacity than at any period in the 
past, as it is composed chiefly of steam vessels, 
whereas the tonnage of the former period con- 
sisted chiefly of sailing vessels. Of these vessels 
more than 300 measure between 5,000 and 10,000 
tons. 

The latest available figures of tonnage in the 
foreign trade entered and cleared at American 
ports are those for the year ending June 30, 
1914, as follows: 

Percentage of Tonnage. 

Total tonnage in foreign trade entered and 
cleared at American ports, 106,571,986; propor- 
tion of American tonnage included in foregoing, 
27,470,703; per cent. American, 26. 

Percentage of Value. 

Total vahie of foreign exports and imports, 
$37,785,468,512; proportion of foregoing carried 
in American vessels, $368,359,756; per cent. 
American, 9.7. 

The apparent discrepancy between the pro- 
portions of tonnage and values carried in Ameri- 
can vessels is due to the shipment of precious 
freight (including bullion) in foreign vessels. 
The proportions of tonnage may therefore be 
regarded as affording the most reliable basis of 
comparison. 

Boom in Shipbuilding. 

On July 1 of the present year there were 
under construction in American shipyards 65 
steel merchant vessels, of 298,426 tons, the 
highest figure since 1907. The tonnage being 
built on the seaboard is greater than in any 
previous year in the history of the country. 

The prices paid for new tonnage are from $15 
to $18 per ton higher than those of a year ago, 
and the profits of the shipbuilding companies 
are proportionately larger. The demand for 
vessels exceeds the present output of the yards 
several times over. 

It is reported that the stock of the Cramp 
Shipbuilding Company, which has paid from 10 
to 135/2 per cent, in the recent past, is now 
earning from 25 to 30 per cent., and investors 
express the belief that shares will go to a much 
higher level. 

Immense Profits of Shipowners. 

The International Mercantile Marine earned a 
profit of $11,000,000 during the six months end- 
ing June 30, 1915, after deducting depreciation 
charges of about $2,750,000. Assuming the pros- 
pects of the present half-year to be equal to 
those above quoted, the business of this concern 
will show profits of $22,000,000. after deducting 
$5,500,000, or 5 per cent., for depreciation 
charges. The average earnings for the pre- 
ceding five years were $2,656,387. The presenl 
earnings show an increase in profits of more 
than 1000 per cent. 

A certain steamship sailing from San Fran- 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



recently earned in excess of $2,000 per day 
on a voyage to Australia. The profit on the 
return cargo will probably increase the total by 
iO per cent, for the round voyage. This vessel 
£600,000 when new, and it is estimated that 
she will pay fur herself during the present year. 
Freight Rates Go Sky High. 

Grain freights from coast ports to Australia 
and the United Kingdom have gone as high as 
hillings during the recent past, and it is 
believed they may yet go as high as 200 
shillings. The present average is about 90 
shillings, exceeding the highest figure paid 
during the past 39 years. 

There is unprecedented activity in shipping in 
ihis port. Many small coasting vessels are 
being pulled off the trade under charter to enter 
the foreign trade at fancy figures. 

Many Lake vessels are being put in the ocean- 
carrying trade, notwithstanding the great ex- 
penditure necessary to cut them apart in order 
that they may pass through the canals and to 
refit them for the new trade. 

The Greek steamer "Kalypso," of 2307 tons, 
cost £38,700 when new in 1904. She was sold 
in 1911 for £24,500. Recently she was again 
sold for £60,000, nearly twice her value when 
new. eleven years ago. 

At the conclusion of Mr. Macarthur's address 
Chairman Spreckels inquired if Mr. Schwerin 
was in the audience and expressed his 
disappointment when diligent search failed to 
produce neither Mr. Schwerin nor Mr. Dollar. 
Mr. Spreckels said he thought it rather strange 
that the two men who had most bitterly at- 
tacked the new legislation should pass up this 
splendid opportunity to present their case to 
the public. 

Furuseth Enlightens the Audience. 

The Chairman then briefly introduced Mr. 
Andrew Furuseth, President of the International 
Seamen's Union of America. 

Mr. Furuseth made an exhaustive and elo- 
quent address which was frequently interrupted 
by enthusiastic applause. He proved, (first) 
that the new Seamen's law was "right" and 
"just" and in keeping with modern concept ions 
of freedom. He proved (second) that the legis- 
latior was entirely "practicable" and especially 
designed to enable American shipowners to 
compete in the foreign-going trade. 

Every phase of the question was fully, clearly 
and comprehensively dealt with by Mr. Furu- 
seth. 

The latest statement issued by the local 
Chamber of Commerce was analyzed and dis- 
sected. 

The mysterious transfer of the two coolie- 
manned tramp steamers owned by "Captain" 
Robert Dollar was fully explained to the great 
enjoyment of the vast audience. 

What Schwerin Said on Feb. 1, 1913. 

The sale (or transfer) of the Pacific Mail 
Steamship Company's transpacific vessels re- 
ceived every attention and it was demonstrated 
1 the shadow of a doubt that these ves- 
sels were taken from the run to the Orient 
not on account of the new Seamen's law but 
solely because they were railroad-owned and 
could therefore not pass through the Panama 
Canal. Mr. Schwerin's own published testi- 
mony was freely quoted to prove finally and 
conclusively that long before the Seamen's 
bill had been enacted into law (i. e., on Feb. 
1, 1913) he made this positive and unqualified 
announcement before the House Committee on 
Merchant Marine and Fisheries "I want to say 
that I am done with the American flag forever. 
I would not raise my hand to raise a dollar for 
the American flag. My interest in this business 
before this committee to-day, gentlemen, is abso- 
lutely because I am practically subpoenaed here. 
I have no interest in the shipping business. I 
am about to retire." 

At the conclusion of Mr. Furuseth's remarks 
there was a great demonstration, it being evi- 
dent that the vast audience had seen through 
the Bimsy structure erected by the leading 
opponents of the La Follette Seamen's Act. 



BIRD PROTECTION. 



Steadily but surely official aid, govern- 
mental authority and private initiative are 
circumscribing the practice, formerly so 
freely indulged in by less thoughtful and 
kindly persons, of destroying birds in the 
United States. By the combined action of 
private 1 donors and the nation, bird reserves 
or sanctuaries are multiplying and birds 
are being insured places in which to rest 
and nest. The latest tract set apart is in 
the Big Lake region, Arkansas, in thi 
called "sunk lands" where for years water 
fowl plume collectors have done their com 
mercial, marauding work. Worthies 
agricultural purposes, this government land. 
several thousand acres in area and ideally 
watered for reserve purposes, has been for- 
ever set aside for a bird sanctuary. 



ORAL CONTRACT SUSTAINED. 

Editor, Coast Seamen's Journal: 

On the 8th instant Judge Dooling de- 
cided in favor of John W. Ericksen and 
against the Union Fish Company a libel 
brought by Ericksen again si the Fish Com- 
pany for wages. 

Ericksen alleged in his libel that he made 
an oral contract with the Fish Company 
to proceed to Pirate Cove, Alaska, and 
there to serve them as master of the 
schooner "Martha" for not less than a 
year and during that time to assist the 
manager of the salting; station when pos- 
s'hle to do so without interfering with his 
duties as master of the schooner; that he 
was to receive for his services $55.00 a 
month and board and lodging for himself 
and wife, and at the end of not less than 
a year transportation hack to San Fran- 
cisco: that after serving for a little more 
than a month, he was. without fault on his 
part, discharged. 

Several ingenious defenses were made by 
the Fish Company, to-wit: 

That the State law, and not the maritime 
law, applied to the contract, and that it 
was not, therefore, binding, because it was 
for a year and was not in writing; 

That the manager of the Fish Company 
at San Francisco had no authority from the 
company to hire for a year; 

That, because part of Ericksen's service's 
were to he performed on shore at the salt- 
ing station, the case was not within the 
jurisdiction of the admiralty court. 

The judge's decision was as follows: 

"Libelant was hired for a year, his serv- 
ices under the contract beginning June 12th, 
1 (| 14. ( )n July 18th he was discharged 
without cause. For his services he was to 
receive $55.00 per month, and board and 
lodging for himself and wife. The value 
of such hoard and lodging was. according 
to the evidence, $55.00 per month. He was 
paid for his services up to July 18th, and 
hoard and lodging was furnished up to Au- 
gust 5th, 1914. He is therefore entitled to 
judgment for $55.00 a month from July 
18th, 1914, to June 12th, 1915. as wages, 
and $55.00 a month from August 5th. 1914, 
to June 12th, 1915. for hoard and lodging, 
less such sums as he was able to earn in 
other employment during these periods. 
For wages therefore he is entitled to $594.00 
and for hoard and lodging he is entitled to 
$562.80, a total of $1156.80. But from this 
must he deducted $440.75, being the amount 
earned by him in such employment as he 
could secure during the period. This leaves 
$716.05, for which he is entitled to judg- 
ment." 

H. \V. Mutton, Esq., represented the Fish 
Company and I represented Ericksen. 
yours very truly, 

P. R. Wall. 

San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 10. 1915. 



LARGE CEMENT PRODUCTION. 



The Geological Survey's annual state- 
ment on the cement industry for 1914 is 
now being distributed. During the year 
X7.2?7,?52 barrels of the principal hy- 
draulic cements were produced, with a 
value of $80,533,203. The map accompany- 
ing the report shows the distribution of the 
principal cement plants and outlines the 
Portland cement ceimmercial districts. 



CAUSES OF LABOR UNREST. 



Conclusion of Findings by United States Com- 
mission on Industrial Relations. 



Last week's issue of the Journal contained a 
summary of the reports and recommendations 
issued by representatives of the three groups 
(employers, employes and the public) which 
composed the Commission. 

The "staff" report, signed by Chairman Walsh 
and the three representatives of Labor, presents 
invaluable evidence in support of the statement 
thai the lives of millions of wage earners are 
subject to the dictation of a relatively small 
number of men. Fxcept, perhaps, for improve- 
ments in safety and sanitation, the labor condi- 
tions of corporation-controlled industries, says 
the report, are subject to grave criticism and are 
a menace to the welfare of the nation. Sys- 
tems of espionage are maintained to prevent 
organization of employes for betterment of their 
condition. The domination by the men in con- 
tod of a large part of American industry is not 
limited to their employes, but is being extended 
no] of education and social service. This 
is being largely accomplished through so-called 
"foundations." The Rockefeller Foundation is 
mentioned as a conspicuous example of what 
"constitutes a menace to the national welfare." 
Racked by $100 it "has the power to in- 

fluence the entire country in the determination 
of its most vital policy." Mr. Rockefeller is 
i 4 with planning to utilize literature which 
he knew at the time to lie untrue and mislead- 
ing. Congress is urged to compel the Founda- 
tion to secure a federal charter containing pro- 
visions limiting the funds, specifically defining 
its powers and providing for rigid inspection 
and complete publicity. Congress is further 
urged to order investigation of all endowed in- 
stitutions, both secular and religious, whose 
property holdings or income exceed a moderate 
it. It is further urged to provide for gov- 
ernment activity along lines of education and 
social service to counteract the influence of these 
foundations. 

The Concentration of Wealth. 
arding concentration of wealth the report 
declares that the Commission's investigations 
afford a basis for the following statements: 

"1. The control of manufacturing, mining and 
transportation industries is to an increasing de- 
gree passing into the hands of great corpora- 
tions through stock ownership, and control of 
credit is centralized in a comparatively small 
number of enormously powerful financial insti- 
tutions. These financial institutions are in turn 
dominated by a very small number of powerful 
financiers. 

"_'. The final control of American industry 
rests, therefore in the hands of a small number 
of wealthy and powerful financiers. 

"3. The concentration of ownership and con- 
trol is greatest in the basic industries upon 
which the welfare of the country must finally 
rest. 

"4. With few exceptions each of the great 
basic industries is dominated by a single large- 
corporation, and where this is not true, the con- 
trol of the industry through stock ownership in 
supposedly independent corporations and through 
credit is almost, if not cpjite, as potent. 

"5. In such corporations, in spite of the 
large number of stockholders, the control 
through actual stock ownership rests with a 
very small number of persons. For example, 
in the United States Steel Corporation, which 
had in 1911 approximately 100,000 shareholders, 
l.S per cent of the stockholders held 57 per 
cent, of the stock, while the final control 
rested with a single private banking house. 

"Similarly in the American Tobacco Co., be- 
fore the dissolution, 10 stockholders owned 60 
per cent, of the stock. 

"6. Almost without exception the employes 
of tlit- larger corporations are unorganized, as a 
result of the active and aggressive 'nonunion' 
policy of the corporation managements. 

"Furthermore, the labor policy of the large 
corporations almost inevitably determines the 
labor policy of the entire industry. 

"7. A careful and conservative study shows 
that the corporations controlled by six financial 
groups and affiliated interests employ 2,651,684 
wage earners and have a total capitalization of 
$19,875,200,000. These six financial groups con- 
trol 28 per cent, of the total number of wage 
earners engaged in the industries covered by the 
report of our investigation. The Morgan-First 
National Hank group alone controls corporations 
employing 785,499 wage earners. 

"8. The lives of millions of wage earners are, 
therefore, subject to the dictation of a relatively 
small number of men. 

"9. These industrial dictators for the most 
part are totally ignorant of every aspect of the 
industries which they control, except the 
finances, and are totally unconcerned with re- 
ward to the working and living conditions of 
the employes in those industries. F.ven if they 
\\<ie deeply concerned, the position of the eni- 
(Continued on page 8.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Gives Bonus But Bars Unions. 

The Smith & Wesson Company of 
Springfield, Mass., makers of rifles, an- 
nounce the inauguration of a bonus sys- 
tem, beginning September 1. All em- 
ployes will be paid 5 per cent, of then- 
total earnings during each quarter for the 
next year. One of the conditions makes 
it impossible for a worker to join a labor 
union and receive the bonus, as it pro- 
vides that the worker must notify the com- 
pany if he intends joining such labor or- 
ganization. If an employe resigns or is 
discharged he is disqualified from receiv- 
ing the bonus. 

The company does not deny that the 
new scheme was installed for the purpose 
of "quieting discontent." Trade unionists 
are comparing this "concession" with the 
gains organized workers secure without 
surrendering individual rights. 



Contract-Breaking Employers Rebuffed. 

Judge J. W. Tarbell, of Georgetown, Ohio, 
has refused, in an oral opinion, to dissolve 
the Portsmouth Building Trades Council. 
The court also declines to issue an injunc- 
tion against affiliated unions from "inter- 
fering in any way" with the Master Plumb- 
ers' Association or the business of its mem- 
bers. 

Last spring these employers started to 
break a contract between them and the 
Plumbers' Union. This agreement does not 
expire until 1917, and provides that on 
May 1, 1915, wages shall be increased 50 
cents a day. To avoid paying this increase 
it was necessary to smash the union, and 
the employers declared a lockout, after first 
organizing the Master Plumbers' Associa- 
tion. 

The Building Trades Council took up 
the fight for their affiliated local and the 
employers rushed into the court of com- 
mon pleas with a demand for injunction 
relief. Every building trades local and 
officer was included, and the court was 
asked to dissolve the Building Trades 
Council and to prohibit the unionists from 
forming a similar organization under an- 
other name. 

Judge Tarbell threw the case out of 
court, lie held that the agreement orig- 
inally entered into between the two par- 
ties was not unfair to the employers as 
they had knowingly accepted same; that 
the acts of defendants did not constitute 
intimidation ; that they had the right to 
organize local unions, and had the right to 
join with other locals in forming a central 
organizatii in. 

In his opinion the court intimated that 
a pleader for injunction relief must come 
into court with clean hands, and this the 
employers did not do. as they broke a bind- 
ing contract. The court further ruled that 
it was not against public policy for an em- 
ployer to agree to hire only union men. 



"Chain" Theory Is Upset. 

Frank A. Munsey has sold the Evening 
Xcws of Baltimore and says he has changed 
his views on controlling a "chain" of news- 
papers. 

"Theoretically the idea looked to be 



sound," said Mr. Munsey, "as great sa- 
vings seemed certain, and increased effi T 
ciency and usefulness seemed equally cer- 
tain. 

"Hut the newspaper chain idea in the 
outworking isn't the same thing it looked 
to be in analysis. It has a fatal defect 
which organization and capital cannot over- 
come — the defect that is felt in a news- 
paper under a salaried management as con- 
trasted with the newspaper under individ- 
ual ownership management. 

"No man representing another ownership 
can speak to the public through the col- 
umns of a newspaper quite as he would 
speak if the paper were his own. There 
is a difference that the public detects. It 
can't say just what that difference is, but 
it feels that difference. 

"Ownership management speaks a lan- 
guage that the community understands. It 
knows its accent, its intonations and char- 
acteristics, whereas with the salaried man- 
agement there is always something akin 
to the foreign accent that cannot be dis- 
guised." 



A Bishop on Trade-Unionism. 

In a speech before churchmen, Bishop 
Long of Bathurst, New South Wales, said : 

"If it had not been for unionism, nothing 
would have saved the workingman. The 
latter has only his labor to sell, and the 
only way to protect himself was by uniting. 
There is nothing in the simple annals of 
the poor to compare with the daring sacri- 
fices of the splendidly heroic leaders of 
British trade-unionism. The early apostles 
of trade-unionism were scoffed at. They 
were told that the laws of political econ- 
omy were against them, but they replied 
they would be against political economy. 
The logic was on the side of the man who 
was laughed at. After years of being il- 
legal, as it was supposed to be, in restraint 
of trade, and after suffering its leaders to 
be imprisoned and enduring obloquy, trade- 
unionism has asserted itself, and the pres- 
ent generation has come into the first fruits 
of victory." 



Teachers' Union Opposed. 

The rules committee of the Chicago 
Board of Education has recommended a 
rule to the board that would abolish the 
teachers' organization, affiliated to the trade- 
union movement. The board will vote on 
the rule Sept. 8. 

In a letter to President Gompers, Secre- 
tary Nockels of the local federation of labor 
gives these reasons for the antagonism: 

"Ever since the Teachers' federation dared 
to affiliate itself with the labor movement 
the trust press and the large corporation 
interests have howled themselves into a 
frenzy. The idea of a teacher teaching the 
children in the public schools belonging to 
a labor union was horrifying, and ever since 
the teachers joined the Chicago Federation 
of Labor they have been fought tooth and 
nail by both the press and big business 
interests. 

"They went to the courts and compelled 
the largest corporations in this city to pay 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



International Seamen"s Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 
Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St:, Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, Lon- 
don, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers. 4 Spekeland Bldgs., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pietcrs- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts Maritimes de France, 33 rue Grange aux- 
Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 
NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 
Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnclgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade 15, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 
Algemcene Nedcrlandsche Zeemansbond, Kal- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 
ITALY. 
Ecderazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S, Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 
Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 
SPAIN. 
Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Reposteros, ('alia Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 
Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calle Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 
Federation Obrcra Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 36.3 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinhciros c Remandores, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo dos Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiiro, 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society of South African Sea 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World's WorKers. 



The total number of fatal acci- 
dents to seamen reported to the 
British Board of Trade during June, 
1915, was 134, a decrease of 403 on 
May. 1915, and of 79 on June, 1914. 

A shortage of men for ordinary 
mercantile ships was reported at 
certain of the London docks, Liver- 
pool, Grimsby. Hull, Sunderland, 
Newcastle, and the Bristol Channel 
ports (except Swansea) and South- 
ampton. 

Reviewing the effect of the first 
year of war on the labor market the 
British Board of Trade Labor Ga- 
zette says that although the first 
shock of war caused much disorgan- 
ization, there is now very little un- 
employment except in a few luxury- 
trades, while in a number of indus- 
tries, notably coal mining, engineer- 
ing, ship-building, agriculture and 
transport, the demand for labor 
greatly exceeds the supply. On Au- 
gust 6 there were 17,274 men and 
41,374 women on the registers of 
the labor exchanges, against 19,993 
and 43,700 respectively a month ago. 
During the year two and a half mil- 
lion working people have had in- 
creases in rates of wages or war 
bonuses amounting to over two mil- 
lion dollars a week, or over three 
shillings per capita to those bene- 
fiting. 

The British Trade Union Congress 
in session at Bristol adopted vir- 
tually without opposition a resolu- 
tion presented by the Railway Clerks' 
Union on the subject of recruiting. 
The congress resolved: "That this 
ci ingress, being convinced that the is- 
sues involved in the present Euro- 
pean war are of transcendent im- 
portance to the democracies of this 
and other countries, hereby records 
its entire approval of the action of 
the parliamentary labor party in co- 
operating with other political parties 
in the national recruiting campaign." 
The consensus of opinion as revealed 
in speeches in support of the reso- 
lution was that it was no part of the 
teaching of trades unionism that it is 
the duty of man to turn the other 
cheek to the man who smites him. 
< )ne speaker said that if, when "dear 
brother Fritz" invaded Belgium, the 
British Government had not decided 
to resist this move, the men and 
women of Britain would have forced 
it to do so. 

The latest reports of the Danish 
Labor Arbitration Court contain 
particulars of the awards pro- 
nounced by that tribunal during the 
years 1913 and 1914. During the 
two years in question 48 cases (24 
in each year) were referred to the 
Court for decision, of which 31 
were initiated by employers' asso- 
ciations or individual employers and 
17 by trade unions. Of these, 8 
were settled by the parties at an 
early stage, 4 were dropped, and 1 
was postponed. The largest number 
of disputes occurred in the building 
trades, 22 cases being presented, 
the transport and woodworking 
trades coming next with 7 and S 
cases each. The principal questions 
involved were as follows- Strikes 
and lockouts, 20 cases; interpreta- 
tion of agreements or awards, 17 
cases; alleged boycotts by workmen, 
5; working arrangements, 2; wages, 
1; blacklisting, dismissal or vic- 
timization, 1; employment of non- 
unionists. 1; and non-compliance 
with award of court, 1 case. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. B. CANNON 



CANNON a BLAIZE 



A. E. BLAIZE 



Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men'* Suits Made to Order 
515 FRONT-516 BEACON STS. »*N PEDRO 



"WHEN IT COMES TO GOOD CLOTHES" 

Tailored to FIT YOU, in a UNION SHOP 
It will be to your Interest to call on 

S. G. SWANSON 

641 SOUTH BEACON STREET, next door to Postofflce 
Established 1904, at the Los Angeles "Waterfront" SAN PEDRO, CALIFORNIA 



San Pedro News Co. 

Sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



Mills, Elbert $ Nash 

SIXTH AND BEACON STREETS 

FIFTH AND BEACON STREETS 

— Dealers In — 

EDGEWORTH TOBACCO AND 

UNION LABEL CIGARS 



GIVE US A TRIAL 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

The members of the crew of the 
barkentine "Mary Winkelman" who 
made the voyage in her to Mollendo, 
Peru, and arrived at San Francisco 
on her return trip on April 5, 1914, 
are wanted by the Charles Nelson 
Co., at San Francisco, Cal. — 6-24-14 

John Erik Nordberg, a native of 
Sweden, age about 26, supposed to 
be sailing on the Pacific Coast, is 
inquired for by his brother Harold, 
care of Sailors' Union of the Pa- 
cific, San Francisco. 

Oscar Olsen, age 37, a native of 
Hallerna, near Gothenborg, Sweden, 
who was sailing on the Great Lakes 
about three years ago, is inquired 
for by John V. Olsen, Sun Com- 
pany, Marcus Hook, Pa. 5-26-15 

Adolph Godfred Eriksen, born in 
Moss, Norway, is inquired for by 
his brother, Herman Eriksen. Any 
one knowing his whereabouts please 
notify W. Nielsen, 206 Moravian St., 



M. BROWN and SONS 

have moved to 

109 SIXTH STREET 

Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Edgar Duncan Stewart, age 22 
years, white, born in Massachusetts, 
who, on October 9, 1912, was 
shipped as seaman on the American 
steamship "Toledo," at Marcus Hook, 
Pa., for a voyage to Sabine, Texas, 
but who did not join the vessel the 
next day, and has not since been 
heard from. The undersigned will 
highly appreciate your kind co-oper- 
ation: Augustine R. Smith, United 
States Shipping Commissioner, or 
Shipping Commissioner, Appraisers 
Building, San Francisco. 5-13-14 

Nils Edmund Johansen, a native of 
Tonsberg, Norway, age about 50, 
last heard of at Melbourne, Austra- 
lia, is inquired for by his brother. 
Address, Martin Johansen, 839 Cen- 
tennial avenue, Alameda, Cal. 

Eugene Martin, age 25, 6 feet tall, 
gray eyes, is inquired for by his 
mother. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify Mrs. Rose T. 
Martin, 4231 15 N. E., Seattle, 
Wash. 1-27-1915 

Chas. Maywell, a sailor, last heard 
of in New York City in 1892, is en- 
quired for by his son; anyone know- 
ing his whereabouts please notify 
William J. Maywell, 426 West 59th 
street, New York City, N. Y.— 12-23-14 



Philadelphia, Pa. 5-26-15 



A SAILOR'S BANK. 

With Branches Throughout the World 

In the Philippines, Japan, China, Straits Settlements, India, 
London, Mexico and Panama, the 

INTERNATIONAL BANKING CORPORATION 

is particularly well equipped to give service to 

SEA- FARING MEN 

IN THE 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 
of its San Francisco Branch 

it gives "Personal Service" and courteous treatment to all its 

customers. Four per cent, per annum is paid on Savings 

Deposits, computed semi-annually. 

In 1910 it purchased and took over the business of the 

SWEDISH AMERICAN BANK 

and for the accommodation of its Scandinavian customers, 
the bank carries on hand at all times an ample supply of 
Swedish, Norwegian and Danish 5Kr. and lOKr. bank notes. 

Sailors' Accounts are Especially Welcomed 

Head Office— 60 Wall Street, New York 

Resources over $40,000,000 

MILLS BUILDING :: BUSH and MONTGOMERY STREETS 

Uptown Branch, Geary and Fillmore Street* 

Open Saturday Evenings, 6 to I 

E. W. WILSON, Manager 



San Pedro Letter List. 



Anderson, John 
Anderson, Arvld 
Anderson, G. B. 
Altonen, Chas. 
Anderson, Oscar 
Anderson, Ernest 
Andersson, Enkan 
Apelquist, Otto 
Anderson, David C. 
Baxter, Arthur 
Bergh, Borge 
Bredberg, H. 
Bergquist, W. 
Buanik. L. 
Breln, Hans 
Brlngsrud, Marald 
Carera, Pete 
Contrera, J. 
Chrlstensen, Martin 
Chilton. Harry 
l lahlgren, Pete 
Doyle, William 
Duval, William 
Ellison, Sam 
Engstrom. M. R. 
Ericsson, Otto 
Felsh, Harry 
Fisher. Wm. 
Fasholz, Dan 
Hendrtcksen, Henry 

P. 
ITanspn. Oskar 
Holmstrom, F. 
Hansen, Charly 
Hansen, John 
Hansen. M. 
Hansen. Sigvarth 
Johansson, Aigot 
Johnson, Gunnar 
Jensen, H. -1555 
Johansson, Victor 
Jensen, Jens 
Jordan, Henry S. 
.Tnhanson, T. 

KB, August 
Johansson, Geo. W. 

-1219 
Jensen. Edvard 
Johansen, Emll 
Jnhanson, Geo. 



Johnson, Edvard A. 
Jonsen, Leonard 
Johansen, Chas. 
Kallberg, Arvld 

Kolodzie, Geo. 
Kron, K. 
Lancoske, J. C. 
Lauritzen, Ole 
Lutzen, Valdemar 
Lister, W. 
Lalan, Joe 
Lindsberg, C. 
Larsen, L. K. 
Lindholm, A. 
Lindholm. Chas. 
Matson, Johan 
Mikalsen, Andreas 
Martin, John B. 
Mourlce, F. 
Malm, Gustaf 
Moberg, Karl 
Nyhagen, Julius 
Nohr, Niels 
Nllsen. Hans L. 
Olsen, John 
Olsen, Ludvig 
Olsen. Olaf 
Owen, Fred 
Olsen. HaraM 
Petterson. A. K. 
Peterson, K. ES. 
Petersen, Hugo 
Peterson, N. 
Petersen, Aage 
Pearson, Ben 
Parsons, Olaf 
Petterson, Oscar F. 
Rogis. A. 
Renvall, Anshelm 
Skaanes, Eigil 
Svenr.ingsen, S. N. 
Stromsberg. Ivar 
Rvenson. Nirk 
Sevenson, Paul 
Strahle, ("has. 
Sievers, G. P. 
Thompson. Tommy 
Tamisar. P. 
Toren, Gustaf A. 
Uhllg, Richard 



-90S 



Honolulu, H. T. 

Anderson, John E. Nelsen, C. F. 

Burk, Harry -1284 Petersen, Carl 

Crantly, C. W. Peters, Walter 

Eugenio, John Reither, Fritz 

Ekelund, Rickhard Solberg, B. P. 

Ivertsen, Slgvald B. Strand, Conrad 

Lengwenus, W. L. Thompson, Emll N. 
Moller. F. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Daniel William Thorin is inquired 
for by his mother. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify Fru 
Thorin, Hegagata 7, Gothenborg, 
Sweden. 9-23-14 

Carl Fritjof Johansson Lind, age 
39, a native of Sonderborg, Germany, 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, is in- 
quired for by his brother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify John Lind, 1401 West 9th St., 
Cleveland, Ohio.— 3-24-15. 

Frederick Wood, a seaman, sailing 
on the Pacific Coast, is inquired for 
by his sister, Miss Lucy Wood, 10& 
Broughan street, Darlinghurst, Syd- 
ney, N. S. W., Australia. He is de- 
scribed to be tall, with dark curly 
hair and carries a scar on the nose. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
kindly notify the office of Chief of 
Police, San Francisco, Cal. — 6-24-14. 

Waldemar Stintman, alias Broth, 
a native of Russia, age 21, supposed 
to be sailing on the Pacific Coast. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify his brother, John Stint- 
man, address Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific, San Francisco. 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Magnus Magnussen, a native of 
Soderhamn, Sweden, should at once 
communicate with F. A. Smith, Box 
770, Aberdeen, Wash. 9-23-14 

Martin Nielsen, a native of Den- 
mark, member of the Sailors' Union 
on the Pacific for the last 8 years, 
has not been heard of since July, 
1912. His address then was Sailors' 
Union, Seattle, Wash. Any one 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify George Leonhard, Sailors' Union, 
59 Clay St.— 8-11-1915. 

Olai Ingebrigtsen (Brock), a na- 
tive of Norway, last heard from 13 
years ago, when leaving San Fran- 
cisco for Australia on the American 
bark "Golden Gate," is inquired for 
by his brother. Any information re- 
garding the above named will be 
gladly received by Niels Ingebrigtsen, 
469 — 49th street, Brooklyn, N. Y.; or 
Sam Andersen, 100 Steuart street, San 
Francisco, Cal. — 8-4-15. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



Salmon prices for the season, based on the 
diminished pack in Alaskan waters, were issued 
at Seattle during the week by leading whole- 
salers and jobbers, opening at 5 cents per dozen 
cases higher for reds, sockeyes and medium 
reds and 15 cents per dozen less for pinks. 

Harry C. Lord, for twelve years Assistant 
Federal Inspector of the United States Steam - 
boat Inspection Service at Seattle, was notified 
by telegram from Washington, D. C, of his 
appointment as Inspector, to succeed Captain 
R. A. Turner, killed recently by the overturning 
of his automobile near Sultana, Wash. 

Officials of the Alaska Steamship Company 
are in the East trying to buy two and possibly 
three steamers for the Alaska trade to take the 
place of the "Dirigo" and the "Edith," both 
freighters recently lost. Two of the officials, 
J. H. Bunch, general freight and passenger 
agent, and R. R. Pearson, superintendent, are 
now in Philadelphia. 

The old marine railway, built for harbor use 
at Honolulu about thirty years ago, is to be 
demolished. This railway consists of a wide 
inclined track running down to deep water, or 
34 feet on the the edge of the harbor basin. 
The Territorial Government has let a contract 
to the Lord Young Engineering Company to 
remove the railway. 

Captain Paragon of the Peruvian bark "Alli- 
ance," complains of the methods of American 
tugs which he met outside Cape Flattery. He 
says that when the tugs found there was sick- 
ness aboard and the skipper was working the 
ship lone-handed they attempted to exact exor- 
bitant rates. Off Cape Flattery he induced a 
fisherman to come aboard to help and paid him 
$40 for two days' work. 

The Navy Department has refused to allow 
German steamers interned at Honolulu to anchor 
in Pearl Harbor. They are now in the open 
roadstead. An acute situation has developed. Ger- 
man Consul Rodeik says the steamers are not 
allowed sufficient coal to maintain an achorage 
outside the protection of the harbor limits. 
Several steamers still hold freight brought by 
them from German bases along the coast of 
China. 

An arrangement has been concluded between 
the Postoffice Department and the Oceanic 
Steamship Co. for an additional sixteen-knot 
American mail steamer between San Francisco 
and Sydney, Australia, via Pago Pago, Samoa, 
and Honolulu. This will result in a sailing from 
San Francisco every three weeks instead of 
every four weeks, beginning Oct. 26. The three 
ships used will be subject to the call of the 
government for use as auxiliaries. 

Captain John F. Blain, assistant manager, an- 
nounced that in order to test the possibilities of 
utilizing pulverized coal as fuel for marine boil- 
ers, the Pacific Coast Steamship Co. plans to 
charter a tug in the near future and with it 
conduct a series of elaborate experiments. Pow- 
dered or pulverized coal is used by a number of 
large eastern railroads and has been found to 
be superior to other forms of coal fuel, but it 
has never been tested in marine boilers. 

W. Van Doom, representative of the Holland- 
American Line in the United States and Canada, 
declares that his company is onlv awaiting the 
close of the European war before operating 
freighters and passenger vessels between Holland, 
Atlantic coast points and San Francisco. He 
said the freighters would be first placed in com- 
mission and that the passenger boats would 
follow. His company, he said, was at present 
building new ships for the Pacific Coast trade. 

The "Ellington," a twenty-knot motor cruiser 
intended to chase smugglers of Chinese, was 
launched at San Pedro on September 9 under 
ihe auspices of the officials of the United States 
immigration service. The vessel, which is sixty- 
two feet long and equipped with a one-pounder 
rapid-fire gun, was christened by Hilda Fitz- 
gerald, aged 3, a granddaughter of Anthony 
Caminetti, United States Commissioner of Im- 
migration. Another vessel for the immigration 
service is still on the ways. 

The steamer "Grace Dollar," which went 
ashore near the mouth of the Siuslaw river sev- 
eral days ago, arrived at San Francisco with a 
cargo of lumber. It has not been determined 
what damage was done in striking the bottom. 
Although Captain Fosen sent out calls for help 
when the steamer struck, he succeeded in get- 
ting clear unaided, before it was possible for 
life-savers to arrive. He said that the depth 
of water at the mouth of the river must have 
been several feet less than shown on the charts, 
and soundings are to be taken to determine if 
the channel is filling up. 

Six steamers of the Union Steamship Com- 
pany of New Zealand have so far been taken 
over by the Government to serve as troopships, 
all of them having made visits to San Fran- 
cisco and other ports of the Pacific Coast 
(luring recent years. One of the six, the "Ma- 
kura," is now en route from Vancouver to 
Sydney, and will be turned over upon arrival. 
The other vessels chartered by the Government 
arc the "Maheno," "Waihene," "Tahiti," "Wil- 



lochra" and "Manganui." After the war several 
of these vessels will again ply between San 
Francisco and the Antipodes. 

Advices have been received from the north 
that Captain D. H. Smith, owner of the convict 
ship "Success," may sell that vessel. Captain 
Smith plans to make his home on the Pacific 
Coast, and for that reason may offer the ancient 
craft for sale. The "Success" was here for sev- 
eral months, and for many weeks the crowds, 
which visited it on holidays and Sundays were 
over 10,000 a day. After being here, the vessel 
left for Portland, early last month, and so great 
were the crowds visiting her that several Port- 
land capitalists made a proposition to Captain 
Smith to take over the vessel. 

Three new freighters with large cargo capaci- 
ties will be in service between the Atlantic 
Coast and the Pacific within a few months, 
when the vessels now under construction at 
Sparrow Point for the American-Hawaiian Com- 
pany are launched. All three vessels will be of 
4000 net tons' register, and the first, the "Flori- 
dan," is to be launched and ready for her 
maiden trip to this Coast December 15th. The 
other two freighters are the Artisan and the 
Arborean, the first of which will be completed 
March 1st and the second May 1st of next 
year. The "Floridan" will be 414 feet long, 
fifty-three feet beam and thirty-one feet depth. 

The average load of the 983 laden vessels 
which passed through the Panama Canal during 
the fiscal year ending June 30, 1915, was 5,055.7 
tons, and the average for all vessels, laden and 
in ballast, in that time was 4,567.8 tons. During 
the fiscal year the number of vessels which 
passed through the Panama Canal carrying 
10,000 or more tons of cargo was 41. The 
largest cargo was 12,040 tons, consisting of 
sugar and general produce, carried by the 
"Alaskan" through the Canal on June 25, on 
the way from Hilo to Delaware Breakwater. 
Of the 41 vessels, 28 ships, or 68 per cent., 
were in the service of the American-Hawaiian 
Steamship Co., operating in the U. S. coastwise 
trade. 

Chief Officer Otto Schutt and six seamen of 
the American barkentine "E. R. Sterling," of 
Seattle, all of German birth, are prisoners of 
war at the Australian detention camp at Liver- 
pool, near Sydney, N. S. W., according to advice 
received here. The "E. R. Sterling," which was 
formerly the "Everett G. Griggs" and is the 
only six-masted barkentine afloat, sailed from 
Winslow, Wash., Nov. 21, 1914, for Sydney with 
a cargo of lumber. After discharging her ship- 
ments the vessel shifted to Newcastle, N. S. W., 
where she loaded coal for Callao. It was while 
lying at Newcastle fully laden and ready to put 
to sea that officers of the Australian navy 
boarded the vessel and placed Chief Officer 
Schutt and his shipmates under arrest. The 
charge against them was that they were Ger- 
mans. The "E. R. Sterling" sailed from New- 
castle July 10. The vessel will probably load 
sugar on the West Coast for Vancouver, B. C. 
J. I. Brittain, U. S. consul general at Sydney, 
N. S. W., has made a report of the arrest and 
detention of Schutt and his shipmates at New- 
castle and an investigation a.s to their citizen- 
ship is being made in Seattle by the Department 
of Commerce. 

The industrial outlook is more optimistic on 
Vancouver Island, due to the fact that the 
provincial government, in co-operation with the 
Department of Trade and Commerce, has suc- 
ceeded in establishing connection with various 
departments of the Imperial British Government 
by which they have secured for the British 
Columbia mills seven cargoes of lumber, totaling 
over 20.000,000 feet. These orders will result 
in the circulation of a quarter of a million dol- 
lars through the sawmills, logging camps, mer- 
chants, and shipping interests. The cut of logs 
for the past three months is just as large as for 
the same period last year before the war started. 
This is unique, as, except for the production 
of munitions of war, very few industries in the 
world have maintained their production. As 
many camps, and possibly more, are running 
now as there were last year. Some 7,000,000 
feet of logs, mostly low-grade cedar and hem- 
lock, are being exported every month, thus 
affording relief for the surplus cutting at the 
logging camps and giving emploment to men 
who otherwise would be idle. The provincial 
treasury also derives a revenue from this source 
of $9,000 monthly. In the sawmill branch of 
this industry the owners complain of poor prices 
for their products and lack of transportation, 
and state that the seriousness of the latter is 
shown by the fact that in the three months, 
April, May, and June, 98 lumber-carrying vessels 
were chartered by American interest on the 
Pacific Coast and only two by the Canadian. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants' Exchange Bldg., Third Floor. Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone Kearny 
394. (Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS- 
FEDERATION. 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary, 

570 West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass, 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway St 
NEW YORK CITY, 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St 
NORFOLK, Va., 41 Loyalls Lane. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 South Commerce St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 12 South St. Telephone 2107 

Broad. Night Call 2108 Spring. 
New York Branch, 400 West St. Telephone 5153 
Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 258 Commercial St 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 117 Decatur St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 806 South Broadway. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 
Headquarters (temporary): 
BOSTON, Mass, 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
NEW YORK, 51 South St. and 280 West St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway. 
NORFOLK, Va., 41 Loyalls Lane. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 190 West St. Phone 4126 Worth. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 15 Twelfth St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 445 La Salle Ave. 
DETROIT, Mich., 27 Jefferson Ave. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
HEADQUARTERS: 
406 N. Clark St., Chicago, III. 
Telephone Main 365. 
BRANCHES: 
Buffalo, N. Y. Toledo, O. 

Cleveland, O. North Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Milwaukee, Wis. Superior, Wis. 

Ashtabula, O. Erie, Pa. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 59 Clay St. 

Branches: 
VANCOUVER, B. C, 213 Hasting St., E. corner of 
Hasting and Main, P. O. Box 1365, Tel. Seymour 8703. 
I'M i 'MA. Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 
SEATTLE!, Wash., 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65. 
13B3RDBJBN, Wtosh., p. O. Box 6. 
PORTLAND, Ore., 44 Union Ave., North. 

i IK \. Cal., 227 First St., P. O. Box 64. 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67. 
HONOLULU, II. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sis.. 
P. O. Box 314. 

(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 
BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



PAUL SCHARRENBERG Editor 

I. M. HOLT Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 | Six months - - - $1.00 

Advertising Rates on Application. 

Changes In advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 

To Insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postofnce as second- 
matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 

B9 Clay Street. San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
anri address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions "i correspondents, nor for the return 
■ if manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 15. 1915. 



THE LANGUAGE TEST. 



Rules and regulations construing the mean- 
ing ni' the new Seamen's law arc now be- 
ginning tn see the light of day. < >nly a few 
have reached the far West, except by the 
wires of the Associated Press, and it is 
significant thai all of these official interpreta- 
tions of the law have been received with 
great rejoicing by the reactionary press. 

Regulations covering the language test pro- 
visions of the new law have been issued in a 
circular Utter by the Department of Com- 
merce under the signature of Acting Secre- 
tary Sweet. They were sent to Customs 
Collectors and Shipping Commissioners in a 
circular calling for information as to what 
additional machinery will he needed for their 
enforcement. 

The law provides that vessels, except on 
rivers and small inland lakes, shall not he 
cleared from any port in the United States 
unless they have on hoard "a crew not less 
than 75 per cent, of which, in each depart- 
ment thereof, are able to understand any 
order given by the officers of such vessel." 

The circular letter sets forth that "the 
1 'epartment construes the words 'able to under- 
stand any order given by the officers of such 
vessels' to mean the necessary orders that 
may he given to members of the crew in 
department in the course of the performance 
of their duty." Under this construction, it 
has been suggested, it will not he necessary 
for a sailor to understand the orders usually 
given to firemen or vice versa. 

That this interpretation of the language 
test runs entirely contrary to the spirit and 
intention, if not to the letter of the law, will 
he admitted by all impartial observers. The 
principal reason for the adoption of the 
so-called language test was not ( as has been 
charged by the cheap labor crowd) to drive 
coolie labor from American ships hut rather 
to make the entire ship's crew availahle for 
emergency work in case of collision, fire or 
stranding. 

If Chinese or Japanese firemen on an 
American passenger steamer an- to he re- 
quired to understand only such order- as per- 
tain to their duties in the fireroom they will 
obviously he useless for such work as launch- 
ing of lifeboats, etc. 

Disasters too numerous to mention furnished 



the hasis for the language test in the Sea- 
men's law. And if departmental rulings, in- 
spired by such faithful servants of the 
shipping interests as Messrs. Chlcr and 
Chamberlain, can practically nullify the very 
intents and purposes of an act of Congress 
it is merely another indication that the 
struggle hetween safety and dividends is a 
never-ending contest. 

If the language test were to he applied 
in a similar manner to the various city fire 
departments there would he some most as 
tonishing results. In San Francisco, for 
example, the various units of the fire depart- 
ment consist of a number of well-trained 
men. a hose wagon, a truck and an engine. 
There are hosemen. truckmen and engine- 
men, each especially trained to their particular 
duties hut above all trained to work to- 
gether effectively and efficiently under lieu- 
tenants, captains and the "chief." Can any- 
one imagine an "efficient" tire department with 
truckmen understanding only the commands 
pertaining to their duties in connection with 
the truck, enginemen only the orders re- 
lating to the engine, and hosemen only those 
words and phrases dealing with their im- 
mediate duties as hosemen. 

( )f course, no sane man would think of 
advocating such an arrangement. But there 
stem to he many "safe, sane and eminently 
respectable" persons who think that saving of 
life and property at sea can he conducted 
under just such conditions with a three- 
language crew. 



AND STILL THEY COME! 



Three Danish vessels of a total tonnage of 
7.26S pmss were admitted to American registry 
during the week ending August 21, making 159 
vessels of 559,763 gross tonnage admitted since 
enactment of the Registry Act of August 18, 
1914. — Press item. 

The foregoing innocent announcement by 
the Bureau of Navigation was not promi- 
nently displayed in any "Great Dailies" 
knifing the new Seamen's law. 

That kind of news does not match with 
the editorial views of the wise and learned 
patriots who write silly nonsense about 
the rapid decline of the American Merchant 
Marine; therefore news of such character 
is cither entirely suppressed id- hidden in 
the advertising columns. 

I Jut it is a cold and irrepressible fact 
that the United States Merchant Marine is 
growing and not declining. It is not only 
growing, it is actuallj performing record- 
breaking stunts I see official statistics 
printed elsewhere in this issue). And the 
upward climb of tonnage under American 
register absolutely refuse-. t<> stop, although 
it is plainly hinted in most "responsible 
and respectable" journals that the very 
opposite ought to take place em account of 
the La Follette Seamen's Act. 

Now, it does seem very ungentlemanly 
tor certain shipowners to continue trans- 
ferring foreign tonnage to the American 
flag. They ought to realize that Willie 
Hearst's celebrated artists have only re- 
cently completed several splendid cartoons 
showing plainly that the policy of the 
present Administration is driving American 
ships from the ocean. 

Nave these shipowners no brains? Don'1 
they know that, according to Hoyle, Hearst 
and Co.. the darned old Seamen's bill 
ought t ■ . kill the American Merchant 
Marine ? 

\ cs, sir. something is wrong somewhere. 
Either Mr. Hearst is wandering in darkness 
or a great many hard-headed business men 
have gone completely insane. 



NO PARDON FOR FORD AND SUHR. 



It is to be regretted that [. VV. W.isni 
has practically forced the Governor of Cali- 
fornia, for the present at least, to decline 
further consideration of Labor's appeal for 
executive clemency in behalf of Ford and 
Suhr, the two hop pickers who arc serving a 
life sentence as a result of murder committed 
at a protest mass meeting on the Dursl ranch, 
at Wheatland. Cal.. on August 3, 1913. 

Governor Johnson in a public statement 
reviewing the case asserts that none of the 
principles for which Labor contends have 
been violated by the prosecution or punish- 
ment of these men. Neither does he think 
the records of the cast- show ford and Suhr 
innocent of murder. Still, the Governor hints 
there are extenuating circumstances and that 
he might he inclined to shorten their terms of 
imprisonment if it were not for the coercion 
in the shape of L W. W. threats to resort to 
violence, sabotage and arson unless ford ami 
Suhr are promptly released. 

The ( rovernor's language upon the latter 
phase is frank, clear, concise and worth 
quoting. I te says : 

Government would he a futile and a con- 
temptible thing if it yielded to the threats that 

are now abroad in these eases. Of course, it 

will he said by sympathetic and well-meaning 
people that Ford and Suhr are not responsible 
for tlie utterances or the preachment or the 
practices of tlu-ir organization. If, however, a 
man walked into an official's office and at the 
point of a pistol demanded the release of a 
friend in prison, little would he thought of the 
official who would yield to that threat, and 
to-day the 1. W. \\\. in the name of Ford and 
Suhr, are demanding publicly, upon penalty of 
the destruction of the great farming and fruit 
industries of the State of California, the libera- 
tion of these men. 

While an official with a due sense of responsi 
hility and a retrard for his oath of office could 
not pardon the defendants, the conditions of 
the hop-picking ramn at Wheatland, prloi to 
the homicide, which justified the most vigorous 
protest, ih' peculiar circumstances surrounding 
the slaying of the district attorney and the 
others, the mode of entry of the officials at thai 
particular hour, upon the mounds, the possi 
liility that the defendants did not foresee the 
awful consequences of their acts, are all pi 
ful factors in urging a commutation of thi 
sentences imposed. 

Mi.se considerations have not been without 
influence; and it might he that they and a survey 
of the entire ease, while not authorizing I 

don, would justify a mitigation of the sent 
imposed; hut so long as in behalf of i 
the threats of injury and sabotage contimii 
long as the preachment exists in their behalf in 
the Stair of California, so hum a- incendiarism 
is attempted, 1 will neiih ,isten to appeals for 
executive clemency, in behalf of Ford and Suhr. 
nor in any fashion consider the shortening of 
their terms of imprisonment. 

The Governor's public statement with ref- 
erence to Ford and Suhr will gain in force 
and weight when considered in connection 
with a similar statement issued not long ago. 
In the midst of his recent campaign for re- 
election powerful and influential political in- 
terest- sought to force the Governor's hand 
in giving liberty to the notorious Abraham 
Ruef, ex-boss of the so-called Union Lahor 
party of San Francisco. The Governor's 
reply to that political pressure is entitled to a 
place among the classics. And whatever may 
he the individual differences of opinion upon 
Governor Johnson's attitude toward either 
case, no one can justly accuse him of yielding 
to coercion or persuasion for the relea 
the rich ami politically influential convict 
any more than he does for the poor and 
friendless prisoner. 

The Journal disagrees absolutely with the 
Governor about the guilt of the two martyred 
hop pickers. All through history it has been 
the policy of the vested interests to "get" the 
ring leaders. Special punishment has ever 
beefi meted out to the poor fellow who had 
the courage of his conviction in espousing 
the cause of the lowly. Ford and Suhr were 
merely two ring leaders of a "mob" seeking 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



redress from intolerable conditions. They 
were the spokesmen for unorganized and 
grossly exploited workers. Unfortunately, 
six men ("three workers and three officers of 
the law) lost their lives in the deplorable 
mix-up on that sun-baked ranch, near Wheat- 
land. And when organized society looked 
about for some one to appease the wrath 
of an outraged community which had lost 
three respected and honored officers of the 
law, Ford and Suhr were very naturally 
chosen as the victims. 

The Journal further disagrees with Cali- 
fornia's Chief Executive upon the fairness 
and impartiality of Ford and Suhr's trial. 
The part taken in the preliminaries, i. e., 
the gathering ( ?) of evidence by one of the 
most notorious and unscrupulous private de- 
tective agencies, is too well known and needs 
no rehearsal at this time. Surely, there must 
be room for an honest difference of opinion 
upon that issue. 

But with regard to the Governor's refusal 
to act while all California is under threat 
from the I. W. W. arson brigade, we must 
admit that it was the only manly way left 
open for his reply. 

Regardless of the guilt or innocence of 
Ford and Suhr no self-governing people can 
afford to submit to such contemptible meth- 
ods as are advocated and practiced by I. W. 
W. disrupters, and a Republic's chief execu- 
tive who would cower or cringe under such 
coercion and threats is not the kind of man 
Labor wants in office. 

The I. W. W. threats now made against 
the people of California have a familiar sound. 
Every bona fide labor organization worthy of 
(he name has at some time been threatened 
with disruption and extinction by some T. W. 
\Y. spieler. The I. W. W. weekly organ 
(printed in a non-union shop) constantly 
urges the tearing asunder of the existing 
American labor movement in order that the 
impossible theories of I. W. W.ism may have 
a free playground upon the ruins. And it is 
a well-known fact that some of the poor de- 
luded fanatics of the working class who grasp 
at anything that holds out hope and imme- 
diate reward have actually practiced I. W. W. 
destruction upon the very homes and meeting 
halls of their fellow workers. 

Xo, the working .-iass can least afford to 
countenance I. W. W. methods. It is better 
to leave two innocent men in jail and suffer 
the fate of martyrs, for the time at least, than 
to submit to the rule of the torch. 

The organized workers of California will 
not forget Ford and Suhr. Some day in the 
not far distant future the prison gates will 
be opened for them. But that liberty will not 
be secured by senseless, ruthless destruction 
of property. It will come rather as a result 
of Labor's earnest, patient and legitimate ef- 
forts to secure simple justice for two men 
who were made victims of a vengeful com- 
munity through circumstances over which 
they had little or no control. 



.Many splendid Labor Day editions were 
issued this year by America's labor press. 
The "American Federationist," in particular, 
is entitled to special mention. Every trade- 
unionist who wants to keep abreast of the 
times should read that splendid array of arti- 
cles grouped under "Labor's Mission — the 
Achievement of Freedom," in the September 
"Federationist." 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Journal's ad columns. 



ABLE-SEAMEN CERTIFICATES. 

In order to carry out the provisions of the 
Seamen's Act as to the number of able- 
seamen to be carried on vessels clearing from 
United States ports after November 4, Act- 
ing Secretary of Commerce Thurman has 
written to Collectors of Customs advising 
them that the department wishes as soon 
as practicable a list of the vessels subject 
to the law (100 tons or upward) together 
with the number of the deck crew of each. 
The Department of Commerce wants these 
lists so that it can arrange for the examina- 
tions as to eyesight, hearing and physical 
condition of able-seamen, and for the issue 
of certificates to such, and to enable the 
clerks to determine approximately the num- 
ber of such examinations and certificates re- 
quired for the several seaports. At present 
no physical examination of seamen is re- 
quired. Under the new law the following 
physical defects act as a bar: Broadly im- 
paired vision, color blindness, deafness, epi- 
lepsy, insanity, severe chronic cardiac af- 
fections, hernia, severe varicose veins, open 
tuberculosis, or any chronic defect which will 
materially interfere with the discharge of the 
duties of an able-seaman. 

Moreover, able-seamen certificates will not 
be issued to applicants who have not been 
successfully vaccinated against smallpox with- 
in five years. If the applicant has not had 
typhoid or has not been inoculated against 
it, he will be advised to be so inoculated. 

Needless to say, it is to the personal and 
material interest of each seaman to familiar- 
ize himself with the provisions of the new 
law. This may be done, (first) by attending 
the educational meetings held from time to 
time as announced, and (second) by securing 
and reading all available literature upon the 
subject. The available literature is given 
away free at the headquarters and branches 
of the respective Seamen's Unions and may 
be had for the asking by the unorganized as 
well as the organized seamen. 

The educational meetings are also open 
to all. Non-union seamen are especially in- 
vited to attend these meetings. 

Don't take your information from the 
boughten press. There is more stale de- 
liberate misinformation published about the 
new Seamen's law than the Journal, as a 
weekly publication, can possibly answer. But 
every new misstatement and every additional 
distortion is promptly analyzed and dissected 
in these columns. 

Therefore, for your own sake, read your 
own paper and the pamphlets issued by the 
Union. Don't neglect the regular weekly 
meetings where your own personal business 
is considered and disposed of. And finally, 
come to the educational meetings and per- 
suade your shipmates to do likewise. 



It is a hopeful and most encouraging sign 
that the churches are showing a deep interest 
in the legislation giving freedom to seamen. 
Andrew Furuseth spoke at the First Congre- 
gational Church of San Francisco on Friday 
last. The editor of the Journal addressed 
tin- Firsl Congregational Church of San lose 
on Sunday preceding Labor Day, and has 
been asked to speak upon the same subject 
on Friday of this week, to the "Men's Club" 
of St. John's Presbyterian Church at San 
Francisco, 



OFFICIAL. 



SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 7, 1915. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., Ed. Andersen presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping fair. A number of fishing ves- 
sels arrived from Alaska during the week. R, 
Townsend was elected Agent of the Victoria, 
B. C, Branch, which was ordered re-established 
by referendum vote of the Union. 

San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 13, 1915. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., E. A. Erickson presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping fair. Full Shipwreck Benefit 
was awarded to eleven members of the crew of 
the steamer "Edith." The following were elected 
delegates to the sixteenth annual convention of 
the California State Federation of Labor: Ed. 
Andersen, Gus Ekman, E. Ellison, Erank John- 
son, Marry Ohlsen and Paul Scharrenberg. 
JOHN H. TENNISON, Secretary pro tern. 

.Maritime Building, 59 Clav St. Phone Kearny 
2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 6, 1915. 
Shipping dull; prospects poor. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
213 Hastings St., E. corner of Hastings and 
Main. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 7, 1915. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull; pros 
pects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 7, 1915. 
Shipping .md prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 7, I'M 5. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

J. PEARSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 7, 1915. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

IACK ROSEN, Agent. 
44 Union Ave. North. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 7, 1915. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

|i)HN ANDERS* >N, Agent. 
227 Eirst St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 7, 1915. 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
\2%y 2 Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 

Honolulu Agency, Aug. 30, 1915. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

JACK EDWARDS* >N, Agent. 
1'. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Labor will never realize its rights until 
it recognizes its wrongs. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept 10, 1915. 

No meeting; no quorum. Shipping fair; a 
great number of cannery vessels arrived from 
the Alaska fishing grounds. Shipwreck Benefits 
were ordered paid to eleven members wrecked 
on the S. S. "Admiral Watson." 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

42 Market St. Phone Kearny 5955. 

Seattle Agency, Sept. 2, 1915. 
Shipping slow; plenty of men ashore. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock. Room 203. I'. O. Box 214. 
Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 1, 1915. 
No meeting. Shipping fair; plenty of men 
ashore. 

HARRY POTHOFFj Agent. 

P. O. Box 54. 

Portland Agency, Sept. 6, 1915. 
No meeting, Shipping fair. 

TIP )\1AS BAKER, Agent. 
HO Second St. X. Phone Broadway !306 



DIED. 

\V. I. Bergstrpm, Mo.. 2182, a native oi Fin 
land, age 27. drowned at sea from the schooner 
"Louise" bound from Honolulu to Aberdeen, 
Wa ih., Aug. 15, 1015. 



1 >i inand the union label upon all purch. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



CAUSES OF LABOR UNREST. 
(Continued from Page 2.) 



ployes would be merely that of the subjects of 
benevolent industrial despots." 

The Rockefeller Foundation. 

Concerning the Rockefeller Foundation the 
following statements are made: 

"The control of these funds has been widely 
published as being in the hands of eminent edu- 
cators and public-spirited citizens. In the case 
of the Rockefeller Foundations, however, not 
only is the control in the hands of Mr. John 
D. Rockefeller, Jr., and two of the members of 
the personal staff of Mr. John D. Rockefeller, 
Sr., who constitute the finance committee, but 
the majority of the trustees of the funds arc 
salaried employes of Mr. Rockefeller or the 
Foundations, who are subject to personal dicta- 
tion and may be removed at any moment. 

"The funds of these Foundations are largely 
invested in securities of corporations dominant 
in American industry. The policies of these 
Foundations must inevitably be colored, if not 
controlled, to conform to the policies of such 
corporations. 

"The funds of the Foundations represent 
largely the results either of the exploitation of 
American workers through the payment of low 
wages or of the exploitation of the American 
public through the exaction of high prices. The 
funds, therefore, by every right, belong to the 
American people." 

That the entrance of the Foundation into the 
field of industrial relations menaces the national 
welfare is explained as follows: 

"The documentary evidence in the possession 
of the Commission indicates: 

"That the so-called 'investigation of industrial 
relations' has not, as is claimed, either a scien- 
tific or a social basis, but originated to pro- 
mote the industrial interests of Mr. Rockefeller. 
The original letter inviting Mr. \V. L. Mackenzie 
King to associate himself with the Rockefellers 
stated that Mr. Rockefeller and Mr. Greene in 
'their purely corporate capacity as owners and 
directors of large industries' desired his aid. 

"That the investigation forms part of what 
Mr. Rockefeller, in a letter to Mr. Ivy L. Lee 
(the press agent of the Colorado operators), 
called the 'union educational campaign,' which 
is referred to by Mr. Bowers as 'the fight for 
the open shop,' the results of which are clearly 
manifested in the conditions existing in the 
camps of the Colorado Fuel & Iron Company, 
conducted on the 'open shop' principle. 

"That Mr. Rockefeller planned to utilize in 
this campaign literature containing statements 
which were known to him at the time to be 
untrue and misleading (as for example the 
numerous misstatements in the 'Sermon to 
Young Men' of Dr. Newell Dwight Hillis, in- 
cluding the statement that the Colorado oper- 
ators offered to recognize the miners' union), 
and also literature containing statements which 
constituted a malicious libel upon a large body 
of American citizens — for example, the follow- 
ing statement of Prof. John J. Stevenson: 
'Labor unions defy the law but are ever ready 
to demand its protection; their principles are 
no better than those of the India Thugs, who 
practiced robbery and murder in the name of 
the goddess Cali.' 

"That the investigation of industrial relations 
is not being made in good faith, inasmuch as 
its director states that he will not now nor 
hereafter make public his findings regarding a 
most important part of his investigation, namely, 
the investigation in Colorado. The purpose of 
Mr. Rockefeller to influence the public press is 
clearly shown by the employment of an ex- 
perienced publicity expert as a member of his 
personal staff, and is indicated by his evident 
interest in the ownership or control of a number 
of publications, of which we have records dating 
from the inquiry of his secretary regarding the 
Pueblo Star Journal in May, 1913, to the ex- 
tensive conferences regarding a loan of $125,000 
to finance The Nation's Business, the organ of 
the National Chamber of Commerce, which was 
established and given a semi-official status 
through the instrumentalities of the Secretary 
of Commerce and Labor, with the sanction of 
a former President of the United States." 
Colleges Controlled by Wealth. 

Evidence is further cited to show attempts 
by Rockefeller to influence the New York 
Bureau of Municipal Research. In regard to 
control of colleges by wealth the following is 
said: 

"In June of this year two professors, known 
throughout their professions as men of great 
talent and high character, were dropped from 
the positions they had occupied and no valid 
reason for such action was made public. Both 
were witnesses before the Commission, and 
made statements based upon their own expert 
knowledge and experience which were given 
wide publicity. One was a professor of law in 
a State university, who had acted as counsel 
for the strikers in Colorado; the other a pro- 
fessor of economics, who had not only been 
active in fights in behalf of child labor legis- 
lation and other progressive measures but had 
recently published a work comparing the income 
paid for property ownership with the income 
paid for all classes of service. 

"In the case of the State university we know 



that the coal operators in conjunction with 
other business interests had gained the ascen- 
dancy and exercised a great degree of control 
over the former Governor of the State, that the 
coal operators were bitterly opposed to the pro- 
fessor in question, and that the dismissal of 
the professor had been publicly urged by the 
operators upon numerous occasions, and we 
have the uncontroverted statement of the pro- 
fessor that he had been warned that if 
he testified before the Commission he would not 
be reappointed. In the case of the professor in 
the other university (which, though privately 
endowed, receives large appropriations from the 
State) we know that its trustees arc interested 
in corporations which have bitterly opposed 
progressive legislation, and are men whose in- 
comes are derived from property ownership and 
not from service." 

Injustice toward labor organizations on the 
part of courts is described and legal remedies 
suggested. The Clayton Act is declared insuf- 
ficient, and the British Trades Disputes Act 
recommended. Violence in labor disputes is 
attributed to arrogance on the part of the 
stronger party, and to denial of the right to 
use peaceful methods. Peaceful settlement be- 
comes difficult when employers deny the right 
to organize, refuse to consider complaints, or 
refuse to meet authorized representatives of 
workers. Workers are at fault when they in- 
dulge in internal dissensions or issue ultimata 
allowing no time for consideration and negotia- 
tion. 

Free Speech and the Police. 

Concerning free speech the report says: 

"One of the greatest sources of social unrest 
and bitterness has been the attitude of the police 
toward public speaking. On numerous occa- 
sions in every part of the country, the police of 
cities and towns have either arbitrarily or under 
the cloak of a traffic ordinance, interfered with 
or prohibited public speaking, both in the open 
and in halls, by persons connected with organ- 
izations of which the police or those from whom 
they received their orders did not approve. In 
many instances such interference has been car- 
ried out with a degree of brutality which would 
be incredible if it were not vouched for by re- 
liable witnesses. Bloody riots frequently have 
accompanied such interference and large num- 
bers of persons have been arrested for acts of 
which they were innocent or which were com- 
mitted under the extreme provocation of brutal 
treatment by police or private citizens. . . . 
Such action strikes at the very foundation of 
government. It is axiomatic that a government 
which can be maintained only by the suppres- 
sion of criticism should not be maintained." 

Legislation is recommended to prohibit inter- 
ferences with the constitutional rights of citizens. 
The Colorado Strike. 

A special report on the Colorado strike by 
George P. West disproves the claim of John D. 
Rockefeller of having no knowledge of events 
that led up to that trouble. It further quotes 
evidence to show control in Colorado by the 
mining corporations of State and local govern- 
ments. Regarding Rockefeller it says: 

"During all the seven tragic and bitter months 
that preceded Ludlow, Mr. Rockefeller wrote 
letter after letter in enthusiastic praise of men 
whose acts during this period had precipitated a 
reign of terror and bloodshed. It was only 
when the Ludlow massacre filled the press of 
the nation with editorial denunciation, when 
mourners in black silently paraded in front of 
his New York Office, when cartoons in the 
conservative press pilloried him and his father 
before an angry public, that at last complacency 
gives way to concern in his letters and tele- 
grams to Denver. 

"Mr. Rockefeller's responsibility has a signifi- 
cance beyond even the sinister results of his 
policy in Colorado. The preversion of and con- 
tempt for government, the disregard of public 
welfare, and the defiance of public opinion 
during the Colorado strike must be considered 
as only one manifestation of the autocratic and 
:inti-social spirit of a man whose enormous 
wealth gives him infinite opportunity to act in 
similar fashion in broader fields. Mr. Rock- 
efeller writes to Mr. Bowers: 'You are fighting 
a good fight, which is not only in the interests 
of your own company, but of the other com- 
panies of Colorado and of the business interests 
of the entire country.' 

"And Mr. Bowers, with whom Mr. Rockefeller 
obviously is in full sympathy and agreement, 
writes letter after letter picturing the growth 
of trade unionism as a national menace against 
which the business men of the nation must com- 
bine. 'Now for the campaign of 1916' and be- 
yond, is the slogan with which one of these let- 
ters closes, and Mr. Bowers is unsparing in 
criticism of a President who would tolerate a 
former official of a labor union in his Cabinet." 

Page after page of evidence is produced to 
show subjection of the State authorities to dom- 
ination of the Colorado Fuel and Iron Com- 
pany. The fact is mentioned that the author- 
ities who prosecuted John R. Lawson and 
others have taken no steps to prosecute Lieu- 
tenant K. E. l.iiulerfelt of the Colorado Na- 
tional Guard, or others who participated in the 
l.udlow massacre. 



MONOPOLY— THE COMMON ENEMY. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases ! 



Among the wounded in recent fighting at 
the Dardanelles is Captain Josiah Wedgwood. 
How serious his injury is has not been re- 
ported. The greatest loss which war inflicts 
on any country is the destruction of men who, 
but for war, would be engaged in freeing 
their country from evils worse than any that 
war can avert. 

Josiah Wedgwood was for years engaged 
in the fight to free England from its worst 
enemy, Land Monopoly, and not even the 
stress and strain of physical warfare has 
blinded him to the real danger against which 
his countrymen should be fighting. He makes 
this clear in an interview reported by H. P. 
Boynton, the Cleveland newspaperman, as 
follows: 

"England's greatest menace is not Ger- 
many," says Wedgwood, "but the fact that 
we have been starving a large part of our 
population in order that, another part may 
live in luxury. We have been breeding two 
races of human animals. One race averages 
five feet two inches in height and works in 
factories. The other averages six feet high 
and plays cricket. It is on the first class that 
the chief burden of the war falls, and the 
second class gets all of the benefit. 

"A country is not free unless its men can 
work for themselves and get the product of 
their labor. So long as the land is all in the 
hands of a few, this will not be possible. 
Why do I think the land is important? I 
will tell you. 

"After the Boer war I was military gover- 
nor of the city of Ermelq, South Africa. It 
was thronged with destitute nun, yet there 
were thousands of acres of unused land 
around it and an abandoned coal mine. 

"I decreed that all men might work this 
land and mine the coal without interference. 
From that time on men were free in Ermelo. 
because they could work for themselves and 
get the product of their labor. The employed 
workers were free, too, for they had the op- 
tion of quitting and working for themselves 
if they saw fit. Wages rose to $5 a day and 
employers complained of a scarcity of help. 

"I did this as a matter of military neces- 
sity. What necessities the present war may 
lead to I do not know, but I have hopes. 
Certainly men will never have full strength 
nor heart to fight for a country unless that 
country is theirs in fact as well as name." 

It is not only in England that the war is 
causing loss of men whom Humanity can not 
well spare. Every recent number of "Boden- 
reform," the magazine of the German land 
reform movement, has turned rules for one or 
more co-workers who have fallen in battle. 
It is sad to think that Englishmen like Wedg- 
wood and Germans like Schrameier, instead 
of standing shoulder to shoulder in warfare 
against the common enemy of both English 
and German people, should be engaged in try- 
ing to murder each other in a quarrel that is 
not of their making. How much better it 
would have been had they insisted that all 
the fighting be done by the men who made 
the war, or by those who hold the legal title- 
to the land of the countries concerned. 



According to the annual statement on 
the production of mineral waters in 1914, 
now available for distribution by the Geo- 
logical Survey, 54,358,466 gallons of min- 
eral water was sold during the year. This 
quantity came from 829 commercial springs 
and had a value of $4,892,328. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



THE COST OF PREPAREDNESS. 

(By Clyde H. Tavenner.) 



The increase in the cost of our Army and 
Navy in the last 20 years is enough to 
stagger the imagination and bewilder the 
senses. The cost of our Army and Navy 
is greater in proportion to its size than that 
of any other nation on earth. The increase 
in cost is absolutely abnormal when con- 
sidered in proportion to the increase in our 
population, or the increase in wealth, or 
when considered with the increased cost of 
preparation for war in other countries in 
time of peace. In this connection it is le- 
gitimate to ask to what extent the awful 
increase in cost is due to the systematic 
agitating of the possibility of war by those 
who profit financially from the ever-in- 
creasing expenditures of the military 
branches of our Government. 

In the last 30 years our population has 
increased 85 per cent., our wealth 185 per 
cent., and our expenditures 400 per cent. 

During the 15 years prior to the Spanish- 
American war our annual appropriations for 
the Navy ranged from $14,000,000 to $30,- 
000,000, and for the Army less than $25,- 
000,000, averaging for both less than $50,- 
000,000. 
. In 1883 our appropriation for the Navy 
was $14,903,559; in 1890, approximately 
$20,000,000; in 1914, $140,000,000! Our 
appropriations for the Army and Navy 
combined for the ensuing year will be in 
the neighborhood of $240,000,000. 

During the year 1912 our entire revenue, 
not including postal receipts, amounted to 
$702,000,000. Of this we expended $654,- 
000,000 to defray the entire expense of 
the Government; $444,000,000, or 67.88 per 
cent., was paid out for war and on account 
of war. Just before the outbreak of the 
present European war Germany was spend- 
ing 55 per cent, of her revenues for war 
and on account of war; Japan, 45 per cent.; 
Great Britain, 37 per cent.; and France, 
35 per cent. 

Our Army contained 91,416 men; Navy, 
52,757 men. German Army, during the 
year indicated, contained 870,000 men ; 
Navy, 66,783 men. Japan : Army, 250,000 
men; Navy, 51,054 men, with a reserve 
naval force of 114,000 men; Great Britain: 
Army, 254,500 men ; navy, 137,500 men. 
France: Army, 720,000 men; Navy, 60,621 
men. 

Great Britain's revenue was greater than 
ours by nearly $300,000,000, but our ex- 
penses for war and on account of war 
were more than $100,000,000 greater than 
hers. Yet the aggregate of her army and 
na\ \ was nearly four times as great as 
ours. 

Germany's revenue exceeded ours by 
$60,000,000, but our expenditures for war 
and on account of wars exceed hers by 
more than $50,000,000, yet her army is 
more than eight times as large as ours. 

The revenue of France is more than 
$233,000,000 greater than ours, but our ex- 
penses for war and on account of wars is 
nearly $150,000,000 more than hers, not- 
withstanding her army is eight times as 
large as ours and her navy excels ours by 
10,000 men. 

Although our revenue is nearly two and 
one-half times that of Japan, yet her 
army is nearly three times as large as 
ours with a naval force nearly four times 
the size -of ours, yet our expenses for 



war and on account of wars is more than 
three and one-half times that of hers. 
How the cost of our Navy is soaring: 

1883 $ 14,903,559 

1893 23,543,267 

1894 22,104,061 

1898 33,003,234 

1899 56,098,783 

1900 48,099,969 

1903 78,856,363 

1908 98,958,507 

1909 122,662,485 

1910 136,935,199 

1911 131,410,568 

1912 126,405,509 

1913 123,151,538 

1914 140,718,434 



THE ABSORPTION OF ALCOHOL. 



The nature of the tolerance acquired to- 
ward such substances as tobacco, opium 
and alcohol will not be clearly understood 
until the physiologic behavior of the active 
compounds present in these typical habit- 
forming products is more precisely known. 
Inasmuch as alcohol is perhaps the most 
widely used of all substances toward which 
a considerable degree of tolerance seems to 
be established, its performances in the liv- 
ing organism deserve careful consideration. 
The conditions under which it gains en- 
trance into the circulation, the concentra- 
tion in which it travels through the body 
and appears in the circulating fluids, and 
the speed with which it is oxidized or ex- 
creted, as the case may be, deserve investi- 
gation. 

A chapter in this story written by Voltz 
and Dietrich, of the Institute for Fermenta- 
tion Industries at Berlin, is commented on 
in a recent issue of the Journal of the 
American Medical Association. They have 
found that the rate of absorption of alcohol 
is noticeably higher in animals that have 
been accustomed to alcohol than in those 
which have never received any. The differ- 
ences between the two groups are not in- 
considerable. At the end of an hour after 
the intake, they may be represented by 
such figures as 66 and 87 per cent., respect- 
ively. The speed of disappearance of al- 
cohol is also somewhat greater in the in- 
dividuals accustomed to that substance. In 
this respect, however, the differences are 
by no means so conspicuous as in relation 
to the comparative rates of absorption. 



It does not require any elaborate social 
philosophy or great discernment to know 
that a wage of $3 a day and a workday of 
eight hours in sanitary workshops are bet- 
ter than $2.50 a day and a workday of 
twelve hours under perilous conditions. 
The working people will not stop when any 
particular point is reached; they will never 
stop in their efforts to obtain a better life 
for themselves, for their wives, for their 
children, and for all humanity. The object 
is to attain complete social justice. — Samuel 
Gompers. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



A recently completed census puts the 
population of Sweden at 5,679,607. Mar- 
riages and births are shown to be decreas- 
ing to such a degree that the births in the 
past year are fewer in proportion than at 
any time during the 170 years in which 
Sweden has had vital statistics. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above stated 
reasons, or because of rules of the so-called 
"Welfare Plan," by any agent or represent- 
ative of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied concerns, including the 
masters and officers of the ships. 
Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 

LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 

570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 

BRANCHES AND AGENCIES: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 15 Twelfth Street 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

HEADQUARTERS : 

71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 445 LaSalle Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS : 
406 N. Clark St., Chicago, III. 
Telephone Main 365. 
BRANCHES: 
Buffalo, N. Y. Toledo, O. 

Cleveland, O. North Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Milwaukee, Wis. Superior, Wis. 

Ashtabula, O. Erie, Pa. 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

MARINE HOSPITALS: 

CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 



RELIEF 
Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Mich. 
Houghton, Mich. 
I.udlngton, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 

::rie. Pa, 
Menominee, Mich. 



STATIONS: 
Ogdensburg, N. Y. 
Oswego, N. Y. 
Port Huron, Mich. 
M.-mitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mil h 
Sandusky, O. 
Sault Ste. Mari' 
Sheboygan, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



10 



D ).\ST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



millions of dollars in taxes that had been 
dodged before. They exposed the trust 
newspapers who occupied school lands at 
ridiculously low rentals whereby hundreds 
ot" thousands of dollars were lost to the 
school board every year. They exposed 
these large corporations in the Legislature, 
showed them up in their true light. 

"In the last Legislature, in the very last 
hour of its session, by some hocus pocus 
arrangement, the Senate appointed a com- 
mittee to investigate the school board, but 
which has turned out to be a committee to 
] > 1 1 1 the Teachers' Federation out of busi- 
ness." 

Securing Eight-Hour Day. 

Through the efforts of A. 1'. of I., organ- 
izers, thousands of working girls in Bridge- 
port, Conn., are included in the eight-hour 
movement. Nearly 4,000 of these workers 
employed by the Warner Brothers' com- 
pany secured the shorter workday after a 
short strike. 

The La Resista Corset Company has 
signed a similar agreement with its em- 
ployes and rates will be adjusted so that 
these girls will receive the same pay for 
forty-eight hours that they formerly re- 
ceived for fifty-five. Other gains include 
thread at cost, no charges for repairs, and 
recognition of the shop committee. 

Women employes of the Crown Corset 
Company and the George Batcheller Com- 
pany have secured concessions. 

Women core makers employed by the 
Crane Company have secured the eight- 
hour day, a 10 per cent, wage increase, and 
gnition of their shop committee. 

.Men workers are continuing their eight- 
hour progress and many international 
unions have assigned organizers to assist 
in this w r ork. 

Three strikes in as many boiler shops 
were settled by the managements granting 
the 50-hour week in place of the 55-hour 
schedule, effective about a month hence, 
when contracts can be adjusted on that 
basis. 

The absence of armies of strike-breakers 
has made it possible for the numerous 
strikes to be conducted in a peaceful man- 
ner. Special Agent George A. Parsons, 
who is investigating strikes in this city for 
tlie Connecticut Bureau of Labor Statis- 
tic-, said: "Nothing like this has ever hap- 
pened anywhere in Connecticut before, and 
I don't think such a condition has been 
experienced anywhere else in the country." 



Score Organized Charity. 

( (rganized charity opposes mothers' pen- 
sions and has found a way to hamstring 
this, legislation, was the charge made by 
Judge Henry Neil, of Chicago, in a speech 
to churchmen in Spokane, Wash. Judge 
Neil is known as the originator of Mothers' 
Pension law. He said : 

"In Xew York, Illinois, Minnesota and 
nearly all the other mothers' pension States 
organized charity has induced the Legisla- 
tures to prevent deserted mothers getting 
pensions on the plea that pensions to such 
mothers would increase desertions. 

"It is a well demonstrated fact that char- 
ity gets most of its funds by appeals based 
on the destitution and suffering of innocent 



children ; so if all poor children were taken 
care of by the mothers' pension system, 
publicly administered, there would be little 
suffering left. 

"Now, when a mother and her children 
are deserted, organized charity sends out 
begging letters telling of their great dis- 
tress and asking rich people to send money 
to help relieve the distress, deploring the 
fact that these mothers cannot get a pen- 
sion, when charity itself went to the Legis- 
lature and prevented her getting a pension. 

"Surely, charity does not claim that it 
provides the same amount as the pensions, 
for then there would be no reason for 
charity preventing the destitute deserted 
mother and her children getting the pen- 
sion, except to get the 75 per cent, rake-off. 
I ask. why pauperize the deserted mother? 
Will some expert please answer why?" 



Naturalization Don't Count. 

Naturalization of an Italian in another 
country does not exempt him from military 
service in Italy, is the statement made by 
Secretary of State Lansing, who announces 
that so far as his department is advised, 
Italy has always maintained this attitude. 
Mr. Lansing says the State Department is 
unable to give any assurances that the nat- 
uralization of the Italians in the United 
States would protect them from impress- 
ment into the Italian army if they return 
to Italy. The Secretary's statement was 
in the form of a circular addressed to at- 
torneys in Wheeling, W. Va., acting for 
unnaturalized Italians employed there, who 
wanted to know what their status would 
be if they returned to Italy. 



Extend Eight-Hour Rule. 

Acting Secretary of the Navy Franklin 
1). Roosevelt has sustained the position of 
the A. E. of L. metal trades department 
that the Federal eight-hour law should 
apply to torpedo-boat engines manufactured 
by sub-contractors. The law gives heads 
of Government departments power to buy 
supplies in the open market regardless of 
the hours employed in the manufacture of 
these supplies. The unionists have held 
that torpedo-boat engines are built under 
special specifications and are not a com- 
modity as generally understood. 

Acting Secretary Roosevelt has sustained 
this position and has written the following 
letter to Secretary Berres of the metal 
trades department: 

"Referring to your inquiry of the 19th 
instant concerning the department's deci- 
sion on the question as to whether the con- 
struction by the Xew London Ship and En- 
gine Company, as sub-contractors of the 
Electric Boat Company of the engines for 
submarine boats for the Navy is to be re- 
garded as eight-hour w f ork, I have to advise 
you that on the l'Hh instant the department 
addressed to the Electric Boat Company a 
letter, saying : 

"Heretofore the department, following 
opinions of a preceding Attorney-General, 
has held that the engines for submarines 
under construction by your sub-contractor, 
the Xew London Ship and Engine Com- 
pany, were excepted from the eight-hour 
rule by the second section of the act, as 
being materials or articles that may usually 
be purchased in the open market and not 
of a kind customarily manufactured by the 
Government, but the view of the Attorney- 



General set forth in said opinion makes it 
plain, as you will see upon perusal thereof, 
that the engines of submarines fall within 
the eight-hour restriction, and not within 
tin- exceptions therefrom of the second sec- 
tion of the act. 

"'It is requested that you inform your 
sub-contractor, the Xew London Ship ami 
Engine Company, of the foregoing and in- 
struct that company to observe the re- 
quirement of the eight-hour law in the con- 
struction of the engines they are now 
building for submarine boats under con- 
tract with vou for the Navy.' " 



Hillyer's Removal Upheld. 

W. [[. Schofield, an attorney of Denver, 
has written an open letter to Speaker 
Stewart, of the Colorado House of Repre- 
sentatives, because of the lattcr's protest 
against the removal of Judge Hillyer by 
the Supreme Court from further considera- 
tion of miners' trials. 

The Speaker also favors a law that will 
limit the power of the court to act in cases 
where prejudice is alleged. Attorney Sco- 
field upholds the Supreme Court and say-: 

"At the outset let me say that I hold no 
brief for the miners of this State in their 
controversy with the operators. Whether 
either or both have been guilt}- of acts of 
violence is not material here; but when 
either side demands justice of our courts 
they should have it. 

"\\ hat object can any man or set of men 
have in wanting any particular judge to sit 
in any particular case or cases? If the 
man or men seek justice, the fact that a 
judge is disqualified for being prejudiced 
cannot hurt their case. The judge should 
not be interested in sitting in any particu- 
lar case, for his salary goes on at the same 
rate, whether he tries one case or a thou- 
sand, just as yours would, Mr. Stewart, 
were you absent from a session of the 
House. 

"But you say. that under the rule an- 
nounced, the judges of the State are made 
subject to aspersions upon their character. 
The statute does not so read. It uses the 
term prejudice and that is the term the 
court construes in its opinion." 



A recent ( >rdcr in Council announcing 
increases of pay for lower deck ratings 
■ in British submarines conveys the inter- 
esting information that the Admiralty have 
found it necessary to employ ratings below 
that of able seaman. Hitherto no rank 
inferior to able seaman has been included 
in the crew of an underwater craft, the 
work being of such an important nature 
that only picked men were so employed. 
Apparently it is now desired to give the 
lower ratings an opportunity of becoming 
proficient in submarine work. The Ad- 
miralty announce that "it is considered 
necessary" to employ ordinary seamen, or 
equivalent ratings, and boys, the former to 
be paid at the rate of Is. 6d. a day, as com- 
pared with Is. 3d. on board a ship, while 
the boys arc to receive 9d. a day, as com- 
pared with 7d. 



Andrew Furuseth is correct in saying that 
the hr>t argument in favor of the Sea- 
men's law is "the safety of passengers." 
But some men engaged in the busines 

owning ships believe in "profits first, pas 
sengers last."- San Francisco Star. 



COAST SEAMEN'S ' JOURNAL 



11 



THE LABOR MOVEMENT IN JAPAN. 

(By K. K. Kawakami. ) 



The recent arrival in San Francisco of 
two labor delegates from Japan has awak- 
ened among those interested in the labor 
movement much interest, not unmingled 
with curiosity, in the labor question in 
Japan. Americans have heard little, if at 
all, about labor organization in Japan. It 
is even questioned if there is really a 
labor union in that far eastern country. 

Strictly speaking, there is no labor union 
in Japan, if we are to interpret the term 
as American labor unionists would in- 
terpret it. This is due to the misguided 
policy of the Japanese Government. The 
Government has been reluctant to recog- 
nize the worth of organized labor, and in 
more instances than one tried to discourage 
or interfere with the growth of trade- 
unionism. 

For this peculiar attitude of the Gov- 
ernment the originators of the labor move- 
ment is perhaps partly, even largely, re- 
sponsible. As I was one of the first men 
who were actively engaged in organizing 
laborers in Japan, I feel I can speak with 
authority on this matter. 

It was some eighteen years ago that 
Japanese labor found an able champion in 
the person of Sen Katayama, who studied 
in America and who brought back to his 
native country the principles and ideas of 
American trade unions. He and a coterie 
of young men, of whom I was one, started 
a movement with a view to establishing 
labor unions. Fortunately or unfortu- 
nately these originators of the labor move- 
ment were all Socialists, and that was the 
main reason why the Government felt un- 
easy about it. 

Along with the launching of a labor 
movement we started a propaganda for 
socialism, and organized the Social Demo- 
cratic part)'. If the Government had just 
let us alone, nobody perhaps would have 
paid much attention to our propaganda. 
Hut the Government worried a great deal, 
and felt constrained to suppress the party. 
Thus the Government unwittingly acted as 
our publicity agent, for the moment the 
party was suppressed, the newspapers 
made heroes of us and placed us in the 
limelight. 

Ever since that period the Government 
has been unable to persuade itself that 
socialism and trade unionism are two dif- 
ferent things. It seems to think that trade- 
unionism, like socialism, challenges the 
very principle upon which the imperial 
regime is established. That, perhaps, is 
the cause of the troubles which labor or- 
ganization in Japan has experienced. And 
so the labor unions organized by Sen 
Katayama and his colleagues, all socialists, 
proved short-lived. 

But the enlightened men who are pilot- 
ing Japan's ship of state must certainly 
be capable of seeing trade-unionism with- 
out glamour. In the "Yu-Ai-Kai," or "La- 
borers' Friendly Society," which is repre- 
sented by the two labor delegates now 
here, we see the beginning of a more lib- 
eral policy of the Government as well as 
the birth of a labor union which promises 
to become both useful and influential. 

The "Yu-Ai-Kai" is not at present any- 
thing like a powerful labor union in Amer- 
ica. It has existed only a few years, its 
membership is small, and its financial 



strength is insignificant. Nevertheless it 
is an association organized for the enlight- 
enment of the laboring class and the pro- 
tection of its rights and interests. True, 
the organizer, Mr. Suzuki, who is one of 
the two delegates now in San Francisco, is 
not a workingman himself. But history 
tells us that men who awakened the work- 
ingmen of Europe and America from the 
torpor of ages were not laboring men any 
more than is Bunji Suzuki. Suzuki's chief 
mission in Japan is to inspire aspiration 
and awaken intelligence in the minds of 
the working people. The working men 
themselves do not yet understand their 
position, their importance and their poten- 
tial power. Suzuki is a pioneer with a 
new mission. And in carrying on that 
mission he is, in the existing circumstances 
in Japan, perhaps a better man than we, 
for he neither professes nor believes in 
socialism, the doctrine which impeded our 
Labor movement, though it made us unex- 
pectedly prominent. 

San Francisco, Sept. 14, 1915. 



KIND WORDS FROM SEATTLE. 



Labor's Economic Platform 



The other day an interesting ceremony 
took place on the steamer "Dolphin" just 
before she left her berth for southeastern 
Alaska. A gold watch and chain were 
presented to Victor Peterson, a sailor, for 
heroism in saving the life of one of the ves- 
sel's passengers, Miss Helen Kepner of 
Denver, Colo., at Haines, Alaska. 

In connection with this appreciation of a 

sailor's efficiency, this thought occurs: 

Would one of Robert Dollar's cheap-wage, 
poorly fed Lascar or Chinese sailors have risen 
to the emergency as did the union sailor, Pe- 
terson? 

Yet, in the attack on the Seamen's bill 
bv Robert Dollar and his kind, the plea is 
really made for ignorant, poorly paid, and 
comparatively inefficient Chinese sailors on 
the Pacific. 

To the Robert Dollars one might cite the 
case of the "Rio Janeiro," in which the 
Chinese crew, unable to handle the boats, 
was responsible for the drowning of pas- 
sengers. The contrast between the "Rio 
Janeiro" case and Sailor Peterson's splen- 
did example is a vital argument for the 
principles involved in the Seamen's law, 
which is meant to give the sailor living 
conditions and thus insure greater safety 
for passengers, too. — Seattle Star. 



When Miss Jane Addams said that this 
is a war of old men she meant that it was 
the work of the older school of politics 
rather than of the newer and theoretically 
better generation. But it is curious to 
note that nearly all the generals are old 
men. A correspondent of the New York 
"Sun" points out that Von Hindenburg is 
69, Von Buelow 70, Von Bissing 71, Von 
Heeringen 69, Von Mackensen 65, Von 
Kluck 67, Joffre 64, Pan 70, Kitchener 65, 
French 63, and Fisher 72. Old age, says 
this correspondent, is not considered as a 
disadvantage except in America, where 
there is a belief "that it is the oozing of 
the gray matter of the brain into the hair 
which makes the latter lose color." 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Journal's ad columns. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall he issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

International Seamen's Union 
of America 



(Continued from Page 5.) 



875 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 58 Commercial St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1408V 2 Western Ave., P. O. Box 
75. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 242 Flander St. 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 574. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 42 Market St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Pier No. 1, Room fi.1. P O. 
Box 214. 

PORTLAND, Ore., Room 10, Bickle Bldg., 27% 
Second St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 4!» Clay St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 81 Seneca St., P. O. Box 12. 
ASTORIA. Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

DDDnnDDDaaDnaDaDnaDaDnDDnnDDnDDDDD 

The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can i"- pr6cui > <i by seamen at 
any of the above-mentioned plai 

i. ,ii i In I,.! iters of the 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Labor News. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Office Phone 
Elliott 135 



The Gulf Refining Company of 
Port Arthur, Tex., has accepted the 
eight-hour principle and hereafter all 
work will be done on the shorter 
work-day plan. About 1500 em- 
ployes are affected. Many of them 
erly labored twelve hours a day. 

\s a result of conferences with 
officers of the Taunton, Ma<s.. Ma- 
chinist-' Union the Mason Machine 
Works' management announce that 
hereafter the hours of labor will be 
from 7 a. m. until ? p. m. five days 
of the week and from 7 a. m. until 
11:30 a. m. Saturday. The ten-hour 
schedule will continue. 

Organization made it possible for 
employes of the Wheeling. W. Va., 
Can Company to win a three weeks' 
strike, secure recognition as union- 
ists and improve working conditions. 
The company agrees to meet griev- 
ance committees and further :i 
that those workers who arc last em- 
ployed shall be laid off first during 
slack times. All employes an- re- 
instated without prejudice. 

President Wilson of the Pattern 
Makers' League of North America 
announces that the Cleveland local 
of this organization secured without 
strike the eight-hour day in all job 
shops, effective September 1. Over 
200 men are interested. The nine- 
hour day has been secured in Ra- 
cine, Wis. A general betterment of 
conditions throughout the country 
has been recorded during the past 
few months. 

Municipal authorities of Worces- 
ter, Mass, have resurrected an old 
ordinance and unionists are an. 
on the charge of "obstructing the 
streets." Jacob Levine, chairman of 
the organizing committee of the Cen- 
tral Labor Union, was arrested on 
this charge when addressing a 
meeting of shop men, and the or- 
ganized workers have appointed a 
committee to protect freedom of 
speech. Several speakers have been 
arrested within the past month, but 
the law- so far has only applied to 
meetings of workers. 

Detroit trade unionists declare 
they will oppose the proposed mu- 
nicipal ownership amendment to the 
city charter providing for municipal 
ownership unless a clause is in- 
serted guaranteeing arbitration of 
disputes with employes. Members 
of the local Federation of Labor's 
legislative committee point out an- 
other objection to the pro, 
amendment. This permits city offi- 
cials who manage the road to com- 
pel employes to take a civil service 
examination "and say you can come 
in. but must keep out of labor un- 
ions." 

The Philadelphia North American 
exposes the coal operators' claim 
that prices must be increased this 
winter because of a labor shortage, 
due to the war. The companies are 
storing huge stocks of coal and 
the paper says: "So far as labor 
goes, the only reservists who are 
going home to fight in any number 
are Italians, and there are very few- 
Italians employed in the anthracite 
mines. Most of the workers are 
Slovac, and the Slavs are finding it 
very difficult, indeed, to make their 
way back to Russia or Austria, even 
when they are anxious to go." An- 
other reason for the operators 
tivity is that the agreement between 
them and the miners will expire 
next April. 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-date methods in Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy. 
Compasses adjusted. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



PIER NO 1. 



Established 1890 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

ALASKA HOTEL 

CORNER WESTERN AVENUE AND 

SENECA STREET 

New Building— New Furniture 

26 cents and up per Day 

Special Rates Per Week. 

FREE BATHS 

PETER DESMORE, Proprietor 

SEATTLE 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 



Headquarters For 

Union Made Clothing 

FURNISHINGS, HATS AND SHOES 



At 



WESTERMAN &. SCHERMER 



( 220-222 
Two Storeej 103-105-107 



1st Ave. So. 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



Eureka, Cal. 



MERCANTILE LUNCH 

Is the place for a good and quick service 

233 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 

Teddy ® Hagan 

Proprietors 



VVVVVVwVVN^S^/vVVVVSA/VVVV>irVVVVVV «"^i#«v 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 

Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

612 Fourth St. - - Eureka, Cal. 



B0NNEY-WATS0N CO. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 

NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH 
Four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor In New York Nautical College. 

Room 4187 ARCADE BUILDING 

Next Room to Masters, Mates and Pilots 

Association 

SEATTLE, WASH 



Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mall forwarded 
during that period, they should notify 
gent to hold mall until arrival. 

Abrahamsen, Mann, Emil 

lliliitan Moyer, Wm. 

Andersen, Hjalmar Martensen. Ingoald 
Andersen, P. T. 
Berntsen. I5ernt 

r, Geo. 
Bucknam, J. W. 
Carlson. He] 



Martensen, Knist 
Martlnsohn. P. A. 

Mathisen, Martin 
Mathisen, Sigurd 
McNIell. Ross 



Christiansen, 

i 'luistensen. 



TrygoeMoen. Tryger 
Anton Mortensen, J. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squlre-Latlmer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers in Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

— or — 

A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 
EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



VVVVVV\A^<VVV»V^VV»rV^VVVVVVVVVVVSAyv« 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Chudelow, Geo. 
Edvords, John 
Eggers, John 
Engebretsen, Ed. 
Edverdsen, Anton 

m, Frank 
Frisch, reter P. 
Gilbert, Arthur 
Glademo. Lars 
Gundersen, Peter 
Gustnfson. Karl 

. Ales M. 
Hansen, John 
Hatton, Pete 
Hughes, W. L, 
Hansen, C. 
Howard, Geo. 
Jakobson, Walde- 

mar 
Jansewitch, John 
Jensen, Oscar 
Jensen. S. 
Johnson, Ed. 
Johnson, Emil 
.Torgensen. Fred 
Jacobean, Tenglls 
Johanson, Wm. 
Kalning, Jacob 
T.arsen. Alhln 
Larsen, John 
Larson, Pete 
T,araen, K. -1660 
Larson, L. A. 
Larson, Olaf 
Lelrdman, C. H. 
Leonard, John 
Lundberg, C. 
Liltten, Theo. 
Mjones. John 



Mikkelsen. K. -1620 
Moore, C. R. 
Nass. T. M. 
Neisen, Oscar J. 
Noherelt, Gust 
Nygaard, oiuf 
Olsen, C. E. 
Olsen, Edwin 
Olsen, O. 
Olson. J. E 
Olson, E. -966 
Olsen. Harald 
Olsson, C. 
Pestoff, Sam 
Petersen, A. -1223 
Petersen, Hugo 
Petterson, Harry 
Petersen. Carl M. 
Quains, Ni'k 
Quigle. R. E. 
Oulgley. Tom 
Ramberg. Barney 
Renstrom, A. G. 
Roos, Axel E. 
Sole. Erling 
Bchwelstous, W, 

Shankat. Hans 

Simmlnghjlm, G. 

Speller. I I 
Stone. C. T.. 
Teichert, Karl 

Thomsen. Elnar 
Thompson, Pete 
Torjusen, O. T. 
O. Ursin, Johannes 
Verkenstedt. Blllle 
Waagen. C. O. 
Wall. W. 
Wetland. John 



SAILORS' OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS, 
SAILORS' SINGLETS 

Everything Union Made 

PAGE & SCHWARTZ 

Cor. Second and E Sts., Eureka, Cal. 



w^/s/Vl>A/v^A»vvvvsrVV^ArV^/^A^vvvvv^A<v^AA/NA 



Tacoma Letter List. 

Cords, \V. A. ii. Martin B. 

Evertsen, Olof Paterson, John 

Fan-ell. William Person, Fritz I 

Haugan, Arthur nard 
Johannsen, Christian Schmidt, Louis 

W. Thomas. Paul 

T,ine. Wictor I'llman, Emil 
Murphy, Danlal 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Any member or members of the 
crew of the steam-schooner "Cuzco" 
who were on board of her in August, 
1912, at Victoria, R. C, when Joseph 
II. O'Brien met with an accident, 
are requested to communicate with 
George Olson, attorney and coun- 
selor-at-law, 300-308 Central Bldg., 
Seattle, Wash.— 4-7-15. 



Carl Kristianson, who shipped on 
the bark "Nuanu" in September, 

1912, from Honolulu to San Pedro, 
was on the bark "Allen" and 
schooner "Repeat" previously. Any- 
body knowing his whereabouts please 
notify his mother, Mrs. Anna Kris- 
tianson, Majornas, Route 6, M. 27, 
Lilla B. Nystrama St., Gothenborg, 
Sweden. 5-13-14 

Frank Melson, who went as fire- 
man on the S. S. "Maye" from Phila- 
delphia to New Orleans, in May, 

1913, is inquired for by his mother. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify Mrs. G. W. Paruin, 
4309 Westminster avenue, W. Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

George Barrett, who, on November 
12, 1912, left the ship "Port Logan" 
at Newcastle, of which he was an 
apprentice, is inquired for by his 
mother, his father having died. Any- 
one knowing the whereabouts of this 
lost son please at once communi- 
cate with Amelia Barrett, 1 Wood- 
land Place, East Greenwich, Lon- 
don, England. 3-3-15 

Otto E. Bickel and John Sherman 
Bickel, brothers, who have not been 
heard of for many years, are in- 
quired for by their sister. They are 
both tall, light complexioned, and blue 
eyes. Any information regarding 
their whereabouts will be highly ap- 
preciated. Please address Miss Laura 
Bickel, 1591 East Ninety-third street, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 4-14-15 

Knut Jensen No. 5018, a member 
of the Lake Seamen's Union, a 
native of Denmark, is inquired for 
by his wife, Lieschen Jensen, of 
Sangcmunde, A/Elbe Ostcncrweg, F. 
Germany. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify the Lake 
Seamen's Union, 133 Clinton street, 
Milwaukee, Wis. 4-14-15 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON, Prop. 



Eureka, Cal., Letter List 



Contreras, Julio 
Eriksen, Anton 
Lomas, Richard 



Lawrence, Harry 
Nilsen, Nils 
Thorsen, Fredrick N. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Johan Hilmar Hansen, a seaman 
who was last heard from in Seattle, 
Wash., in 1911, is inquired for by his 
father, Anton Hansen, Nygaten 34, 
Moss, Norway. 5-13-14 

Alex McDonald, formerly of Dun- 
dee, Scotland, who has not been 
heard of for 22 years, but is thought 
to be sailing on the Pacific Coast, 
is inquired for by Jas. Perry, 30 
Bridge End, Buckpool, Buckie, Eng. 

5-13-14 

Fred Riley, a colored seaman, last 
heard from at Genoa, Italy, and at 
other times from ports in Australia 
and at Liverpool, England, is sole 
heir to his mother's estate. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts kindly no- 
tify Mr. John E. Selkirk, Attorney- 
at-Law, 100 Erie Co. Bank Bldg., 
Buffalo, N. Y. 6-24-14 

Henry Smallwood, a native of New 
York, is inquired for by his mother. 
Anyone knowing his present where- 
abouts please notify the following 
address: Mary Smallwood, Academy 
of the Holy Name, 200 Fair Oaks 
Ave., Pasadena, Cal. 7-29-14 

Alfred Petersen Hilland, a native of 
Bergen, Norway, age about 44, is in- 
quired for by his brother, Randolf 
Petersen. Any one knowing his 
whereabouts please notify Sam An- 
derson, address 100 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 7-22-14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 



Portland, Ore. 
^.^OHNfsONT 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 
For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 

nnnDnnDDDnnnnnnnannnDnnDnn 



NEW AND SECOND HAND 
CLOTHING 

WEINER'S BARGAIN 
HOUSE 

Shoes, Hats, Suitcases 

Furnishings and Tools 

French Dry and Steam Cleaning 

UNION SHOP 

35 NORTH THIRD STREET 

Corner of Cauch PORTLAND, ORE. 



P. ROSENSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers in 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnslde, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. Main 8295 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 



SQUARE DEAL 

RESTAURANT 

Best Meals on the East Side 

$5.50 Meal Ticket for $5.00 

Phone East 406 

371 BURNSIDE STREET 

PORTLAND - - OREGON 

CON. SILVER, Mgr. 



Willamette Cigar Store 

H. SORENSEN, Proprietor 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, 

CONFECTIONERY, FRUIT AND 

SOFT DRINKS 

Corner Front and Burnside, 

Portland, Ore. 

DDnnnDnnDnnnnnnnnDnnanDDLX] 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 
DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 
no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 





Home 


N 


ews. 


. 



□nnnnnnnnnnDannnDDnnDannDnnnnnannnnnnnnnnnnDDDnnnnnnn 
a 

a 
□ 

c 

r. 



VOTE AGAINST PROHIBITION 



S^ggjggjjaan^a 



Union 

MADE 

Seer 




*% 



7Ue 

AND 

Porter 



DEMAND 



J?g&> Of America rG&r 

COPYRIGHT &TRADE MARK REGISTERED I9QS 1 



PERSONAL LIBERTY □ 

IN CHOOSING WHAT YOU [ 
WILL DRINK 

Ask for this Label when 

purchasing Beer, Ale 

or Porter, 

As a guarantee that it is 

Union Made 



R THIS IS OUR LABEL 

DnnDDnanDDDDDDDannnDDnnDnDDnnDDnnnnnDDDnnnDDnnDDDDaiiD 



Aberdeen, Wash. [ Port Townsend, Wash. 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Bese, F. 

Bernahrdsen, Chas. 
Bjornlund, Axel 
Bugge, Mr. 
Christensen, H. P. 
Decas, O. 
Dolany, Willie 
Edstrom, John 
Ekberg, Hugo 
Fernandez, Frank 
Geiger. Joe 
Hecker, Wm. 
Halbeck, J. O. 
Holmstrom, Chas. A. 
Henriks, Waldemar 
Ingelbrigsten, O. 
Jensen, Christ 
Jensen, Wm. 
Jegstrup, Harold 
Johnson, Nils 
Jonsson, Karl 
Knopp, Fritz 
Kristiansen, Wm. 
King, J. L. 
Kelly, Patric 
Kjer, Magnus 
Knudsen, Richard E. 
Larsen, H. 
Leon hard, George 
Letchford, A. 
Lindblad, Konrad 
Lindberg, A. C. 
Lindholm, John 
Loescher, Joseph 
Miller, E. 
McKeating, R. 
Munchmeier, H. 
Miller, Andy M. 
Morgan, Tim 



Muller, P. 
Metts, John 
Moller, L. D. 
McConnell, David S. 
Mark, Thorwald 
Meckermann, Ernst 
Neuling, George 
Nielsen, H. -1253 
Olsen, Arthur 
Ohlsson, J. W. 
Osterberg, Henry 
Oglive, Wm. A. 
Palm, P. A. 
Pedersen, J. A. 

-1515 
Perkins, Paul 
Peterson, M. 
Rabel, John 
Reskran, George 
Rinkel, H. 
Rimmer, Chas. 
Schneider, J. 
Schneider, Fritz 
Swanson, Emil 
Soderlund, Uno 
Sorensen, Jorgen 
Shea, Oscar 
Schacht, H. 
Schultz, John N. 
Selin, Joe 
Salmelin, H. 
Saarinen, W. 
Tuhkanen, J. J. 
Urso, Geozzep 
Vinx, H. 
Windblad, M. 
Wheatcroft. L. E. 
White, Harry 
Westengren, C. W. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Andersen, Andrew 
Arnell, John 
Burmeister, T. 
Byman, Alf. 
Bjorklund, G. 
Bowen, J. J. 
Davis, Frank 
Eriksson, -333 
Evensen, Krist 
Gronros, Oswald 
Gueno, Pierre 
Hansen, Halfdan 
Holmroos, W. 
Hansen, Ove Max 
Hylander, Gustaf 
Jacobson, J. 
Kristiansen, Nils 
Kustel, V. J. 
Larsen, -1804 
Ludtke, Emil 
Malmberg, Elis 
Maonado, Henry 
Munsen, Fred 
Nilsen. -1054 



Nilsen, Harry 
Nordgren, Chas. 
Paaso, Andrew 
Pettersen, Karl 
Petersen, J. 
Peterson, Nels 
Risenius, Sven 
Rundblad, Oscar 
Schmidt, Heinrich 
Simensen, Isak 
Scheftner, Bernhard 
Toves. H. C. 
Thorne, John 
Thompson, S. K. 
Udby, Harold 
Wiksten, Arvid 
Wilson, John 
Walder, Olsen N. 

Packages. 
Glazer, Y. 
Gorgensen, Olaf 
Hansen, John 
MacGuire, O. F. 
Stanners, W. S. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Adolf Krakan, last heard of at Port 
Pirie, January 1912, and again in 
March 1913, from Warumbo, 118 
miles from Adelaide, South Australia, 
is inquired for by his mother at 
Hamburg, Germany. — 8-25-15. 



HUOTARI a CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



When In Aberdeen Trade at 
BEE HIVE 

Very best union made Hickey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, 
Shoes, Underwear, Beddings, Tobac- 
cos, and notions for seafaring men. 
NYMAN BROS. 
304 South F St., Aberdeen, Wa»h. 
Near Sailors' Union Hall 
Open Evenings 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



TO LET 

Very Desirable, Light 
and Roomy 

Stores and Basement 

— in the — 

Maritime Hall Building 

— en — 

49-59 CLAY STREET 

Between Embarcadero & Drumm Sts., 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Apply to I. N. HYLEN, 49 Clav St. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Iwar Westerberg, age about 50, 
sailing second mate on some steam 
schooner on the Pacific Coast, is in- 
quired for by Gus Englund. Any in- 
formation regarding the above named 
will be gladly received at 214 Jack- 
son street, San Francisco, Cal. 

1-27-15 

Theodore Krakan, last heard of in 
September 1911, at New Orleans, La., 
is inquired for by his mother. Any 
one knowing his whereabouts please 
notify Mrs. Ad. Krakan, Langenvehm 
38 I, Hamburg 22, Germany.— 8-25-15. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

Water Street, Port Townsend 

Next door to Waterman & Katz 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Ingvald Andreas Hansen, alias 
Andrew Hansen, a native of Nor- 
way, age about 36; tall, dark; last 
heard of July, 1905. His address 
then was, Andrew Hansen, Karluk, 
Kodiak Island, Alaska. He is in- 
quired for by his mother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify Staff Captain Robert Smith, 
district officer, native work, Alaska, 
Box 925, Wrangell. 4-3-15 

Wilhelm Ekelund, a native of 
Sweden, is inquired for by his 
brother, Axel Ekelund, New Harbor 
Hotel, Drumm street, San Francisco, 
Cal. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify the above ad- 
dress. 3-10-15 

Patrick McFee, who was cook on 
board the schooner "Robert Henry" 
on a voyage to Mexico last year, is 
inquired for by the U. S. Shipping 
Commissioner, at San Francisco, Cal. 

9-15-15 

George Alexander Sharman, a na- 
tive of Brooklyn, N. Y. About 28 
years of age, height 5 feet 9 inches, 
supposed to have sailed on the Great 
Lakes in 1907, is inquired for by 
M. L. Kinvan, 1211 Mosher street, 
Baltimore, Md. 7-14-15 

Carl Janson, age 36, born in Was- 
tervik, Sweden; last heard of in Seat- 
tle six years ago. Anyone knowing 
his address please communicate with 
Erika Askenberg, 2280 86th street, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

George Alfred Hall, last heard of 
on the Sch. "Sehome" in June, 1913, 
will please communicate with his 
brother, Walter Hall. Address 790 
18th street, Oakland, Cal. 

William McGrail, of Baltimore, 
Md., who sailed on the Atlantic and 
Gulf Coasts as cook for a number of 
years, is inquired for by his brother, 
George McGrail, 603 Decatur street, 
New Orleans, La. 



A final estimate of the dead in the 
"Eastland" disaster in the Chicago 
River, July 24, is 852. 

The Supreme Court of the United 
States has declared the Eastman 
Kodak Company a monopoly in re- 
straint of trade. 

President Wilson has taken up re- 
ports of his Cabinet members on the 
allegations of the New York "World" 
concerning a German conspiracy 
against American neutrality. 

Gustav Klopsch, an employe of the 
Carnegie Institute, was arrested in 
Washington as a spy. Photographs 
and drawings in large numbers, of 
defenses all along the Atlantic Coast, 
are said to have been found in his 
possession. 

Mrs. E. H. Harriman has com- 
pelled the cancellation by the Mc- 
Keen Motor Company, of Omaha, 
Neb., in which she holds a control- 
ling interest, of a lucrative two years' 
contract for shrapnel recently ac- 
cepted by that firm. 

In Ohio County, Kentucky, sixty- 
four persons, some of them said to 
be the most prominent men in the 
county, have been charged with par- 
ticipation in night-riding outrages, 
ranging from maltreatment to mur- 
der, that have terrorized the county 
recently. 

The Bureau of Naturalization has 
issued a general letter relative to its 
views as to the course which should 
be followed in training the alien pop- 
ulation in American citizenship. The 
bureau points out the impossibility 
of laying down any hard or fast rule, 
but declares the prime requisite is 
ability to speak the English language. 
The gross operating revenues of 
railroads in the United States in the 
fiscal year ended June 30, 1915, 
amounting to $2,974,722,594, were 
$123,765,102 smaller than in the pre- 
ceding fiscal year. Nevertheless, the 
roads were able to effect such great 
economies in operation as to reduce 
operating expenses by $137,921,428, 
thus turning a loss in gross into an 
increase of some $19,000,000 in net 
operating revenues. 

Parcel post insurance limits have 
been extended from $50 to $100 by 
the Postoffice Department. In addi- 
tion, orders have been issued pro- 
viding for a minimum insurance on 
packages valued at $5 or less, at a 
cost of 3 cents. A fee of 25 cents 
will be charged to insure parcels val- 
ued up to $100. Formerly a fee of 
5 cents was charged for insurance on 
all parcels valued up to $25, and 10 
cents on all parcels valued up to $50. 
The 5-cent fee will be retained for 
parcels valued between $5 and $25, 
and the 10-cent fee for parcels rang- 
ing in value between $25 and $50. 

For the first time in its history, 
the United States leads the world in 
export trade. The exports of this 
country in the fiscal year ended June 
30 last were valued at $2,768,600,000, 
as compared with $2,170,100,000 for 
the United Kingdom. The change in 
positions was due more to the 30 
per cent, decrease in British exports 
than the 17 per cent, increase in those 
from this country. Exports of the 
United States in the five years 1910- 
1914 were worth $22.3.1 per capita, 
while imports were valued at $17.70. 
In a like period at the beginning of 
the century exports were valued at 
only $17.71 and imports at $11.59. 
The average increase in our total 
trade in the period was therefore 
more than 36 per cent. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




Ninety-four British vessels were 
Mink in July, and 140 lives were lost. 
Tin- list includes 16 sailing vessels 
and 4f> steamers sunk by German 
warships, and four steamers by 
mines. 

One enlisted man was killed and 
two were injured in an explosion 
Thursday on the destroyer "Decatur" 
at the Cavite Navy Yard, Philippine 
Islands, according to cabled reports 
to the Navy Department. 

The Baldwin Locomotive Works 
of Philadelphia has applied for per- 
mission to build a pier 500 feet long 
and 125 feel wide on the Delaware 

River at the foot of the company's 
property at EddyStone. The work 
v, ill cost about $250, 

"Columbia," the famous old yacht 
which twice defended the America's 
cup successfully, has been broken up 
at Philadelphia, and the metal will 
he used to make war munitions for 
the allies. The yacht is said to have 
cost more than $300,000 originally. 

Receipts of ore at Lake Erie ports 
in July were 5,822,040 tons, making 
the total received to August 1, 14,- 
388,615 tuns Conneaut leads all the 
ports in the amount of ore handled 
in July and for the season. Cleve- 
land is second and Ashtabula is 
third. 

Efforts to raise the British steamer 
"Desola," which sank in the harbor 
of St. John's. N. 1'., last winter, have 
been abandoned, owing to the fact 
that divers discovered that the vi S 
sel's plates had been destroyed by 
sulphuric acid, which had leaked 
from drums in the cargo. 

The U. S. torpedo-boat destroyer 
"Porter" was launched last Thursday 
at the yards of William Cramp & 
Suns' Ship and Engine Building Co.. 
Philadelphia. She is one of the six 
1,090-ton class of destroyers of which 
only one, the "Tucker." building at 
Quincy, Mass., remains on the stocks. 
French shipbuilders are now build- 
ing steamers fur British owners. The 
cargo-boat "J-3" has been launched 
at Rouen by the Chantiers de Nor- 
mandie, on account of Houlder, Mid- 
dleton & Co., London. The engines 
will be engined at the shipyards and 
delivered at the end of this month. 
She haN a deadweight capacity of 
12,500 tuns and a speed of 12 knots 
loaded. length 459 1/3 feet, breadth 
<>1 ' i feet, depth to upper deck 32 feet. 
Seven midshipmen have been rec- 
ommended for dismissal from the 
Xaval Academy by the acting super- 
intendent for hazing or for falsehoods 
in connection with the recent hazing 
investigation. Secretary Daniels has 
notified the accused midshipmen, of- 
fering them opportunities to make 
explanations. Their names were not 
made public. In addition to those 
recommended for dismissal, a large 
number were recommended for dis- 
ciplinary action for other objection- 
able conduct not amounting to hazing. 
The U. S. Navy will adhere to the 
three-gun turret for the new battle- 
ships, contracts for which are to be 
let before tin- end of the calendaf 
Apparently, the new battle- 
ships are to be very similar in con- 
struction to the "Oklahoma," which 
will be put in commission about 
ranuary 1. The probability is that 
they will be equipped with 14-inch 
i In- European war de- 
monstrates that it is worth while to 
increase the calibre of guns while 
decreasing the number, as an in- 
crease in calibre necessarily means 
fewer guns. 



SPECIAL NOTICE! 

Call or send for your Advertised Mail and 
Packages as early as possible. 



San Francisco Letter List. 

letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail Is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
I. M. Holt, Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 



Abbors, Arne 
Abmeyer, Henry 
Acorn, Albert 
Adams, Hugo 
Aim, Jack 
Alliens. Walter 
Akman, Joseph 
Albert, J. 
Albrecht, CI 
Aimer, John G. 
Andersen, Alfred 

Olal 
Andersen. H. J. 

-1620 
Andersen, John 
Andersen, N. -1649 
Andersen, Otto 



Anderson, lliUling 

Anderson, John G. 

Anderson, Joseph 

Anderson, O. L. 

-1363 

Anderson, P. T. 

-1461 

Anderson, Thos. 

Anderson, Walter 
Andersson, K. K. 

-1323 
Andersson, Victor 
Andreasen, Karl 
Andreassen, H. 

-1477 
Andresen, Anton 
Antonaen, n. -1372 



Anderson, Chr. -176BAntonsen, H. -1783 

Anderson, Bd Antonson, Viktor 

Anderson, Ernst Ashlund. Jas. H. 

Anderson, Fritz Augustin, Hermann 

Anderson, H. E. Azevedo. Manuel T. 



Babcock, I >iek 
Backman, Paul 
Bahrendts, Carl 
Bakkenson, P. J. 
Bakker. Haakon 
Ban, Martin 
Barrell, Ceorge 
Beier, Jans Chr. 
Beling, Oskar 
Bensen, I. -2164 
Benter, H. 
Bergsren, I. I... 
Bergstrom, Frank 
Berkllnd. (Jup 
Berntsen, Julius 
Berry. David J. 
Bertelsen. Krlstlan 
Biedeman. Aug. 
Biegger, Paul 
Rilke, E. -2049 
Billington, Martin 

Caen, P. 

Cainan, George I. 
Calson. Fred 

-11. D. C. 
Campbell, S. 

Arthur L. 
i !. B. 
Carlson, C. O. 
Carlson, C. R. 
Carlson, Joe 
Carlson, Julius 
Carlson. Martin 
Carlsson, John 
Carlstrom, Claes 
Catt, Frederick 
Cellan. John 

Dahlkvist. Fred 
Daly, John 
Daniel. J. C. 
Danielson, Eric 
De Baer. Harry 
Denis, I. 

Earllng. Gus 
Ebersole, R. E. 
Echlln. Lester W. 
Bckart, T. G. 
Eckhoff, Otto 
Eekstrand, Frank 
Edolf. C. 

Eisenhart, N. 
Eisner, Max 
Elenius, Axel 

EUassen, Sigurd 

Falcon, M. 
Fane, James 
Ferguson, B. 
Ferguson. J. 
Fisher, W. -707 
Fitzgerald, Wm. 
Fitzpatrlck. Potrick 
Fjellman, Jonas 
Fogartl, Otto 
Follan. Thomas 
Gabrielsen, Peder 
Gallagher, Jas. 
Gart, George 
Gerner, Hans 
Gertonson, Robert 
Gorden, George 
Granberg, Fred 
Grant, Dave 
Orant. Otto 
Grantley, C. W. 

s. Edward L. 
Gronthal. Arthur 
Gross, Ernest 
Hakansson, John 
Hall, H. 

Halvarsen, Henry 
Hammergren. Oscar 
llannus, Alex 
Hansen, A. -2010 
Hansen. Charlie 
Hansen, Christ 

en, C. M. 
Hansen. F.. -1735 
Hansen, H. 

Hans M 
Hansen. Hans O. 
Hansen, H. C. 
Hansen, H. P. 

i. K. -967 
n, L. P. 
Hansen. Martin 
Hansen. Norkard M. 
Hansen. Thomas 
Hanson Henrik 
Hass. Wilhelm 
Hauan. Karl 
Ikonem. Joe 
Ingebretsen. Olaf 
Insunso. Francisco 
Jahrllng, Herm. 
.Takobsen, Alfred 
Jansson, Jonas 
Jaroolnskt. Feliks 
Jensen, Carl 



Binder, Herbert 
Blurne, Earnest 
Brevick. Johan 
Blum, Ernest 
Boro. Severin S 
Bower, G. 
Bowman, Jack 
Boy, Geo. 
Bredemeyer. Elmer 

H. 
Brown, Jno. 
Brown, William 
Brunst, Frank 
Bruum, Aksel 
Brunvald. Ed 

3, Tomas 
Buckly, J. J. 
Burke, Andrew 
Bush, H. S. 
Byloff, Charles 

Christensen, Alfred 
Christensen, Hans 
Christensen, L. -1305 
Claus, John R. C. 
Clausen, Clin 
Clausen, Chr. 
Clausen, I. 
Coakley, Ji 

Cook, Harry 
Collier. H. S. 
Collins, 1-:. F. 
Comstedt. Ernst 
Corlon, R. A. 
CoBtnntinos. Lay 
Counted!. Ernest 
Crawford, F. 

Dewetrak. C. 
Dixen, Ben 
Dixon, John 
I louglas, G. Satn. 
Drnrar. Ed 
er, Jack 

Ellefsen. Otto 
Ellingsen. Fred 
Ellingsen, Wllhelm 
Emanuelsen, Karl 
Engi ilia nit, Ferdi- 
nand 
Erlckson, E. R. 
Erlckson. George 
Erlckson, John 
Evansen, Louis 
Evertsen, Olaf 

Forde, S. C. 
Foss, John 
Foster, Chas. 
Frazer. James 

holm, Chas. J. 
Fredriksen, Berger 
Fredrickson. F. 
Frledrlch, n. 
Funk. Burno 
Furlong, Peter 
Gudmundsen, B. 
Gulliksen, Amandus 
Gumaa, Nicholas 
Gunderscn, Kristian 
Gundersen, L. I. 
Gunderson, G. A. 
Gunderson, J. C. 
Gunderson, M. 
Gunther, Hans 
Gustavsen, O. 
Guthre. R. 
Gutman, C. 

Haugen, Hans C. 
Haupt, Fritz 
Hawkins, F. 
Hedenskog. John 
Heldt, Charles l". 
Helln. John 
Helsten, Gustaf 
HeiberKer. M. 
Henriksen, T. 
Hemes, L -2042 

ll.tman. Walter 
Higgins, F. 
Hilderhranch. A. 
Holbeck, O. 
Holberg. Oluf 
Hole Slgvald 
Holmquist. F. 
Holm. Arthur 
Hoist. R. 
Hord. Charlie 
Hoversen. Carl 
Tfuhner Carl 

Muse. Edward 
Isakson, Karl 
Iversen, Ivar 

Jensen, C. 
Jensen. H. 
Jensen. Hans 
Jensen. Hnlford 
Jensen, Henry 



n. Knud 
I, Nils Oluf 

ii Thoyus 
Willielm 
jen, Christ 

ii, V xel I I. 
Johansen, Carl J. 
Johanson, Edward 
Johannson, Nils 
Johansson, E. A. 
Johansson, J. R. 
Johnson, A. -JuTT 
Johnson, C. J. 

Kaleva, (Justaf 
Kallberg, Arvid 
Karison, Wiktor 
Kaspersi-n, Henrik 
Kinlock, Wm. 
Klrrowaky, Adam 
Kleblngat, F. 
Klepzig, Otto 
Knonl, Louie 
K nappe, Adolph 
Knudsen, Daniel 

Laakso, Frank 
Lacey, ThOB. E. 
Lake. A. F. -1670 
Larsen, Herman 
Larsen, J. -13b6 
Larsen, John 
Larsen, Julius 
Larsen, N. E. 
Larson, Alfred 

in, S. G. 
Larsson, Karl 
l.arsson, K. E. 
Larsson, Ragnar 
Langworth, H. E. 

l.atz. C. 

Laursen, Chris. 
Lawson, J P. 
Lebrun, Ernesl 

Maatta, John 
Macke, David 
Maeomber, H. B. 
Madden, T. 
Madsen, Ludvig 
Makew, W. 
Maki. Ivar 
Malland, O. 
Alt'. 
Manse. Peter 
Mariner, It. W. 
Markmann. Ileinr 
Markus. Bernhardt 
Marqueis, Frank 
Martens, H.. -188S 
Martens, P. -_^n^ 
Martenstn. J. C. 
2int 

Martin, A. 
Martin. H. 
Mathiassen, Sigurd 
Matta. Humberto 

Adolf 

John B. 

Albin C. 

Albert 

A lv in 

C. 

Ernest 

Ernest C. 

Fred 

John 

John B. 
Kristian 

I ha man 
en, Carl 
I'M win N. 

Nils 



Nagel, 
Ned sen, 

Nelsen, 

Nelson, 

Nelson, 

Nelson, 

Nelson, 

Nelson, 

Nelson, 

Nelson, 

Nelson 

Nerby, 

Nerkins 

Nielsen, 
Nielsen, 

Oberg, Oscar 

Mauritz 
O'Brien, R. F. 
Ohland, Chas. 
Oleman. Henry 
Olsen, B. O. L. 
Olsen, C, 1315 
Olsen, Charles A. 
Olsen, G. W. 



Johnson, Christ 

Johnson, E. G. -227 
Johnson, Emll 1788 
Johnson, Eric- 
Johnson. John 
Johnson. Julius 
Johnston, William 
Jones. Kertbon 
Jones, Joseph 
Jorgensen, Fred 
.lungherg. L. 
Junge, Helnrich 

Kohlmeister, Otto 
Kolk, M. 
Kolod, Aug. 
Konstatin, Anlst 
Korner, Fred 
Koski, Leander 
Koso, Petter 

Krishjan, Kail 
Krlstensen, K. D. 
Kristiansen, Jakob 
Kruk, J. 

Lee, Anker 
Leelkaln, -Martin 
Lelrevaag, H. J. 
i.< in. n, Lars 
Leverridge, ii. 
Lewald. Harry A. 
Lewis, Kobt. W. 
Llndh, Nils V. 
Liljendahl, Luiivij; 
Llndroth, Erik 
JJnk, Geo. 
Lofgren, Richard 
Lonau, John 
Lundberg, Charles 
Lundberg, Harry 
Lundberg, Torsten 
Lundgren, Colmar 
Lunsmann, Henry 

Mattson, Charles 
Mattson, Harry 
Mattson, J. 
McKeatlng, R 
McLaughlin, M 
McMahon, Jack 
McManus. J. 
Melba, Chas. 
Menk, Billy 
Mertensen, Henry 
Meyer, Ernest 
Meyer, F. 
Meyers, Max 
Miller, B. P. 
Moller, Louis 
Moore. Allien 
Monsen, C. 
Morgen, L. 
Moj • i . William 
Muller, Thorn 
Murphy, J. 

Nielson, Hans F. 
Nlemeyer. Oscar 
Nilsen, Hans F. 
Nilsen, Jolin 
Nilsen, <>. E. 
Nilssen, Harry 
Nilsson. Hjalmar 
Nor, Niels 
Nordlof, Sigurd 
Norman. Olaf 
Norris, N. A. 
Norton, Edgar 
Nunner. Albert A 
Nurmlnen, .1. E. 
Nyman, Oskar 

1 Usen, Ole, -1047 

Olson, C. K. 

Olson, C. O. -705 

Olson. E. W. -121G 

Olson. .1. 

Olson, Morten 

Olson, Nick 

Olson, 1'. 

Olsson, Adrian 



Olsen, John Arthur Olsson, Erie 



Olsen, John 
' Hsi n. Jorgen 
Olsen, X. -602 

olsen, O. 
I. 
Olsen. Olaf S. 



Para. E. H. 
Paul, Geon 

Paulman, Geo. 
Paulsen. Aksel 
Paulsen, N. 
Paultin, Martin 
Pedersen, Carl 
Pedersen. H. •1660 

n, W. G. 

i, Cliarles 
Persson. John 
Peters, Wm. 

II, H. 
Petersen, Hugo 
Petersen, Niels 



Ollsson. Carl 
Olsson, James 
Orlllng. Oust 
i isterholm, .1. W. 
llSSOwen. Fred 



Stlenen, John 
Stintman, J. 
Stolt, Axel 
stoi/. rman, E. 
Strand, Charley 
Strand. Koni.nl 
Strandqulst, Louis 
Stratten, Henry 
herg. O. 

Tamlsar. P. 
Tmiiiiian, K. 
Tanum, Helge 
Taucer, Charles 
Telshert, Karl 
Thompson, Johan 
Thompson, John 
Thomson, A. -853 
Thomson. G. E. 

Gus 
Thorn. August 
Uderkull. C. 
Van Frank. W. O. 
Yattnavv. Win. M. 
Vickery, Custis S. 
Warner, Wll 

Waldman, Edward 

Walker, Erlck 
Wallln, (Justaf 
Walter, John 
Wanag, J. 
Wang. E. 
Wee, William 
Wendel, Emll 
Wneatcroft, L. E, 
White, J. D. 
White, Peter 
Yejola, Yejo 
Zabel, Carl 
Zerket, B. W. 
Zunk, Bruno 



Substad. Pete F. 
Svendson, J. 
Svensen, Albeit 
Soensen. C. J. 
Bwanson, E 
Bwanson, Martin 
Svvanson, O. 
Szallies, Gustav 

Thorsen, Rolf 
Thorsen. Theodore 
Topel, Fred 
Tlerney, Pat 
Tollinger, A . 
Tonzel, ft, 
Traynor, John 
Trepte, A. 
Triedrich, H. 
Tuchel. Guslav 
Tuppltz, ( '. 
Ulman, John 
VlUemayer, Walter 
Vogel, Gus 

Whiteside, Fred 
Wick, John 
Wickstinm, Axel 
Wlhtol, J. 
Williams, J. < \ 
Wills. George 
Wilson. .1. W. 
w In ton. J. A. 
Witt. Ottn 
Wold. Olaf -1286 
■use, John 
Wremmer, George 

Zurenberg, Fritz 
Zweyoerg, John 



PACKAGES. 

Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 



Petersen, O. -1695 
Petersen, Otto 
Petersen, Peter 
Petersen, C. V. 
I '.i.i sun. ' i E. -1688 
Peterson, Oscar 
1'pterson, Tom 
Plnkiert, C B. 
Plom, Charles 
Poknandt. H. 
Pommer. Jon 

A ug 
funis. Anton' 
Purgold. G. E. 



Quigley, Robert E. Quinn, William 



a, F. 
liaaum. Henrik 
Randolph, J. S. 
Rank. W. 
Rasmusen, P. 
Rasmussen, Kmil 
Rasmussen, J. A. 
Rasmussen. J. -446 

i r. Mihel 
Retail, Otto 
Rlckes, G. S. 
Rlmmer C M. 
Uinta. Kail 

Sanders, Robert 

Sanders. S. 
Sanderson, Alfred 
Sandstrom, Ivar 

Sanne. Rudolf 
Sass, John 
Saunders. James 

;er, Ernst 
Scheuchte, Olaf 
J Schmehl, Jas. P. 
Schmidt, l.onis 
Sehmitt. F. 
Sehnelder. H. 
Scott. A. 
Sehcrg. C. 
Selin. William 
Sellers. Wm. G. 
Slkman, A. 
Siller. E. 
Silver, S. A. 



Ritcher, J. 
Roberts, Frederick 
Roberts. Grift 
Rodin. Fred 
Rolland. Lars O. 
Rosenquist, A. 
Rotter, K. 
Rndf. Walter 
Rundqulst. O. 
Rutel, Ernest 
Ryan. James 
Ryan, Patrick 

Slvers, Frank 
Simonsen. S. -2046 
Sinnott. Nickolas 
Skegoldenborg. F. 
Smith, John 
Smith L. K. 
Smith. Lyman M. 
Sneider, G. 
Soderberg. R. 
Solberg, Bernt 
Sorensen, Anton 
Sorensen, Jens 
Sorensen, L. A. 
Sorensen, P. -2722 
Sorensen, Vigo 
Spanas, Niek 
Spanon. James 
Stansberg, Ivar 
Stelnfart. J H. F. 
Stenberg, Gus 



Anderson. A 
Berling. J. B. 
Billington, Martin 
Ceelan. -lohti 
i . Baere, i [enry 
Ellefsen. otto 
Furth. Richard 
Hansen, Karl 
Hansen, Marlus 
Hansen, O. 
Hendrlksen. Hag- 
bart 

■ii, A. L. 
Johansen. Emll 
Nor. Nils 
Olsen, Arne 



Olsen, Carl -lini 
Pennlngrud. Lu.lwik 
l'ersson. Osear 
Petersen, Aage 
Raasch, O. 
Raaurn, Henry 
Rarly. Fi 
Rathke, Reinhold 
Relursen. A. L. 
Roberts, John 
Sorensen. Pete 
Smith. Max 
Strasdin, A. W. 
Wakely, R. B 
Walters. Albert B. 
Wurthman. W. L. 



I 



Phones: Office, Franklin 7756 

Res.. Park 6950 
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cal. 



TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO ST., near Market 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

'Nuf Sed 



FRENCH AMERICAN 
BANK OF SAVINGS 

Savings and Commercial 



108 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Resources . . $7,700,000 

Member of Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco 

United States Depository for 

Postal Savings Funds 



DIRECTORS 



G. Beleney 
J. A. Bergerot 
S. Rissinger 
Leon Boequeraz 
O. Bozio 
Charles Carpy 



J. M. Dupaa 
John Glnty 
J. S. Godea-.i 
Arthur Lepallet 
Geo. W. McNear 
X. De Pichon 



DLlJLXXJDDLPLlJLTELTTTTTraiiaD 
INFORMATION WANTED. 

W. A. Goodrich, who left the Brit- 
ish ship "Puritan" at San Francisco 
February 6, 1911, is inquired for by 
the British Consul-General at San 
Francisco. 

G. Laurence Ames, formerly em- 
d on British steamer "Iguapa," 
discharged at Manila, P. I., last 
heard of at San Francisco on July 
15, 1914, is inquired for by the U. S. 
Shipping Commissioner at San 
Francisco. 

Charles Anderson, alias Helmik 
Helgesen, a native of Alvestad, Sta- 
vanfrcr, Norway, a^e 70, is inquired 
for: last time heard from in 1904. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify his brother, B. 11. Al- 
vestad, Jewal, Towa. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 

(Member of the Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco.) 

The following Branches for Receipt and 

Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mis- 
sion and 21st streets. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. W. 
Corner Clement street and 7th avenue. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. 
Corner Haight and Belvedere streets. 

JUNE 30, 1915: 

Assets $60,321,343.04 

Deposits 57,362,899.35 

Capital actually paid up in 

cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve & Contingent Funds 1,958,443.69 
Employees' Pension Fund.... 199,164.12 
Number of Depositors 66,965 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week, with all modern 
conveniences. Free Hot and Cold Shower 
Bath on every floor. Elevator Service. 
AXEL, LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front Street and Broadway, 
Opposite Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. Office 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



Phone Garfield 833 E. Benvenutl, Mgr. 

HOTEL FAIRFIELD 

250 Large Sunny Rooms Furnished Up- 
to-date. With all Latest Conveniences 
and Elevator Service. Rates: 25, 30 and 
50 cts per Day. $1.25 per Week and Up. 
Free Baths — Large Reading Room 
1325 STOCKTON STREET 
Near Broadway San Francisco, Cal. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods. 

50 East Street, 

San Francisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets end 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN $ NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Cigars and Tobacco 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



JORTALLBROS.EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 

206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Fred Marjama, a native of Russia, 
age 36, has not been heard from since 
1908, at Buffalo, N. Y. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify his brother, J. Marjama, 51 
South St., New York, N. Y. 9-1-15 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

CLASSY CLOTHIER 

HATTER AND FURNISHER 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

UNIFORMS 



Gold Braid and Gold Wreaths 
of All Descriptions 



News from Abroad. 



Phone Douglas 1082 

139 EAST STREET - - - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Between Merchant and Washington 



£2* IV /T^^V MJ^ T""M ""fr Cy See that this label (in light 
^51 k%/ fl \^9 fSb^ 1L. Ir^r ^^ blue) appears on the box in 
- ■*■ w ■"■ ^"^ m ^ ^^^ which you are served. 



Issued' by AuDiomy ofuie Cigar Miners International Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

(Jtlitf (Sertifirt IM*e^«*M»iUtotata«ite»B*t»»nflHte1M«)l 

jMrJBCBOf IH[OGWlUHIO'll(IU>IUII0>»LUIIr0»(< hmna. « omnu*o» devoted n O* ad- 
MKt.ent ol tta KOWXATBlWjnd MBlftNH WU'AJOf TM£ CRAIX ftmfcux — < 
tfel. Cmjjr t£ all smken tiumtait Uw world 
BBJIE— I B ilium Ihn lihll»l f t-| p-rltT- 1 1-,-1— 



»»■ SIMIU 



Q. TV (£Ufout4, htmkm 
V ctrrucfA 



J. MILLER 

124 EAST STREET Garfield 7690 

Union Store 

HATS, CAPS, 

FURNISHING GOODS, 

ETC. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN. 
San Francisco. 

Blom, J. Petterson, Carl 

Ekeland, Will Hj. Thorsen, Ole 
Hakansson, Ingvar Thorstensen, H. 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUrACTURERS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 



BANK OF ITALY 

San Francisco Los Angeles 

San Jose San Mateo 

The Story of Our Growth 

As Shown by a Comparative 
Statement of Our Resources. 

December 31, 1904 $285,436.97 

December 31, 1905 $1,021,290 80 

December 31, 1906 $1,899,947.28 

December 31. 1907 $2,221,347.35 

December 31, 1908 $2,574,004.90 

December 31, 1909 $3,817,217.79 

December 31, 1910 $6,539,861.49 
December 31, 1911 $8,379,347.02 

December 31, 1912 $11,228,814.56 
December 31, 1913 $15,882,911.61 

Dec. 31,1914, $18,030,401.59 
June 30, 1915, 49,080,264.20 

NUMBER OF DEPOSITORS, 53,946 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Samuel Dickson, a seaman, age 
about 40 years, son of Moffett Dick- 
son, deceased, of Belfast, Ireland, or 
any person knowing his whereabouts, 
is requested to communicate at once 
with the undersigned in connection 
with a legacy. A. R. Smith, U. S. 
Shipping Commissioner, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of John Burke, No. 2, a -member of 
the Marine F. O. and Watertenders' 
Association of the Great Lakes, last 
heard of in Chicago, will please com- 
municate with Mrs. Julia Noonan, 
276 Twelfth street, Jersey City, N. J. 

William Walker, a native .of Island- 
magee, Antrim Co., Ireland, is in- 
quired for by his nephew. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts kindly com- 
municate with John Walker, Geddis, 
7 Willowbank St., Brooklands, Win- 
nipeg, Manitoba, Canada. 

Edvin Nikolai Nielsen, a native of 
Kristiania, Norway, is requested to 
communicate with his sister Minni, 
who has important news from home. 
Address, Mrs. Minni Hall, Green 
Farm, Conn. 9-16-14 

Herman Sigfrid Persson, a native 
of Malmo, Sweden, supposed to be 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, who has 
not been heard of for two years, is 
inquired for by his brother, Gustav 
Persson. Address 13 Stenbarksgatan 
Malmo, Sweden. 7-28-15 

Vcncelus Durbich is inquired for 
by his brother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please communicate with 
Gerolamo Durbich, Zurich, Switzer- 
land. 7-28-15 

John Dickson, who left Greenock, 
Scotland, about 10 years ago, his last 
address was Melrose House, Lower 
Boxhill, Brooklyn, New Zealand, is 
inquired for by his mother. Any- 
body knowing if he is alive or dead 
please notify the Secrets; y of the 
National Sailors' and Firemen's Un- 
ion, Greenock, Scotland. 



An uprising of royalists in north- 
ern Portugal has caused Parliament 
to pass a resolution stating that the 
government will use rigorous means 
to preserve order. Captain Henrique 
de Paiva Couceiro is said to be lead- 
ing the royalists. 

A year of war has cost Canada 
$90,000,000. It is costing Canada 
$300,000 a day. The total war expen- 
diture up to July 31, or practically 12 
months after war was declared on 
August 4 last year, was $81,500,000. 
The ratio of expense is going up all 
tlit time as the Dominion places more 
and more troops in the field. Almost 
the whole expenditure is military in 
character. The pay of the troops 
alone costs little less than $100,000 
per day. 

Following the example of Ger- 
many, the Austro-Hungarian Gov- 
ernment now announces, according 
to the Frankfurter Zeitung, that all 
Austrians and Hungarians in neutral 
countries, particularly in the United 
States, are warned not to work in 
factories producing war material for 
enemies of the dual monarchy. 
This newspaper says that violation 
of this decree is punishable by im- 
prisonment of ten to twenty years, 
and even by capital punishment un- 
der certain conditions. 

The United States Government has 
made formal demand upon the Hai- 
tian Government that the latter ac- 
cept immediately the draft of a ten- 
year convention, providing for the 
American control of the customs and 
revenues of the country, the cession 
of no part of Haiti to any other 
country than ours, and the estab- 
lishment of a native police, rural and 
district, to be commanded by Amer- 
icans. It is demanded further that 
the revenues collected shall be dis- 
bursed primarily to pay American 
employes, secondarily to settle Hai- 
tian bonds, and the remainder to de- 
fray budget expenditures. Much op- 
position to the convention is evi- 
denced. 

General Villa has accepted the pro- 
posal of the Pan-American govern- 
ments for a conference of Mexican 
leaders for the purpose of agreeing 
upon terms of peace and establishing 
a permanent government. General 
Carranza continues to maintain that 
there is no need of a conference, and 
that he is the legitimate and legal 
head of the revolution. He contin- 
ues to transfer government depart- 
ments to Mexico City, where he 
claims conditions improve daily. The 
Red Cross officials, however, report 
starvation as the lot of many people. 
One-fourth of the people arc asking 
relief. Generals Zapata, Palafox, 
Chazaro, Pacheco, Lazo and others 
have accepted the Pan-American 
peace proposals. 

Conflicting rumors continue from 
the Balkan countries. A treaty be- 
tween Bulgaria and Turkey is report- 
ed, but a warning from the Allies 
that it is considered an unfriendly 
act delays Bulgaria's signature. Ser- 
bia announces that her new forces 
will enable her to repel 1,200,000 Aus- 
trians, or 800,000 Germans. The Al- 
lies have reached an agreement with 
Greece whereby she may carry on a 
normal commerce, in return for which 
she agrees that no commerce with 
Germany, Austria, or Turkey thai 
may be injurious to the Allies is to 
cross her borders. Italy claims prog- 
ress in her campaign, but reports 
nothing definite. The Italian army 
sent against Turkey has not been 
heard from at the front. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the Wits. 



Willing to Try.— Bix— Can I trust 
you? 

I )ix— Actions speak louder than 
words. Try me with $10.— Boston 
Transcript. 



Hardly His Fault.— Officer (severe- 
ly)— Is this rifle supposed to have 
been cleaned? 

Recent Recruit— Well, sir— yes. But 
you know what these servant gals 
are! — Punch. 



Usually Not.— "Pa, a man's wife 

is his better half, isn't she?" 
"We are told so, my son." 
"Then if a man marries twice 

there isn't anything left of him. is 

there?"— Boston Transcript. 

Missing Tribute.— Manager— What's 
the leading lady in such a tantrum 
about? 

Press Agent — She only got nine 
bouquets over the footlights to-night. 

"Great Scott! Isn't that enough?" 

"No. She paid for ten."— Tit-Bits. 

Showing His Ignorance.— "What 
on earth are you doing?" demanded 
the indignant dining-car conductor 
of the novice waiter; "serving soup 
on a straight track? Why don't you 
wait till wc strike a curve? You 
don't know the first principles of 
railroading." — Puck. 



His Turn Coming.— "Why do you 

,11 rowing with that man? He 

thinks it's funny to rock the boat." 

"I've heard so," replied the ath- 
letic girl. "I took a dislike to him 
the first time I saw him, and I'm 
just dying for an excuse to hit him 
over the head with an oar."— Wash- 
ington Star. 



Within Her Rights— A woman 
mounted the steps of the elevated 

station carrying an umbrella like a 
reversed saber. An attendant touched 
touched her lightly, saying: 

"Excuse me. madam, but you are 
likely to put out the eye of the man 
behind you." 

"Well, he's my husband!" she 
snapped. — Chicago Herald. 



An Invitation 

We invite deposits from every one- 
rich, poor, old and young. We recog- 
nize no classes, but treat large and 
small depositors with the same cour- 
tesy and consideration. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 



733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



BAGLEY'S 

Old Colony 

THE HIGHEST TYPE OF 

TOBACCO PACKED IN 

10c TINS, ALSO 16 OZ. 

GLASS JARS 

§r*^Sd6jTfi/toa»Bj of tha t~- ng ,,„._,„ 
S^vlKTDHUmONAL I UNION 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 
House, San Francisco, Cal. 
THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
Is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equip- 
ped with all modern appliances to Illustrate 
and teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation in the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always In view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There Is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how igi:orant the seaman may be, even In the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise Mm from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and In a 
comparatively short Interval of time. 









Upholding American 
PROSPERITY 




<3I8TCB* 



UNION LABEL OF THE 

UNITED HATTERS OF N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 



him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 
JOHN W. SCULLEY, President MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary-Treasurer 

Rooms 72-73 Bible House, New York City 



STRICTLY UNION STORE 

J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET, OPPOSITE FERRY POST OFFICE 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER— UNION LABEL 
NOTICE! BOSS OF ROAD 
OVERALLS— PRICE, 70 CENTS 

Phone Douglas 1737 

Demand the Union Label 



VS^^^A^^»^VV^»^^»^/SA^^VVS^V\^^W\^A/^A/VAA^VVVS/V^A^VVVVsA/V^^ 



nrrnrTTTnrrnnrTTnnnnnnnnrTirTTnnrTnnr-inf- o i i i i rrTinrTT T-innrr 

a 



JUL 



Christensen's Navigation School 





The key to Prosperity Is Saving 
So make up your mind to prosper 
by buying one of Hale's $1.00 Banks 
for only 50c. It Is the best possible 
way to teach the children thrift and 
the vital principles of saving. We 
keep the key, and you can only open 
the Bank by bringing It to Hale's 
Do what you wish with the money. 
Banks on Sale at Transfer Desk. 




JBOgp cooo* . 

Market at Fifth 



LUNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 
in 4 Stores: 
1126-21 MARKET STREET 
2640 MISSION STREET 
605 KEARNY STREET 
26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 



VVVv^VV^A^rVVVVVVVS/^ArV^AArVVVV»^/VV^^ 

It SAMUEL 

The Old Union Store 

CLOTHING a GENTS 
FURNISHING GOODS 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, 

Boots, Shoes, Rubber Boots and 

Oil Clothing of All Kinds, 

Watches, Jewelry, Etc. 



Established 19M 

116 DRUMM STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

(SCANDINAVIAN SAILORS HOME) 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- C 
quirements for passing a successful 
examination before the U. S. In- C 
spector. As only a limited number = 
of pupils will be accepted at one [= 
time, delay and loss of time will £ 
be avoided while preparing for ex- 
amination. 
aDDD^mmDDDagDgmm.D[XDgDDDpD[X]aDDDDDDDDaDaDananaDD 




MADE 



REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 




$ames J?. Soronsen. 



THE POPULAR PRICE JEWELRY STORE 

715 MarKet Street, San Francisco 

NEAR CALL BUILDING 

Jewelers, Watchmakers, Opticians 
SOUVENIRS 



693 THIRD STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

Opp. S. P. Depot at Third & Townsend 



Justice to All. Please Give Us a Trial 
and You Will Be Convinced. 



WN^S/W^/WVWV^WVN/N/S/WW^V-WWWN^W"* 



"YOUR HATTER" 
FRED AMMANN 



72 Market Street 
San Francisco 



Union Hats 



OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



s 





I y ~ > ' 







FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXIX, No. 2. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1915. 



Whole No. 2348. 



THE DAWN OF AN OTHER DAY. 

Andrew Furuseth's Labor Day Contribution. 



Yes, it is true the Sixty-third Congress passed 
acts of legislation which will be remembered 
when nearly all others enacted by it have been 
forgotten or have been superseded. When, in 
the Clayton Act, it laid down as a definite prin- 
ciple of policy on the part of the United States, 
that "the labor of a human being is not a com- 
modity or an article of commerce," it distin- 
guished between persons and things in such a 
way as no Congress or other law-making body 
had done at any earlier period. The labor power 
of a human being is the most personal of all 
things on earth; it grows with the human 
growth; it decays in sickness and old age and 
ceases at death; it can not be divided from the 
possessor thereof; it can not be separated from 
the person; and if the judiciary had recognized 
this distinction between persons and things, be- 
tween the labor power and the products thereof, 
there would have been little necessity for any 
amendment to the Sherman anti-trust law. 

The Underlying Principle. 

This same principle runs through the so- 
called "Seamen's Act"; it makes the seaman for 
the first time in seven centuries the owner of 
his own body; it makes it possible within the 
jurisdiction of the United States for these sea- 
men, not only on vessels of the United States, 
but of all foreign vessels, to assert their rights 
as human beings, as persons created in the 
image of God, endowed with certain inalien- 
able rights, amongst which are the rights of 
liberty, equality and the pursuit of happiness. 

The history of the sea-faring calling — or pro- 
fession, whatever it may be called — is some- 
what remarkable. In the southern countries — 
that is, in the countries of the Mediterranean 
basin — we have historical information dating 
back to the empire of Babylon; and the first 
statutes that we know anything about are the 
statutes of Hammurabi, one of the Babylonian 
kings; the seaman was a chattel owned by the 
vessel or by the owner of the vessel; through 
the history of Phoenecia and Carthage, we find 
the seaman as a chattel; through the history of 
Rome we find him a freedman, a member of the 
collegia which contained the sea-faring part of 
the population. It is most remarkable that in 
the struggle for supremacy in the Mediterranean, 
the comparatively free seamen of Rome ulti- 
mately asserted their mastery over the Medi- 
terranean, as against the seamen of Asia Minor 
and the seamen of Carthage. 

The Sea Power of the North. 

In the northern European countries we find 
an entirely different condition. Amongst the 
Vandals on the Coast of the Baltic and amongst 
the Norsemen of Scandanavia. the seaman was 
an absolute freeman. The relation of the sea- 
man to the master of the vessel, was the same 
as the relation of the inhabitants of a citv to 
the Burgomaster thereof. The sea-power of ! In- 
north which showed itself superior and over- 
came the sea-power of Rome, was built up in 
absolute freedom. 

The two svstems, the slavery of the Medi- 
terranean and the freedom of the north, met in 
the twelfth and thirteenth centuries in the Bal- 
tic and in the North Sea and in the Bay of 



Biscay. The Mediterranean idea, coming over- 
land with Christianity, met and mingled with 
the idea of the seaman's freedom as it was 
found in the Baltic and it resulted in the stat- 
utes of Wisby. The Norse idea was carried 
along the coast of Europe; it touched England, 
Normandie, Aquatania and the present Spain. 
The Norse seamen carried with them their idea 
of freedom and in meeting with the Mediter- 
ranean idea, there developed the statutes of 
Oleron and the Consulate of the Sea, which 
latter is the old Spanish sea law. This meeting 
and mixture took place in the twelfth and thir- 
teenth centuries and resulted in laying the basis 
for the sea law that has been in existence ever 
since. The martime law, as developed in the 
Middle Ages, fundamentally recognized the sea- 
man as a freeman. This will be found written 
deep and strong in the law of Wisby and the 
scroll of Oleron and in the Consulate of the 
Sea; but aside from this, the other maritime 
regulations and statutes worked towards an 
automatic development of a body of seamen 
who were thoroughly inured to the sea, who 
knew their business thoroughly and whom the 
owner of the ship could depend upon and had 
to depend upon to defend his property not only 
against the forces of nature but against the 
piracy of the times. 

When the seaman was in a home port, he was 
the freest of men, he was the owner of him- 
self — something that was denied to all other 
workers; he was capable of making a contract — ■ 
something that other workers could not do; 
having made a contract, he was bound to the 
vessel through common hazard in foreign ports 
and foreign climes and in all the waters, and the 
vessel was bound to him; there was reciprocity 
and in the home port of the vessel the seaman 
was free. 

Shipowner Was Responsible. 

The shipowner, under the then existing law, 
was responsible to the traveler and to the ship- 
per. The world had not yet invented the limi- 
tation of liability nor the present system of in- 
surance and the loss of the vessel meant to the 
owner thereof, a very great financial loss — a 
loss that might make for bankruptcy; and 
therefore, automatically, the shipowner was in- 
terested in having the strongest, most coura- 
geous and most skilful men that he could obtain 
in his employ. As a result, the seaman's wages, 
a part of which was his right to trade on his 
own accord, were such that he could take as 
good care of a family, nay, even better care, 
than could the blacksmith, the joiner or any of 
the other mechanics or any other men engaged 
in what is commonly called "skilled trade." 
Thus, we find in the closing of the eighteenth 
and the beginning of the nineteenth centuries, 
thai the wages of the seamen who sailed from 
the east coast of England were five guinea pi i 
month; we find later that the wages of the seaman 
was sufficient upon which to marry and raisi 
family; we find that young men, conscious ..I 
, their health and strength and with some little 
I romance or adventure in their mental dispo i 
tions, sought the sea; the sea has developed thai 
wonderful class of men who have defended the 
liberties of the Netherlands, who made Portugal 



a great nation, and who gave to Great Britain 
the mastery of the world. 

The Abolition of Serfdom. 

The French Revolution came and it changed 
the relation of servant and master, or workman 
and employer fundamentally; serfdom was abol- 
ished on shore; men who had previously been 
tied to the estate, were given the privilege of 
free locomotion; men who worked for one em- 
ployer could quit him at will and seek some 
other employer; the result was an entirely new 
relation. Previously the employer had no con- 
cern about his workmen; if they were dissatis- 
fied, it was not any of his business; if they left 
him, he could appeal to the peace officers to 
have them brought back to work for him or be 
sent to prison. The new status changed all this 
and the employer had to consider what his 
workman was thinking, the workman might 
leave him in the moment that was of greatest 
importance to the employer; it might result in 
serious financial loss, and therefore, an entirely 
new relationship arose between them. As the 
workmen on shore learned how to combine and 
meet the employer with a united strength of 
their own, the wages of the workmen on shore 
gradually rose; they doubled, trebled, quadrupled 
— nay, in some instances quintupled — and the 
skilled workman on shore, who had worked for 
one dollar a day, received five; while the sea- 
man whose status — term contracts to labor en- 
forceable by imprisonment — had continued and 
was compelled to continue at the same wages 
and conditions, or quit his occupation entirely. 
Step by step, the more self-reliant and capable 
men of the sea sought employment on shore; 
their wages and conditions made it impossible 
for them, under increased cost of living, to sus- 
tain a family, and naturally, they left an occu- 
pation which made it impossible for them to 
live a healthy, human life. The sea gradually 
became the domain of those who had fought 
life's battles and accepted defeat, of the sewage 
of the Caucasian race and of such of the races 
of Asia as felt that their condition could be im- 
proved by becoming seamen. 

No Risk for Shipowner. 

About 60 per cent, of seamen are at sea at 
all times; another 20 per cent, are in harbors 
under contracts which they can not break; the 
remaining 20 per cent, are idle, seeking employ- 
ment. Of course, it is impossible for 20 per 
cent, of any calling to raise it to higher levels; 
but to make it still more difficult, the ship- 
owner has rid himself of the laws under which 
he was compelled to employ men of his own 
nationality; he had, through his political influ- 

, succeeded in imposing upon the diffen 
nations such limitations of shipowners' liability 
as would either make him, like in the United 
Slates, absolutely free from any responsibility to 
the traveler or, as in England or any of the 
other countries, only partially so. This, with the 
development of insurance, left the shipowner 
automatically free of any risk and responsibility; 
the risk he had transferred to thi public through 
Hie insurance; the responsibility to the traveling 
public itself; and liis whole financial interest was 
bound up in getting the cheapest mi n thai tin- 
world could furnish to him. As a result. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



a gradually growing loss of human life at sea; 
growing (luring every half decade since 1860, 
to the present time, until in the last half decade 
more than 1000 a year have been lost in pas- 
senger ships alone. 

The laws of each particular nation, compelled 
the seaman, having once signed a contract, to 
continue to labor even against his will during 
the life of that contract. Through treaties en- 
tered into with other nations, these laws were 
made mutually operative in every nation, and 
thus, it made no difference to what country the 
seaman came, he was compelled to continue on 
board tin- vessel in which he happened to be. 

The result of this kind of treaties and of the 
laws passed thereon, was inevitable. The high 
nations, such as the United States, were, 
step by Step, driven from the ocean, and the 
laws of competition quickly handed the ocean 
over to the low wage nations, The men of the 
United States quit the sea; the men of England 
have been quitting the sea within the last twen- 
ty years; the men of northern Europe are quit- 
ting; the men of southern Europe arc hesi- 
tating and the men of Asia are taking the places 
of those who are quitting. The present war 
-hows in what a helpless position is a nation 
that must depend upon other nations or races 
for the seamen that they need. 

Seaman a World's Citizen. 

Going from one nation to another, from one 
nation's vessels to another, from one great 
port to another throughout the seven seas, I 
learned by bitter experience every phase of the 
seaman's life. I saw men sign and saw them 
compelled to sign away the wages of the first 
three months in the trade From the Pacific Coast 
or Australia or India to Europe; I saw men 
trying to get free from their vessels; 1 saw 
them pleading sickness when they were not sick; 
1 saw them taking poison in order to become 
sick; I saw them commit petty crimes, from put- 
ting their feet through plate glass windows to 
;ing policemen in order to get free from 
SSel; and step by step. 1 realized that hack 
of the seamen's condition, hack of the helpless 
life that he was leading, was some great funda- 
mental cause that had to he removed in order 
that the white race might retain its 
and that men actually tit for the sea might con- 
tinue in the calling or he drawn towards it. 

We appealed to the Supreme Court of the 
United States under the thirteenth amendment, 
which prohibits involuntary servitude within the 
jurisdiction of the United States and we were 
answered that when a citizen becomes a seaman 
he voluntarily surrenders all his rights of citi- 
zenship; and therefore, the thirteenth amend- 
ment to the Constitution of the United States 
has no application to the men of the sea. When 
this decision was handed down, we adopted as a 
motto, "To-morrow is Also a Day." The Su- 
preme Court had said that Congress had abso- 
lute ami unrestrained jurisdiction over the sea- 
nd that it was bound by no constitutional 
limitations. It was plain, therefore, that there 
was no hope except in Congress; hence, to Con- 
gress we turned with our petitions and with our 
arguments, hoping that as skill gradually de- 
parted from the sea, as loss of life gradually in- 
creased as a result thereof, as the nation should 
become more and more in need of seamen and 
finding that they could not be obtained, the time 
would come when Congress out of concern for 
the traveling public and out of national consid 
eration would determine that seamen were a 
Slty, would change the maritime laws in 
such a way as to induce the Americans to again 
seek the sea and to retain for the Caucasian 
power so vitally needed for the 
national and racial independence. 

In making these appeals to Congress, we were 
influenced by the fact that as the condition of 
the American seaman is improved, as his wages 
are elevated, so as to induce the American to 
become again a seaman, we are legislating our- 
selves off the seas. It becomes more impossible 
to compete with the low wage countries of 
Europe and the still lower wage countries and 
of Asia. 

The Difference in Wages. 

The reasons for the difference in wages; 
wages in seaports are largely determined by 
the wage-rate of country tributary thereto; 
hence, the cost of operation was not far to 
seek. If a man could be shipped on the coast 
of India at $8 a month, in Hongkong at $8 a 
month, in Japan at $12 a month, in Fiume at 
$16 a month, and if this man could be brought 
to the United States and take away a cargo of 
American products and a full passenger list at 
a rate of wages in competition with the Ameri- 
can vessel, hiring her men in American harbors 
and paying $30 or $40 per month, of course, 
competition was out of the question; the law 
of supply and demand had been hamstrung by 
the treaties. Remove the treaties and thi 
based thereon, permit the men who receh 
per month or $ld i :h to release them- 

selves in harbors of the United States; give to 
them enough of their earned wages to make 
them able to protect that freedom and i 
it and all the vessels leaving the ports of the 
United States would be compelled to pay the 
same wages; then foreign shippers would have 
the same cost of operation and the United 
States could compete and could afford to give 
humane conditions to seamen under its flag. 

Congress after Congress met and adjourned; 
the seamen pleaded with the Committee of Mer- 
chant Marine and Fisheries of the House and 



the Commit ommerce of the Senate, and 

their plea fell upon deaf ears until it could be 
shown and was shown that by releasing the law 
of supply and demand the low wage countries 
would have no advantage over the high wage 
countries in the operation of vessels on the 
ocean and then gradually members of both 
parties— the biggest men in each — came I 
that here was a way out, here was an oppor- 
tunity and a means to rebuild the merchant ma- 
i the United States without subsidies and 
subventions. 

Men like Mr. Alexander, Mr. Hardy and 
others, whose principal duty it was as members 
of the Committee on Merchant Marine and Fish- 
eries, to study these conditions, came to the 
conclusion that the way to restore the .Ameri- 
can merchant marine to the ocean was not 
_ h subsidies, but through freedom. Men 
like Dr. Foster, Mr. Underwood, Speaker Champ 
Clark. Mr. Mann am! others, save careful study 
to these questions, under the leadership of Mr. 
William 1!. Wilson, now Secretary of Labor, and 
the Sixty-second Congress passed the Seamen's 
bill. The specific purpose of it was: first, to 
liberate the seaman; second, to promote safety 
; and third, to build up an American mer- 
cantile marine without the use of subsidies. 

The Act of the House went to the Senate; 
it was referred to the Committee on Commerce, 
of which Knute Nelson of Minnesota was chair- 
man. He appointed a subcommittee to study 
and report upon the bill, and as chairman of 
that subcommittee he selected Senator Burton 
of i »hio. We who advocated and struggled for 
the bill felt pleased at the appointment of Sena- 
tor Burton, because as a member of the House 
he had been opposed to subsidies and loeically 
the only alternative of subsidies was freedom 
and equalization of the cost of operation aris- 
ing therefrom. We were woefully and terribly 
pointed in Senator Burton; we had not 
figured on the influence or the power of the 
shipowners in the United Stales, nor had we 
taken into account the power of the shipowners 
of foreign countries; we had not given sufficient 
thought to the three hundred millions of dollars 
of American money invested in foreign vessels; 
we thought that this was not only a seamen's 
measure, but a measure of great national im- 
portance — one to restore the American mer- 
chant marine. 

Those "Foreign" Protests. 
first, the foreign shipowners found their 
voices, they held meetings throughout Great 
Britain and protested in the most emphatic lan- 
guage against this legislation then being enacted 
by the Congress of tin- United States. The gov- 
ernments of Great Britain, Germany, Spain, 
Holland, Belgium, France and other countries 
were called upon to protest through the regu- 
lar diplomatic channels. They did so. The 
that the shipping interests, foreign and 
lie, has over American newspapers showed 
itself in the most emphatic manner, by the 

al turning of the publications that had 
been friendly, into publications that were utter- 
ly unfriendly to this legislation; Senator Burton 
helped to organize the opposition; he gave to 
the opposition all the opportunity that it wanted, 
by keeping out of the record some of the most 
important things that the seamen wanted to 
have put in, and finally brought back from the 
subcommittee a bill which nobody would stand 
for, that could only be tolerated after having 
been materially irts of 

Senator Nelson of Minnesota and when finally 
passed tin Senate and then the Mouse, was just- 
ly .oid properly pocketed by President Taft — 
not that 1 would say that President Taft under- 
just the reason why he should pocket it, 
but he did it on the request of some shipowner 
or some other people. However, if he had fully 
known what the bill contained, it would have 
been his duty either to pocket it or veto it; be- 
cause in some instances, it unjustifiably and im- 
properly undertook to interfere with the dis- 
cipline of foreign vessels while they were on the 
ocean. 

\s William B, Wilson, the present Secretary 
of Labor, had been the main champion of the 
bill in the House during the Sixty-second Con- 
gress, so Senator LaFoIlette of Wisconsin, be- 
came the champion of this legislation in the 
Sixty-third Congress. Through his efforts in 
the Senate and the efforts of Rufus Hardy, who 
was appointed chairman of the subcommittee in 
the House the bill was somewhat recast during 
the Sixty-third Congress. The agreement ar- 
rived at by the "London Conference on the 
Safety of Life at Sea," was inserted through the 
Special efforts of Mr. Alexander of Missouri and 
it law was finally enacted by both 

es and sent to the President after the most 
painstaking and searching investigation that has 
been given to any legislation within the last 
thirty years. 

New Law Not Perfect. 
The law does not by any means go far enough 
in protecting the traveling public; it will be 
found that in some instances, it contains errors 
that will militate against its efficacy in bringing 
the American to sea; but the improvements are 
so great as to constitute the dawn of a new 
day. It .means the freedom of the sea; it re- 
- to the American seaman his rights of 
citizenship, it gives him half the wages that he 
amed. with which to protect that free- 
it regulates the hours of labor in port and 
l, in such a way as to make the crew of 
the vessel available for the safety of the travel- 



public; it provides for a knowledge of 
language of the officers thai will make it pos- 
sible to have direct command and swift obedi- 
ence thereof in hours of stress and danger; it 
provides for a standard of efficiency in the able 
seaman so as to enable those who are so- 
called, to ders when they understand 
them; and finally, it provides for some skill in 
what the law calls "certificated life-boat men." 
It abolishes tin- payment of wages before it is 
d, and it makes these several laws ap- 
plicable to foreign vessels coming within the 
jurisdiction of the I'nitcd States. 

The specific purpose of Congress was to put 
lei coming within the jurisdiction of the 
United States upon an absolute equality, and if, 
in any way, it failed to reach its purpose, it is 
because of the action of the Commissioner of 
Navigation. Mr. Eugene Tyler Chamberlain. Mr. 
Alexander of Missouri and Mr. Hardy of Texas, 
the chairman of the committee and chairman of 
the subcommittee, respectively, had a right to 
trust in the knowledge and honesty of purpose 
of that official of the Umited States government; 
if he failed to warn them of any particular 
statute which could be so construed as to 
exempt certain nations from the operation of 
Section 14 of this act; this official, Mr. Chamber- 
lain, did not only betray the Senators and Con- 
gressmen that trusted him, but he betrayed the 
administration in whose service he was permitted 
to remain. 

1 am inclined, however, to question whether 
there is any exemption; it was carefully kept 
in view throughout the entire act, including Sec- 
tion 14, that this act shall apply to all foreign 
vessels coming to ports of the United States; 
and in Section 16, which provides for the abro- 
gation of treaties these words vverc inserted 
"and any other treaty provisions in conflict with 
the provisions of this act." and one would think- 
that this was sufficient; if it, however, should 
prove not to be so — if the Attorney General 
shall find it to be his duty to hold otherwise 
and so report to the President, then it is a 
simple matter for this coming Congress to 
repeal that particular section of the inspection 
laws which exempts from careful inspection 
! nations whose inspection laws 
are substantially similar to our own. 

Twenty-one Years of Labor. 

This act is passed. It took twenty-one years 
to pass it. In passing it, we seamen had to 
meet the best talent that the shipowners them- 
selves could furnish and the best talent that they 
could buy; they came to Congress in opposition; 
when they misquoted the United States statutes, 
it became our duty to expose them; when they 
misquoted the statutes of foreign nations, it be- 
came our duty to expose thein. I'.ut the study 
and investigation needed for this purpose, no 
man will understand or know, who has not lived 
through the struggle. They arc now filling the 
newspapers of the country with the same in- 
formation that they tried to impose upon the 
members of the House and tin Senate and upon 
the President prior to the passage of this legis- 
lation. If we look carefully at what the news- 
papers say, we shall find that they do not quote 
any particular shipowner as specifying any par- 
ticular thing; that will militate against the real 
American shipowner and the building up of the 
real American mercantile marine. They are 
ling by icral statements to fill 

the public mind with apprehension; but there 
be no fear. The Seamen's Act will keep 
American ships under tin- American flag, be- 
cause it equalizes the wage cost of operation 
and leaves the American shipowner the bene- 
ficiary of many very great privileges that he has 
had heretofore and which he is denied under 
any other flag. Let 08 hope that this legisla- 
tion will not be interfered with and it will 
prove the most important and successful piece 
of legislation enacted dealing with the merchant 
marine during the last one hundred years. The 
principles laid down in this legislation will be 
adopted by the foreign nations one after an- 
other; both because of the inherent justice of it 
and because of iis expediency; and it will lie 
found that those wdio are now opposing it most, 
when it shall have been in operation for a 
while will be the last to wish it repealed; it will 
be found that as it travels onward from nation 
to nation, giving hope to the oppressed and 
safety to the traveling public, that those whose 
nanus are connected with it. will be remem- 
bered and revered in the different seapoi 
the world, when all other legislation of the 
Sixty-third Congress, outside of the Clayton Act 
shall have been forgotten and superseded. The 
names of Wilson and Lincoln will go together; 
WoodrOW Wilson completed Lincoln's work. 

Without the earnest assistance of Mr. Gom 
pels and of the labor movement generally: with- 
out tin- earnest assistance of lovers of free- 
dom and humanitarians and progressives in 

Congress and OUtside of Congress, this ll 
lion would have been impossible. It now ap- 
that the struggle to defend this legislation 
will have to be made as earnestly as the struggle 

to obtain it, and we seamen, while being deeplv 
grateful for the assistance that we have received, 
that in defending it. we shall have the 
same assistance that we had in obtaining it. — 
Andrew Furuseth, in the September American 
Federationist. 



The Ciospcl of Unionism— higher wa 
shorter hours, and Letter working conditions 
for all who toil. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Manly Report Should be Distributed. 

"Get busy with your Congressman" is 
the advice of the Racine Call in urging 
the widest publicity of the Manly report 
to the Commission on Industrial Rela- 
tions. 

The paper says : 

"The same interests that tried to pre- 
vent publication of the Manly report to 
the Commission on Industrial Relations 
may be depended upon to try to block its 
distribution. It, therefore, behooves voters 
to be prompt and early in asking their 
Congressmen for copies. Nor should they 
let themselves be put off with the reply 
that the supply has been exhausted. Let 
Congress spend less for documents that 
nobody reads or cares for, and more to 
print a sufficient supply of a report like 
this, which will be for years to come a 
valuable reference work. 

"Not only should wide circulation be 
given the Manly report, but its recom- 
mendations should not be allowed to 
quietly slumber. The plutocratic press is 
already at work trying to arouse prejudice 
against it while studiously refraining from 
any fair discussion of its contents. The 
aim and hope of the predatory interests 
is that Congress will contemptuously dis- 
regard it. So it is up to labor organiza- 
tions, farmers' organizations, organizations 
of useful business men and public-spirited 
citizens' organizations generally to get busy 
at once and insist on immediate enactment 
of legislation by Congress in line with its 
suggestions. Now is the tinie to act. Frank 
I'. Walsh, chairman of the Commission on 
Industrial Relations, has done his work 
well. So also have Commissioners Gar- 
retson, O'Connell and Lennon, who stood 
by him. The next step is for citizens to 
see that what these faithful officials have 
begun is pushed to its conclusion. Let 
there be no delay." 



Guard Workers' Lives Is Preparedness. 

"While militarism and preparedness are 
as opposite as the poles, let it be under- 
stood that labor is alert to the kind of 
preparedness the steel trust, coal barons, 
railroad combines and allied interests fa- 
vor," declared A. F. of L. Secretary Frank 
.Morrison, in a recent address at Bloom- 
ington, 111. 

"Labor sees the wolf of militarism con- 
cealed behind the 'Little Red Riding Hood' 
pretense of those men responsible for Lud- 
low, who favor cossacks in the various 
States and who have blackened the history 
of Illinois." 

The A. F. of L. official was the principal 
speaker at the Labor Day celebration. 
He discussed militarism and preparedness 
at length, and said, in part : 

"In discussing militarism and prepared- 
ness, let it be understood that the labor 
movement is not in favor of peace at any 
price. Our strikes indicate there is a point 
in the lives of trade unionists where they 
gird their loins for battle rather than 
longer accept unbearable conditions. 

"Strikes indicate life, vigor, and strength. 
Power to make, effective protest against 
wrong should be encouraged. A nation's 
workers who do not possess this power can 



be of little service to their country in its 
hour of need. 

"Labor favors preparedness, but not the 
kind that consists of militarism under an- 
other name — huge armies, gigantic navies 
and other accouterments of war that sub- 
ordinates civil authority, that drains a na- 
tion's wealth, takes its bone and sinew 
from productive fields and glorifies idle- 
ness, glitter and lace rather than social 
service and worth. 

"Labor favors preparedness, and as the 
first step in that direction we demand that 
the killing of America's best manhood in 
the shops, mills and mines of our country 
be stopped. We stand aghast at the corpse- 
strewn battlefields of Europe, but let us 
not forget that 30,000 of our fellow-coun- 
trymen engaged in gainful occupations are 
killed every year. Men talk about pre- 
paredness, but never a word of protest at 
the annual loss of these thirty regiments 
that are silently swept into unknown graves 
that dividends may continue. More than 
this, every year there are 700,000 wealth 
producers injured, and this only includes 
those whose injuries extend over a period 
of four weeks. 

"And no record is made of the thousands 
whose systems are weakened through low 
wages and long hours in illy ventilated 
coal and ore mines, foul workshops and 
factories, and who become public charges 
as a result of numerous occupational dis- 
eases contracted in the production of use- 
ful things. How can men ignore condi- 
tions that spell ruin for any nation and 
imagine labor will believe their claims that 
dangers threaten us from without? 

"Labor believes in preparedness. We 
demand that the annual killing of these 30,- 
000 industrial workers cease, and we fur- 
ther demand that the three-quarters of a 
million wage-earners annually injured be 
given that protection their usefulness to 
society warrants." 



Altgeld's Memory Honored in Chicago. 

Organized labor of Chicago joined with 
Federal and State officials, Labor Day, in 
paying honor to the memory of John Peter 
Altgeld, former Governor of Illinois, by 
unveiling a statue of this champion of com- 
mon rights. 

"Altgeld was a friend of the common 
people and never feared to take a stand 
with them," Governor Dunne said, "Pre- 
eminently he had the courage of his con- 
victions. He upheld the right and de- 
nounced the wrong at all times, under all 
circumstances, and in every place. 

"He believed the conviction of the an- 
archists was the result of the mob's de- 
mand, although the mob was clothed in 
purple and fine linen. When he was elected 
Governor he had the courage to do what 
was a most unpopular thing at that time — 
to pardon the anarchists (hen confined at 
Joliet. In so doing he gave His reasons, 
and the doing startled the whole com- 
munity. 

"His moral courage was again displayed 
when President Cleveland, without request 
from Governor, Legislature, or Mayor, sent 
Federal troops into Chicago for the pur 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



International Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmcrston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, Lon- 
don. E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers. 4 Spekeland Bldgs., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pietcrs- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 

Federation National ,des Syndicats des In- 
scripts Maritimes de France, 33 rue Grange aux- 
Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 
NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade 15, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 
ITALY. 
Federazionc Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S, Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 
Verband der 1 landels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinncn Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 
SPAIN. 
Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Repostems, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 
Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calle [ngla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 
Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandores, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix IS, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sodedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sa<> 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo dos Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos IS, Rio de Janeiiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 
Amalgamated Society of South African Sen- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point R 
Durban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World's WorKers. 



South Australia's labor government 
has fallen into line with the pref- 
erence to unionists principle. 

Industrial awards increased the 
wages paid to railway servants in 
New South Wales by £1,300,000 in 
si\ years. 

Sweden's maritime law has been 
amended to the effect that no seaman 
shall be compelled to go to sea in 
case of danger caused by mines and 
torpedoes. 

Owing to the large wheat harvest 
expected in Victoria this season the 
government anticipates a shortage of 
labor in consequence of the number 
of men who have gone to the front. 
Twenty-two of the largest Sydney 
(X. S. W.) business firms have 
agreed to pay their employes who 
enlist the difference between the 
wages they had and their military 
rates of pay. 

Mr. Charles Burke, Secretary of 
the Queensland branch of the Fed- 
erated Seamen's Union of Australia, 
has been appointed a member of the 
Marine Board as a direct repre- 
sentative of seamen. 

A demand that the Porto Rico 
government put its peasants on the 
land is made by A. F. of L. Or- 
ganizer Iglesias, in the official 
newspaper of the Federation of La- 
bor. The trade unionists says ab- 
sentee property owners and foreign 
corporations have grown rich 
through agriculture and the guaran- 
ties offered by modern conditions. 
Industrial depression and specula- 
tion are at their height, and rents, 
interest rates and living costs have 
risen proportionately, says Iglesias. 
The Carpenters' Union of Hamil- 
ton, Ontario, has won its long con- 
troversy with the Confederation Con- 
struction Company, and work on the 
new Welland ship canal by this con- 
cern will now proceed without fric- 
tion. The new contract provides 
for a 40-cent minimum, time and 
one-half for overtime and double 
time for Sundays and holidays. The 
work day shall be nine hours and 
only members of the Carpenters' 
Union are to be employed. All fu- 
ture differences will be adjusted by 
arbitration. The company's contract 
amounts to over $10,000,000, and it 
is claimed it will not be completed 
before 1919. The carpenters' vic- 
tory is the result of persistent agi- 
tation and appeals to the Dominion 
Department of Labor that the com- 
pany live up to its contract and 
the fair wage clause included therein 
At a recent meeting of the Mil 
bourne Trades Hall Council it was 
moved, "that this council recognizes 
the need of complete national unity 
in the present war crisis; yet know- 
ing that the workers have most to 
gain by peace conditions, requests 
the Labor party in the Australian 
Parliament to urge the Imperial Gov- 
ernment, in the name of suffering 
humanity, to openly declare to the 
world the terms upon which the Im- 
perial Government think the Allies 
should negotiate for peace." An 
amendment was then offered, as fol- 
lows: "That this council is of the 
opinion that the Federal Labor Gov- 
ernment will strongly support any 
movement for an honorable peace 
at the proper time, which will com- 
mand the support of this council, 
and upon this issue the council has 
every confidence in the present na- 
tional government of Australia." The 
amendment was rejected by one 
vote, and the motion was then 
agreed to by 52 votes to 50. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. B. CANNON 



CANNON a BLAIZE 



A. E. BLAIZE 



Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 
515 FRONT-516 BEACON 8TS. .... SAN PEDRO 

"WHEN IT COMES TO GOOD CLOTHES" 

Tailored to FIT YOU, in a UNION SHOP 
it will be to your interest to call on 

S. G. SWANSON 

641 SOUTH BEACON STREET, next door to Postotflce 
Established 1904, at the Los Angeles "Waterfront" SAN PEDRO, CALIFORNIA 

San Pedro News Co. M. BROWN and SONS 

have moved to 

109 SIXTH STREET 

Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



Sixth and Beacon Street*, San Pedro, Cal. 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

STATIONERY 

r.os Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



Mills, Elbert ® Nash 

SIXTH AND BEACON STREETS 

FIFTH AND BEACON STREETS 

— Dealers In — 

EDGEWORTH TOBACCO AND 

UNION LABEL CIGARS 



GIVE US A TRIAL 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

The members of the crew of the 
barkentine "Mary Winkelman" who 
made the voyage in her to Mollendo, 
Peru, and arrived at San Francisco 
on her return trip on April 5, 1914, 
are wanted by the Charles Nelson 
Co., at San Francisco, Cal. — 6-24-14 

John Erik Nordberg, a native of 
Sweden, age about 26, supposed to 
be sailing on the Pacific Coast, is 
inquired for by his brother Harold, 
care of Sailors' Union of the Pa- 
cific, San Francisco. 

Oscar Olsen, age 37, a native of 
Hallerna, near Gothenborg, Sweden, 
who was sailing on the Great Lakes 
about three years ago, is inquired 
for by John V. Olsen, Sun Com- 
pany, Marcus Hook, Pa. 5-26-15 

Adolph Godfred Eriksen, born in 
Moss, Norway, is inquired for by 
his brother, Herman Eriksen. Any 
one knowing his whereabouts please 
notify W. Nielsen, 206 Moravian St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 5-26-15 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

F.dgar Duncan Stewart, age 22 
years, white, born in Massachusetts, 
who, on October 9, 1912, was 
shipped as seaman on the American 
steamship "Toledo," at Marcus Hook, 
Pa., for a voyage to Sabine, Texas, 
but who did not join the vessel the 
next day, and has not since been 
heard from. The undersigned will 
highly appreciate your kind co-oper- 
ation: Augustine R. Smith, United 
States Shipping Commissioner, or 
Shipping Commissioner, Appraisers 
Building, San Francisco. 5-13-14 

Nils Edmund Johansen, a native of 
Tonsberg, Norway, age about 50, 
last heard of at Melbourne, Austra- 
lia, is inquired for by his brother. 
Address, Martin Johansen, 839 Cen- 
tennial avenue, Alameda, Cal. 

Eugene Martin, age 25, 6 feet tall, 
gray eyes, is inquired for by his 
mother. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify Mrs. Rose T. 
Martin, 4231 15 N. E., Seattle, 
Wash. 1-27-1915 

Chas. Maywell, a sailor, last heard 
of in New York City in 1892, is en- 
quired for by his son; anyone know- 
ing his whereabouts please notify 
William J. Maywell, 426 West 59th 
street, New York City, N. Y.— 12-23-14 



A SAILOR'S BANK. 

With Branches Throughout the World 

In the Philippines, Japan, China, Straits Settlements, India, 
London, Mexico and Panama, the 

INTERNATIONAL BANKING CORPORATION 

is particularly well equipped to give service to 

SEA-F ARING MEN 

IN THE 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 
of its San Francisco Branch 

it gives "Personal Service" and courleous treatment to all its 

customers. Four per cent, per annum is paid on Savings 

Deposits, computed semi-annually. 

In 1910 it purchased and took over the business of the 

SWEDISH AMERICAN BANK 

and for the accommodation of its Scandinavian customers, 
the bank carries on hand at all times an ample supply of 
Swedish, Norwegian and Danish 5Kr. and lOKr. bank notes. 

Sailors' Accounts are Especially Welcomed 

Head Office— 60 Wall Street, New York 

Resources over $40,000,000 

MILLS BUILDING :: BUSH and MONTGOMERY STREETS 

Uptown Branch, Geary and Fillmore Streets 

Open Saturday Evenings, 6 to > 

E. W. WILSON, Manager 



San Pedro Letter List. 



Anderson, Emanuel 
Anderson, Edw. 

-1739 
Anderson, John 

ii. -Martin 
-1894 
Anderson, Sven. 
Letter.) 

!i nest 
Andersson, Enkan 

list, < itlo 

p, Arthur 
ii. Borge 
Buantk, Ij. 
Brein, Hans 
Kensen. Kay 
Bergman. Leo 
Benrowitz, Felix 
Carera, Pete 

■ : .11. 1 'i'l>' 

Doyle, William 

Duval, William 

Ericsson, Otto 

Eklund, Sven 
Win. 
ii. Oskar 
'i. Charly 

Hansen, M. 

Hansen. Hilmar 

I [ecki : . \< illiam 

Hannus, Alex. 

Jensen. H. -1666 

Johansson, Victor 

.Tohanson. T. 

is, August 

Johansson, Geo. W 
-1219 

Johanson, Oeo. 

Johnson. E.lvat.l A. 

Johansen. Chas. 

Johansson, John V. 

Johnson, fins. 

hi. K. II. 
Kalnin, Bid. 



Lindeberg, Ernst 
Latz, [Constant 

Lun. isle, it. Chris. 
Lutzen, Vald 

Joe 
Lindsberg, C. 
Larsen, L. K. 
Lindholm. A. 

in, Johan 
Mikalsen, Andr. 

-taf 
• I. 

Mesak, B. 
Martinson. P. A. 
.n. Julius 
Ni.hr, Niels 
( Usen, John 
i ilsen, Ludvig 
Olsen, 

i 'w.n. Fred 
< iphaug, Wilhelm 
i Min. Emil 

Ingrud. l.n.lvik 
Peterson. 1 1 

Peterson. N 
Peterson, < »tto 

P. 
Philips, Charley 
dson, A. 
ons, Olal 
A. 

Ren vail, Anshelm 

Smith. Law 

Sutse, Michael 
San. has. CI 
Stromsberg, Ivar 
Sevenson. Psul z 

Si.v.-rs. H. P. 
I ' 

Toren, Gustaf A. 
Uhllg, Rii hard 
Verney, M. I >. 
Verdonk, Peter 
Warkkala, John 
Packages. 
Johnson, K. M. 



Honolulu, H. T. 



Anderson, John E. 
Burk, Harry -1284 
Crantly, C. W. 
Eugenlo, John 
Ekelund, Rlckhard 
Ivertsen, Sigvald B. 
I-engwenus, W. L. 
Moller, F. 



Nelsen, C. F. 
Petersen. Carl 
Peters, Walter 
Reither, Fritz 
Solberg, B. P. 
Strand, Conrad 
Thompson, Emll N. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Daniel William Thorin is inquired 
for by his mother. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify Fru 
Thorin, Hegagata 7, Gothenborg, 
Sweden. 9-23-14 

Carl Fritjof Johansson Lind, age 
39, a native of Sonderborg, Germany, 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, is in- 
quired for by his brother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify John Lind, 1401 West 9th St., 
Cleveland, Ohio.— 3-24-15. 

Frederick Wood, a seaman, sailing 
on the Pacific Coast, is inquired for 
by his sister, Miss Lucy Wood, lOfe 
Broughan street, Darlinghurst, Syd- 
ney, N. S. W., Australia. He is de- 
scribed to be tall, with dark curly 
hair and carries a scar on the nose. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
kindly notify the office of Chief of 
Police, San Francisco, Cal. — 6-24-14. 

Waldemar Stintman, alias Broth, 
a native of Russia, age 21, supposed 
to be sailing on the Pacific Coast. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify his brother, John Stint- 
man, address Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific, San Francisco. 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Magnus Magnussen, a native of 
Soderhamn, Sweden, should at once 
communicate with F. A. Smith, Box 
770, Aberdeen, Wash. 9-23-14 

Martin Nielsen, a native of Den- 
mark, member of the Sailors' Union 
on the Pacific for the last 8 years, 
has not been heard of since July, 
1912. His address then was Sailors' 
Union, Seattle, Wash. Any one 
mo; his whereabouts please no- 
tify George I.conhard, Sailors' Union, 
59 Clay St.— 8-11-1915. 

Olai Ingcbrigtsen (Brock), a na- 
tive of Norway, last heard from 13 
years ago, when leaving San Fran- 
cisco for Australia on the American 
bark "Golden Gate," is inquired for 
by his brother. Any information re- 
garding the above named will be 
gladly received by Xiels Ingcbrigtsen, 
469 — 49th street, Brooklyn, N. Y.; or 
Sam Andersen, 100 Steuart street, San 
Francisco, Cal. — 8-4-15. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



The Pacific Alaska Navigation Co. announces 
that the contract for raising the wrecked 
steamer "Admiral Watson" has been placed with 
the Seattle Construction and Drydock Co. 

The Benicia Shipyards Co., Benicia, Cal., has 
received an order for building a $50,000 ferry- 
boat for the Richmond and San Rafael Ferry 
and Transportation Co. 

The Norwegian steamer "Admiralen" has been 
fixed for a cargo of shingles at the A. P. 
Allison mill, Green Point Rapids, B. C, New 
York by way of the Panama Canal. The 
" Idmiralen" has been laid up on Puget Sound 
for nearly fifteen months. 

The bark "Levi G. Burgess" has established 
a new sailing record from Bristol Bay to the 
mouth of the Columbia River of 10 days and 9 
hours, the best previous record being by the 
"C. F. Sargent," 13 days, in 1913. The "Bur- 
gess" was built in 1877. 

Advices from Vancouver state that according 
to private reports received there the Canadian 
Pacific liner "Empress of Japan" is to be re- 
leased by the British Admiralty and will re- 
sume service as a merchantman. She will go 
to Hongkong for overhauling before loading for 
Vancouver. 

It was announced that the bark "Albert" 
has been lixed to carry lumber from Columbia 
River to New Zealand. It is also stated on 
good authority that quite a number of these 
vessels arriving from the fishing grounds will 
go into the lumber trade between this Coast 
and Australia before next fishing season. 

The first shipment of Japanese coal to the 
Hawaiian Islands arrived at Honolulu on Sep- 
tember 13 on the Japanese steamer "Yubari 
Maru." This was the first of a supply of 130,- 
000 tons contracted for by the International 
Steam Navigation Company of Honolulu through 
the Hokkaido Tanko Kishen Kaisha. 

The contract for the construction of another 
large freight steamer for the New York and 
Cuba Mail Steamship Company, generally known 
as the Ward Line, has been awarded to the 
Seattle Construction and Dry Dock Company. 
The new vessel will have a carrying capacity 
of 5,000 tons dead weight. 

The brig "Lurlinc," which was bound from 
Eureka to Salina Cruz and abandoned by her 
crew last January 1564 miles south of San 
Pedro in a waterlogged condition, was sighted 
by the Japanese steamer "Komi Maru" on Sep- 
tember 3. The steamer reported the derelict to 
be awash and a danger to navigation upon 
the latter's arrival in Honolulu the other day. 

Various public bodies and leading business 
concerns of Puget Sound are preparing a peti- 
tion memorial setting forth the advantages of 
that port and urging the Alaska Packers' As- 
sociation to transfer its ships and plant from 
San Francisco to Seattle. For a long time 
the association has been outfitting some of its 
Alaskan cannery ships each year at Puget Sound 
ports. 

During August, there went forward to Europe 
from San Francisco by direct water transporta- 
tion 27,588 tons of barley, 1844 tons of assorted 
dried fruits, 1569 tons of beans, 164,069 cases of 
assorted canned goods. 1469 cases of honev, 
568,172 gallons of oil, 906 tons of raisins, 320 
tons of coffee. More than $500,000 of anti- 
mony was shipped from here to New York for 
transshipment to Europe. 

Making a record as the first vessel of her 
tonnage that ever came to San Francisco from 
Chicago under her own power, the auxiliary 
schooner yacht "Fiorgvn," owned by Thomas 
Thorkildsen of Los Angeles. Cantain Lewis 
Hansen, master, arrived at San Francisco on 
September 15. The "Fiorgyn" was 145 days 
from Chicago, coming bv way of the Hudson 
and New York, and forty-three days from Bal- 
boa. 

McGregor's Landing, for years an important 
shipping noint on the island of Maui, has been 
ordered closed by (lie board of harbor commis- 
sioners. Officers of the Tnlcrisland Steam Navi- 
gation Company say the refusal to permit ves- 
sels of that company to call at McGregor's 
will work a hardship to many shippers and 
travelers. The commission states that it is 
ready to make the port of Lahaina reasonably 
safe for the landing of passengers and freight. 
Island sugar mills are grinding cane later 
than usual this year owing to an increased crop 
on many plantations. The extension of work 
at the mills has caused demand for more ton- 
nage to take care of the increased output. The 
American-Hawaiian Line has announced that it 
will withdraw several of its steamers from the 
Hawaiian Island trade. The Matson Navigation 
Co. will take care of a large share of the sugar 
remaining to be forwarded to the west coast of 
the United States. Sugar for the east coast 
is practically all carried in American-Hawaiian 
bottoms. 

Liability of the owners of the steamer "] 
raiso," which rammed and sunk the steamer 
"Admiral Watson," lias been limited to $180000 
by United States District Judge Jeremiah Net- 
erer. Tbe "Paraiso" had been libeled by the 
Pacific Alaska Navigation Company, owner of 
the "Watson" for $247,000. The "Paraiso" was 



released on bond and sailed for Southeastern 
Alaska with general freight and _ mining ma- 
chinery. Upon her return she will be turned 
over to her owner, the Long Beach Steamship 
Company, which will operate her between Port- 
land and San Francisco pending the settlement 
of the libel action. 

Federal Judge Hough, in a decision rendered 
at New York, has sustained the contention made 
by the Government in the admiralty suit for 
$800,000, brought by the Pacific Mail Steamship 
Company as owner of the steamer "Newport," 
against the Pan-American Railroad Company. 
On August 17, 1912, two hundred and thirty 
feet of the bulkhead of a pier at Balboa, Canal 
Zone, collapsed, throwing 18,000 tons of earth 
and two large electric cranes into the water. 
The steamer "Newport," which was alongside 
the dock, was sunk. The Pacific Mail Com- 
pany brought suit, claiming the bulkhead had 
been improperly constructed. 

Application has been made to the Bureau of 
Navigation of the Department of Commerce for 
the measurement of North German Lloyd and 
Hamburg-American line ships now held in 
Hawaiian ports by the European war. The 
measurement was requested to qualify the ships 
for using the Panama Canal. The request was 
forwarded by the Collector of Customs at Honctr 
lulu with a letter from the agents of the steam- 
ship lines setting forth that the Surveyor of the 
Port of Boston had already measured the Ham- 
burg-American liners "Amerika" and "Cincin- 
nati." There are three Hamburg-American and 
four North German Lloyd ships now at Hono- 
lulu. The measurements will probably be made 
at the convenience of the Surveyor. 

Three million and seventy-eight thousand dol- 
lars in gold, the second largest shipment ever 
received at San Francisco from Australia and 
New Zealand, was brought to port during the 
week by the Union liner "Moana" from Sydney 
and Wellington. The only other shipment 
larger was that of $5,000,000, brought here on 
the Oceanic liner "Ventura" three weeks ago. 
There were 410,000 pounds sterling in the ship- 
ment from Sydney, and the Wellington con- 
signment amounted to 51,399 ounces. One hun- 
dred and thirty-three boxes were necessary to 
pack the shipment. The gold was consigned 
to local banks and is sent here in payment 
for the large amount of grain, hay and muni- 
tions which have been sent to the Antipodes in 
shiploads from this port. Another shipment of 
$5,000,000 of Australian gold is due on the 
Oceanic liner "Sonoma." 

More than fifty vessels, large and small, have 
been held up in the Panama Canal since Sep- 
tember 4th owing to a landslide. According 
to information received by the marine depart- 
ment of the San ^rancisco Chamber of Com- 
merce, vessels drawing not more than twenty- 
five feet of water again passed through the 
waterway on September 11 and the larger ves- 
sels got awav the next day. The Panama-Pa- 
cific liners "Finland," bound from San Francisco 
to New York, and the "Kroonland," bound 
from New York to this port, have been inter- 
rupted in the Canal since September 4th. On 
board the liners are nearly fifteen hundred peo- 
ple who have to be fed at the expense of the 
company. It is estimated that the loss to the 
steamship line is close to $3000 a day. The 
"Kroonland" left New York for this port August 
28th. It is likely that the liner will not arrive 
here until the latter part of the month. 

The steamer "City of Panama," formerly of 
the Pacific Mail fleet, plying between San Fran- 
cisco and the western coast of Mexico and 
Central America for more than forty years, is 
about to come to an ignominous end. The 
Rolph Coal Company is about to destroy the 
old vessel where she lies in the mud flats be- 
tween Potrcro and Hunter's Point. The an- 
nouncement comes as a strong counter against 
the Government, for it was only a few days ago 
that the captain of the Government tug "Hart- 
ley" reported that the old "City of Panama" 
was a menace to navigation, in that proper 
lights were not displayed on her at night. A 
fine of $200 was assessed against the present 
owners of the vessel. The steamer "City of 
Panama" was taken off the San Francisco and 
lower coast run about three years ago and laid 
up in Oakland creek. About a year ago the 
Rolph Coal Company purchased the steamer, 
had her machinery removed and converted her 
into a barge. During a southeast gale last Feb- 
ruary she sank in shallow water with 1500 tons 
of coal aboard. The coal was recently removed 
and instead of paying a fine of $200 the Rolph 
Coal Company has asked that the fine be re- 
mitted and that the Government perform a duty 
required in the case of obstructions to naviga- 
tion by blowing the old hulk to pieces. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navv, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 3 9 4 
Merchants' Exchange Bldg., Third Floor. Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone Kearny 
394. (Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS- 
FEDERATION. 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary, 

570 West Lake St., Chicago, III. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass, U/ 2 A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway St 
NEW YORK CITY, 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St 
NORFOLK, Va., 41 Loyalls Lane. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 South Commerce St 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 12 South St. Telephone 2107 

Broad. Night Call 2108 Spring. 
New York Branch, 400 West St. Telephone 5153 
Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 258 Commercial St. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 117 Decatur St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 806 South Broadway. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 
Headquarters (temporary): 
BOSTON, Mass, iy 2 A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
NEW YORK, 51 South St. and 280 West St 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway. 
NORFOLK, Va., 41 Loyalls Lane. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 

HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 190 West St. Phone 4126 Worth. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
ERIE. Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 15 Twelfth St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO, III., 445 La Salle Ave. 
DETROIT, Mich., 27 Jefferson Ave. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
HEADQUARTERS: 
406 N. Clark St., Chicago, III. 
Telephone Main 365. 
BRANCHES: 
Buffalo, N. Y. Toledo, O. 

Cleveland, O. North Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Milwaukee, Wis. Superior, Wis. 

Ashtabula, O. Erie, Pa. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 59 Clay St. 

Branches: 
VANCOUVER, B. C, 213 Hasting St., E. corner of 
Hasting and Main, P. O. Box 1365, Tel. Seymour 8703. 
TACOMA, Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 
SEATTLE, Wash., 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65. 
ABERDEEN, Wash.. P. O. Box 6. 
PORTLAND, Ore., 44 Union Ave., North. 
EUREKA, Cal., 227 First St., P. O. Box 64. 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67. 
HONOLULU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 
P. O. Box 314. 

(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



PAUL SCHARRESNBERG Editor 

I. M. IIOF.T Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

ear, by mail - $2.00 | Six months - - - $1.00 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second- 
class matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
59 Clay Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 22, 1915. 



"AS SOOX AS PRACTICABLE." 



In a report to President Wilson on the 
"Eastland" disaster, Secretary of Commerce 
Redfield says "that as soon as practicable in 
the fall a searching inquiry will be made into 
the whole administration of the Steamboat 
Inspection Service under the supervision of 
representatives of the Navy Department and 
of the public, so that there will be no question 
of its impartial character." 

The Secretary states also that instructions 
have been given to the Steamboat Inspection 
Service to take the necessary steps to carry 
into effect the additional rules and regula- 
tions suggested by the board of inquiry. In- 
structions have also been given to the Steam- 
boat Inspection Service to call together a 
special committee consisting of supervising 
inspectors selected from the Atlantic, Pacific 
and Gulf coasts "who shall, with the super- 
vising inspectors upon the Great Lakes, 
promptly consider what can be done, within 
the [.resent lawful scope of the Steamboat 
Inspection Service, to improve its effective- 

The above and a few indictments, which 
do not mean anything except that some poor 
fellow will be made the goat for the real 
criminals higher up, seem to constitute the 
"net" results of the numerous inquiries into 
the "Eastland" disaster. 

In the meantime the same incompetent and 
inefficient Inspection Service will go right on 
in the even tenor of its ways with ( ieo. C. 
I liler at the helm. 

Evidently, it will require much more than 
a "Slocum" or an "Eastland" horror to make 
any serious changes in the United States 
Steamboat Inspection Service. This is the 
most deplorable aspect of the whole sickening 
affair, Eor, as the Boiler Makers' Journal 
points out, "an incompetent inspection system 
is more dangerous and fraught with more 
serious results than if no inspection laws were 
enacted, because it lulls the public into a 
false sense of security." 

Let us hope that Secretary Redfield will 
soon find it "practicable" to make that search- 
ing inquiry. 



A "DOLLAR DECORATION. 



"Captain" Dollar, the noted coolie lover. 
has again broken into print. 

The Hearst papers, in pursuance of their 
established policy to discredit the Wilson 
administration, will print anything and 
everything, no matter how absurd, as long 
as it reflects unfavorably upon the pres- 
ent administration at Washington. So 
"Captain" Dollar embraced the oppor- 
tunity to shed a few crocodile tears over 
the transfer of the British steamer "Per- 
sia" from the Pacific Mail Steamship 
Company to a Japanese concern. Just 
how this sale of a British steamer affects 
the American Merchant Marine is not ex- 
plained by the doughty "Captain." although 
he made a cunning attempt to so shape 
bis phraseology as to lead the unwary to 
the conclusion that the "Persia," having 
been American owned, must have been 
under the American flag. 

In closing bis latest whine about the 
disappearance of cooiie-manned American 
ships "Captain" Dollar attempts to be 
funny. He submits to the Mikado the 
names ,,f Senator La Follette and Andrew 
Furttseth as being worthy of high honors 
for having driven the British steamer 
"Persia" from American to Japanese own- 
ership. 

Let us most respectfully suggest to 
"Captain" Dollar that it ill becomes an old 
gentleman residing in a glass house to in- 
dulge in cheap sarcasm. "Captain" Dollar 
has so persistently practiced and encouraged 
the employment of coolie labor that the 
very names of his ships have become 
tainted and malodorous bywords. 

Tf any one man is entitled to high hon- 
ors and decoration at the hands of Orien- 
tal potentates it is the distinguished Cap- 
tain Dollar. No single American, except 
perhaps Mr. R. P. Schwcrin, has been 
more faithful to servile coolie labor than 
Robert Dollar. In fact, it may be as- 
sumed, if the Dollar method of manning 
had been adopted and given full sway 
there would to day remain scarcely an Amer- 
ican or Caucasian seaman of any caliber. 

We therefore nominate the Captain for 
the very highest decorations of honor is- 
sued by the Republic of China and the 
Emperor of Japan. 



MELBOURNE, Sept. 18.— The entire mem- 
bership of the House of Representatives of the 
Federal Parliament, the legislative body of the 
commonwealth of Australia, has pledged itself 
"never again to purchase German goods." -As- 
sociated Press Dispatch. 

Such expressions of "brotherly love" as 
the foregoing are startling, to say the least. 
Now, if the Germans and other partici- 
pants in the world war will only adopt 
similar pledges and if we carry the whole 
absurd thing to its logical conclusion this 
world of ours will soon be divided in little 
mole-hills — each surrounded by a Chinese 
wall. 



It does seem strange that the noble patriots 
who have "hollered" the most about the loss 
of American lives in the "Lusitania." the 
"Arabic." the "Hesperian," etc., have shown 
the hast concern about the slaughter of the 
innocents in the "Eastland" tragedy. Why 
so much sympathy for the few who were 
drowned while traveling in a foreign vessel 
and so little for the many victims of Amer- 
ican excursion steamers? 



IT IS TO LAUGH ! 



While the poor scribes of Willie Hearst's 
editorial staff are compelled to write long 
articles bemoaning the "decline" of the 
foreign-going American Merchant Marine 
because President Wilson signed the Sea- 
men's bill, the darned old Merchant Ma- 
rine refuses absolutely to become a corpse, 
and instead keeps on growing stronger and 
healthier week by week. 

During the week ended August 28. 1915, 
there were admitted to American registry 
under the act of August 18, l r '14. two 
freight vessels of a total tonnage of 4.515 
gross, as follows : 

Gross tons. 

Steam screw "I. aura" (formerly Dutch 
"Laura") 3,154 

Schooner-barge "Prins Valdemar" (former- 
ly Mexican "Prins Valdemar") 1,361 

The "Laura" is now owned by the Amer- 
ican Transatlantic Co. (Inc.), New York. 

X. V.. and the "Prins Valdemar" by G. W. 

McNear (Inc.), San Francisco. Cal. 

Including the above named the total of 

foreign vessels admitted to United States 

registry now stands as follows: 

Vessels. Gross. 
Total. July 1, 1915, to Aug. 28, 

1915 13 40,917 

Total, fiscal year ended June 30, 

30, 1915 148 523,361 

Grand total 161 564,278 

Yes, sir, that Seamen's bill is a funny 
critter. According to the Hearst-Dc 
Young form chart that untutored animal 
should kick the American Merchant Ma- 
rine clean out of the ring. Instead, the 
silly thing is doing the very opposite. 
And to-day, all calamity bowlers to the 
contrary notwithstanding, the Stars and 
Stripes arc flying on more ships in the 
foreign going trade than at anv time since 
1863. 



The New York Nautical Gazette is a ship- 
owners' periodical which has evidently seen 
the error of its ways in opposing the new 
Seamen's Act. In common with other pub- 
licity organs maintained by the shipping in- 
terests, the Nautical Gazette has in the past 
bitterly attacked and grossly misrepresented 
the Seamen's Charter of Freedom. Rut the 
"Eastland" affair with all its sickening inci- 
dents got under the Gazette editor's skin and 
he is now quite sure that the opposition to 
the Seamen's Act has never "been directed 
against the safety requirements it imposes 
upon shipowners." Well, we don't blame our 
contemporary for crawling away from the 
topheavy and tottering structure it has helped 
to erect in order to cast odium upon the Sea- 
men's Act. It takes a hardened conscience 
and a brazen nerve, such as is possessed by 
only few mortals, to demand the repeal of 
safety regulations in the face of that mon- 
strous crime against humanity so recently 
witnessed at Chicago. 



John Kean, president of the Pacific Coast 
District of the International Longshoremen's 
Association, reported at a recent meeting of 
the San Francisco Labor Council that after 
ten months of negotiation an agreement had 
finally been entered into, affecting about 8,000 
men along the Pacific Coast and carrying an 
increase of wages and general improvement 
in working conditions at several ports. De- 
tails of the bargain are not available. 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Journal's ad columns. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



OAKLAND CARMEN MAY STRIKE. 



Several weeks ago the San Francisco- 
( )akland Terminal Railways discharged two 
men who were among the first deckhands on 
the Key Route ferry-boats to join the local 
union of the Amalgamated Association of 
Street and Electric Railway Employes of 
America. 

The company claimed the men were dis- 
charged for good and sufficient reason, but 
after a thorough investigation by the Union's 
Grievance Committee this was deemed to be 
only a flimsy excuse, and the reinstatement 
of the men was demanded. And here is 
where trouble started. The company offi- 
cials absolutely refused to meet any commit- 
tees or officers of the Union, thereby violating 
Section 1 of the existing working agreement, 
which reads as follows: 

Section 1. It is agreed that the properly ac- 
credited officers of the Union will be recognized 
in discussing any grievances of employes. Griev- 
ances shall first be presented to the Superintend- 
ent, and if a satisfactory adjustment cannot be 
made, appeal shall be had to the General Man- 
ager. SI Id there still be no satisfactory ad- 

justment, the grievance shall be presented to the 
Board of Directors. 

All of the above provisions were complied 
with by the officials of the Union, but the 
company in every case refused to meet the 
men, thereby leaving no avenue of action open 
except to lay the entire matter before a special 
called meeting of the Union. This was done 
during the past week and the Union decided 
by an almost unanimous vote to strike, if that 
be necessary to secure redress for the two 
victimized deckhands. 

Under the laws of the Amalgamated Asso- 
ciation no strike can take place until all efforts 
to settle the matter by arbitration have failed. 
Formal steps have already been taken to try 
adjustment by arbitration and the belief is 
freely expressly that the company will recede 
from its position rather than risk a general 
tie-up of the road. 



DEFEAT RALPH McLERAN. 



The following self-explanatory resolution 
should prove of particular interest to resi- 
dents and voters of San Francisco: 

Whereas, At the last session of the California 
State Legislature there was introduced a bill 
known as the "Dust Proof Cement Container 
bill - '; and 

Whereas, This bill provided for the protection 
<>f the health of sailors and stevedores handling 
cement in sacks; and 

Whereas, One Ralph McLeran, then and now 
a _ member of the Board of Supervisors of the 
City and County of San Francisco, actively op- 
posed the passage of the bill and telegraphed 
members of the Legislature, requesting and be- 
seeching them to vote against this meritorious 
measure; therefore be it 

Resolved, By the Water Front Workers' Fed- 
eration, that we denounce such action of said 
Ralph McLeran as a most vicious and cowardly 
attack upon the membership of this Federation; 
further 

Resolved, That the secretary of this Federation 
he directed to request all Unions affiliated with 
the San Francisco Labor Council and the Build- 
ing Trades Council to urge their members to 
vote against said Ralph McLeran in his candi- 
dacy for Sheriff and help defeat this enemy of 
organized labor who has in the past posed as a 
"friend of labor," and has used his former trade- 
union affiliation as a means of boosting himself 
into public office. 

The foregoing tells its own tale. 

McLeran deserves defeat at the hands of 
the workers. 

No man of his calihcr should be entrusted 
with the responsible position of Sheriff. The 
Cement Trust may need him ; but the work- 
ers who form a large percentage of San 
Francisco's electorate, can well dispense with 
his services. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases! 



ATTORNEY-GENERAL'S OPINION. 



The Journal has finally been able to se- 
cure a copy of the opinion rendered re- 
cently by F. W. Gregory, Attorney-General 
of the United States, with reference to Sec- 
tion 14 of the new Seamen's Act. 

Section 14 was printed in full in the 
issue of the Journal dated April 21, and 
it will be recalled, deals exclusively with 
life-saving appliances, manning of boats and 
rafts, muster rolls, drills, etc. 

In effect, the Attorney-General's opinion 
will greatly weaken a number of the safety 
features in the new law. It will not, how- 
ever, limit the language test nor does it in 
any manner restrict the requirements as to 
the "able seaman" standard of efficiency. 

The party most injured by the decision is 
the traveling American public. Yet, it is a 
most remarkable and significant fact that 
many so-called American newspapers have 
hailed the Attorney-General's opinion with 
undisguised joy. Just why any American 
should be pleased to have the safety fea- 
tures of the Seamen's law limited to Amer- 
ican vessels is very difficult to understand, 
unless it be on the theory that American 
capital invested in foreign ships is at the 
bottom of that strange manifestation. 

The Attorney-General's opinion follows 
in full, just as submitted to President Wil- 
son : 

Washington, D. C, August 25, 1915. 
To the President: 

Sir: — I have the honor to acknowledge the 
receipt of your letter of June 18, 1915, wherein, 
in connection with certain accompanying papers 
submitted by the Secretary of Commerce, you 
ask my opinion as to whether foreign cargo or 
foreign passenger steam vessels leaving ports of 
the United States are subject to the regulations 
prescribed by section 14 of the so-called "Sea- 
men's bill," approved March 4, 1915. 

I am of opinion that when not actually carry- 
ing passengers neither foreign cargo nor foreign 
passenger steam vessels are subject to the pro- 
visions of this section. Only foreign private 
steam vessels carrying passengers from any port 
of the United States to any other place or 
country are so subject. To this latter rule, 
however, an exception must be noted in favor 
of a vessel belonging to a country whose in- 
spection laws at the time of the voyage approxi- 
mate our own and which accords to our vessels 
like privileges of home inspection; provided such 
vessel is (1) possessed of an unexpired inspec- 
tion certificate properly issued under and evi- 
dencing compliance with such foreign laws, or 
(2), where its certificate so issued has expired, 
it has properly obtained in lieu thereof from the 
Secretary of Commerce a special permit to de- 
part from a port of the United States if posses- 
sing an unexpired certificate. My reasons for 
this conclusion are as follows: 

This section 14 of the Seamen's bill is an 
additive amendment to section 4488 of the Re- 
vised Statutes, which itself had been previously 
amended in respects not material here by the 
acts of March 2, 1899, 25 Stat. 1012, April 11, 
1892, 29 Stat. 16, and March 3, 1905, 33 Stat. 
1024. Section 4488 was originally enacted as 
section 52 of the act of February 28, 1871, en- 
titled "An act to provide for the better security 
of life on board vessels propelled in whole or in 
part by steam," etc. (16 Stat., 440). Section 41 
of the last-named act, which became section 4400 
of the Revised Statutes, defined the vessels sub- 
ject to the operation of the act, and of course 
to the operation of its section 52, now section 
4488 R. S. This section 41 was amended by the 
acts of August 7, 1882, 22 Stat., 346, March 4, 
1895, 25 Stat., 699, February 15, 1902, 32 Stat., 
34, and March 17, 1906, 34 Stat., 68, the last 
iidmcnt being a complete redraft. Since scc- 
tiim 14 is i pn 1 an amendment of pri 
existing law which is to be found in these 
linns 4400 and 4488 of the Revised Statutes, I 
quote those portions of the same which are 
material as they stood prior to March 4, 1915: 

Sec. 4400. All steam vessels navigating any 
(Continued on Page 10.) 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 20, 1915. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., E. A. Erickson presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping fair. The number of men ashore 
is increasing. 

Notice: A mass meeting under the auspices 
of the International Seamen's Union of America 
will be held at the Seamen's Institute, 242 
Steuart street, San Francisco, on Thursday, Sept. 
23, at 7:30 p. m. Patrick Flynn and Paul Schar- 
renberg will deliver the addresses. Non-union 
seamen are especially invited to attend this 
meeting. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, Secretary pro tern. 

Maritime Building, 59 Clay St. Phone Kearny 
2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 13, 1915. 
Shipping dull; prospects poor. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
213 Hastings St., E. corner of Hastings and 
Main. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 13, 1915. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

H. L. PFTTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 13, 1915. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 

84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 13, 1915. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

J. PEARSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 13, 1915. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
44 Union Ave. North. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 13, 1915. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

JOHN ANDERSON, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 13, 1915. 
Shipping fair; prospects uncertain. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128^ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 7, 1915. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

TACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 16, 1915. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order at 
7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping fair, plenty of men ashore. 
The proposition to appropriate the sum of $1,500 
for organizing purposes on the Atlantic Coast 
was referred to a referendum vote of the Coast 
for four consecutive meetings. The election of 
a delegate to the California State Federation of 
Labor Convention will take place at the next reg- 
ular meeting at Headquarters and San Pedro. 
The full Shipwreck Benefit was ordered paid to 
one member wrecked on the S. S. "Edith." 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

42 Market St. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 9, 1915. 
Shipping slow; plenty of men ashore. 

LEONARD NORKCAUKR, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203. P. O. Box 214. 
Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 8, 1915. 
No meeting. Shipping good; a few men ashore; 
prospects good. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 13, 1915. 
No meeting. Shipping medium; prospects poor. 

THOMAS BAKER, Agent. 
89 Second St. N. Phone Broadway 2306. 



DIED. 

I >. ml I omkins, No. 913, a native of England, 
age II, died at San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 14, 1915. 

Ludwig Jorgen Larsen, No. 548, a nan 
Norway, age 37. drowned at Nushagak, Alaska, 

[une IS, I'M 5 



8 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



THE CHICAGO TEACHERS' UNION. 
i By J. L. Engdahl. 



The profit-hungry plutocrats of Chicago 
and Illinois, in their efforts to drive the 
Teachers' Union from the schools of the 
nation's second largest city, have chal- 
d all the fathers and mothers of the 
land to battle. 

T know that you are ready to fight, and 
fi^ht hard, for the public schools, for your 
sons and for your daughters. 

Millions of you fathers and mothers, just 
this week, sent your children, by the tens 
of millions, back to their desks and their 
books in the public schools, your schools, 
if you insist, otherwise the schools of the 
plutocracy, where your children will learn 
to become the willing slaves of big busi- 
ness. 

The school teachers of Chicago are the 
pioneers among the school teachers of the 
nation. Brave and courageous, they have 
taken the lead. Undaunted and fearless in 
the face of all the terrors that the powers 
of plunder could brine;- to bear against 
them, they have blazed the way toward 
the brighter day. 

They recognized that they must join the 
growing ranks of the labor movement. 
They discovered, long, long ago, that their 
place was in the great industrial struggle, 
in the great economic conflict in the inter- 
.f peace and human emancipation, and 
against militarism and war and the wages 
system. 

They know that Scott Nearing was dis- 
charged from the University of Pennsyl- 
vania, with hardly a whimper from the 
other university professors raised in pro- 
test; and what was Nearing's crime? He 
had helped the masses fight plutes and it 
was a winning fight. 

Brewster was ousted from the University 
of Colorado because he had championed 
the cause of the striking coal miners. The 
voice of protest from the rest of the Col- 
orado University's teaching staff died be- 
fore it was born and "Murderer" Chase, 
adjutant general of the Colorado National 
Guard that brought death to the women, 
children and babes of Ludlow, still holds his 
professorship in the medical department of 
this disgraced institution of learning. 

Nineteen members of the University of 
Utah faculty revolted and quit their jobs 
rather than teach according to the rules laid 
down by the industrial despotism that rules 
the State of Utah, and all that the professors, 
the men of learning of the nation, did in 
support of the cause of these heroic rebels, 
their co-workers, was to appoint a commit- 
tee to "investigate." 

Other big State universities, among them 
the University of Washington and the Uni- 
versity of Wisconsin, are being debauched 
and practically destroyed in so far as they 
were of any real use to living humanity. 

The story of humbled and humiliated State 
universities far removed from the people, and 
with their cowardly and cringing teaching 
staffs, has been written. Another chapter of 
the long struggle to save the nation's public 
schools from the nation's privately owned 
and humanity exploiting industries is now 
being written in Chicago. Shall plutocracy 
succeed? 



SERVICE. 

(By Scott Nearing.) 



If wage-earners were all united in helping 
themselves they would need no help from 
others. 



(For such expressions of opinion as are con- 
tained in the paragraphs below, taken from the 
preface of his book entitled "Income," Professor 
Scott Nearing was dismissed by the trustees of 
the Wharton School of Finance, of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania.) 

Among all of the basic principles of eco- 
nomic life, none is more vital than this — 
that every able-bodied adult should have a 
job; that he should work at the thing for 
which he is best suited and best fitted; and 
that he should be paid the full value of 
what he produces. Society is built upon 
the idea that the people who can shall con- 
tribute their time and energy to the ad- 
vancement of those things in which society 
has an interest. 

Modern economic discussions are being 
turned toward the conservation of human 
values. Thinking men realize that the 
wealth of nations rests upon the fiber of 
the people; that the progress of civilization 
is built out of service. 

Service is of pre-eminent importance. 
In the home, in the street, in the shop, in 
the mine, on the railroad, the greatest sin- 
gle law of life is the law of service — doing 
for others and sharing with others the 
burdens and rewards of effort. The work 
of the world, directed and performed by 
the hand of. man, should have as its final 
object the greatest service to mankind, or, 
as Ruskin put it, "the largest number of 
happy and healthy human beings." Above 
the rights of property there must be placed 
the rights of humanity. 

The industrial system, like every other 
social institution, must serve the human 
race, and serve it efficiently. To-day some 
of the chief questions of economics involve 
the method of apportioning income. Shall 
the values created by industry go to those 
who serve? There seems to be no other 
basis upon which economic society may 
finally rest. 

An effective system of income distribu- 
tion will recognize service as the greatest 
economic asset; will reward service with 
the values that service creates. Until those 
who serve receive a return equal to the 
value of their service, the questions of 
income distribution can never be settled, 
because until then they never can be set- 
tled right. 



It will scarcely be credited that, when the 
Crimean war broke out, Germany had two 
boats of a type useful to the British Navy, 
which had none of that class itself. These 
were two shallow-draft Prussian gun ves- 
sels, the "Nix" and the "Salamander." for 
which Great Britain gave one fifth-rate man- 
of-war. the "Thetis," 36 guns, built at Devon- 
port in 1844, at a cost of £51,926. The Ger- 
man boats were re-named "Weser" and "Re- 
cruit," and used near the Dardanelles. Ger- 
many certainly got the "Thetis" but did not 
appear to have had the conveniences to repair 
her. for she put into Portsmouth December 
29, 1856, for repairs to her copper. By an 
Admiralty order, dated July 9, 1862. England 
sold to the Prussian Government the sixth- 
rate man-of-war "Niobe" for £15,891 18s. 
lid. She was built at Plymouth in 1847, at 
a cost of £ 23,018. The acquisition from 
England of the "Thetis" and "Niobe" was 
the start of the present great German Navy. 



SAVIORS OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOL. 



Labor will never realize its rights until 
it recognizes its wrongs. 



The National Association of Manufacturers 
has come to the aid of the American public 
schools. Realizing that our public school, 
in spite of its defects, is the most potent 
factor we have for the education of the 
young and, being aware that the kind of 
education the youth receives to-day is the 
thing that will determine the kind of a 
citizen he will be to-morrow, the National 
Association of Manufacturers has decided 
that it will safeguard its future interests 
by using its influence to see that the young 
people of our land are taught the dignity 
of labor, the evils of leisure, the ennobling 
effect of earning one's living, contentment 
for things as they are, respect for superiors 
and the rich rewards of docility and obe- 
dience. 

They have begun the dissemination of 
such ideas with no little earnestness and 
activity. They are now distributing, free 
of cost, tracts upon such themes as the 
following: 

The Disadvantages of Labor Unionism. 

The Goal of the Labor Trust. 

The Boy and the Law. 

Industrial Education as an Essential Factor 
in Our National Prosperity. 

Americanism the True Solution of the Labor 
Problem. 

Injunctions. 

The Doom of the Boycott and the Boycott 
Abandoned. 

What Docs the Closed Shop Mean to You? 

Cruel Unionism. 

The Union Label a Detriment to Business. 

The Law's Supremacy. 

The Crime of the Century. 

Each of these pamphlets bears a circular 
number and on each is advertised the com- 
plete list with the solicitous announcement 
that any or all will be gladly sent for the 
asking. Nor that only; without the ask- 
ing, this material is being sent to school 
superintendents all over the country, many 
of whom, in their zeal to be up-to-date in 
the matter of industrial education, welcome 
the ideas with open minds. In fact they 
frequently give it greater credence than it 
would naturally receive because it comes 
from such an eminent (?) source. 

In order to get a fair idea of the nature 
of the subject matter of these pamphlets 
it is but necessary to notice briefly a few- 
extracts from pamphlets Nos. 22 and 28 
both of which are entitled "Industrial Edu- 
cation." 

On page seven of No. 28 we read as fol- 
lows : "Says Carlyle: 'The latest gospel 
in this world is, Know thy work and do it.' 
All true work is sacred. In all true work, 
be it but true hand labor, there is some- 
thing divine." On page eight of the same 
pamphlet this knockout blow is dealt those 
who believe in freeing the world from 
work as much as possible: "Is there not 
a lesson for us in the recollection that 
when God made Adam, He immediately 
set him to work? He put him in the gar- 
den 'to dress and to keep it.' And later, 
when He gave to the world His Only Son, 
He put him in a carpenter shop where he 
learned a trade, and knowledge and wisdom 
came unto him." On the same page they 
produce Solomon as a champion of their 
interests with the following: "Said Solo- 
mon, 'Wherefore, I perceive it is well that 
a man rejoice in his work, for that is his 
portion.' " Of course they forget that Sol- 
omon issued such statements for the benefit 
of his slaves, while for himself he chose to 
"consider the lilies" and live as they lived. 

Turning to page twenty-nine of No. 28 
we get in brief the plan by which the man- 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



ufacturers would form the school so as to 
produce the class of docile and obedient 
servants which they so much desire. There 
we read : "Some of us believe that at about 
fourteen years of age, or the end of the 
elementary course, there should be three 
elective courses of two or three years' 
length (1) cultural, (2) commercial, (3) 
industrial — these schools, with their elect- 
ive courses corresponding somewhat to our 
present high schools." They fully realize 
that it is perfectly safe to put the "elective" 
cultural course in the curriculum since only 
the very few can "elect" it and, moreover, 
it is more pleasing to their ears to call it 
an "elective" course. Also, in many cases, 
it keeps the poor child hoodwinked and he 
often thinks that he is not taking a com- 
pulsory course. On page six of pamphlet 
No. 22 we note "The working people of 
the country who wish their children to 
enter the industries take them out of school 
at fourteen, knowing from experience that 
if they stay in school until sixteen they 
will have passed the psychological time 
when industry beckons, will have acquired 
other tastes, and will never enter the in- 
dustries." Thus have the manufacturers 
carefully figured that they must get the 
child at the age when he is most restless. 
What they meant to say was : Get the 
child started in the mill or the factory be- 
fore he has awakened to a realization of 
the value of the arts and the sciences ; be- 
fore he knows the glories of the paths that 
lie ahead for the man who knows; before 
he has felt the love of learning, and he will 
make a faithful and obedient slave until his 
death. Furthermore, they assume, as a 
matter of course, that the working people 
of the country wish their children to enter 
the industries. Yes, the working-class par- 
ents "know from experience" that their 
children must do so. Of course, there is 
never a proletariat parent who would de- 
sire anything more for his child than to 
have him follow in the thorny path of 
his father. 

But not only do the industrial barons 
want to see that the future workers are 
trained to be workers, they want them to 
be workers who will worship at the shine 
of the established. The workers must be 
worshipful of the law ; they must be citi- 
zens who know how slaves should behave, 
and so they propose that we shall break 
away from the industrial subjects enough 
to teach the child his duty to his master. 
Under the caption of "Citizenship" on pages 
eleven and twelve of pamphlet No. 22 is 
the following: "It is not enough to make 
the child a competent industrial worker. 
He must be made a worthy member of 
society. He must be taught his rights and 
his obligations, to himself, his companions 
and the State. Courses in 'Citizenship,' so- 
called, are a very important part of the in- 
dustrial training in Continental Europe, and 
should be. Children arc taught to under- 
stand and appreciate the ordered processes 
of the law." This statement is pregnant 
with significance. How well the manufac- 
turers know that "the ordered processes of 
the law" are on their side. How anxious 
would they be for the child to be taught 
"citizenship" if this were not so? We 
would not care to be understood as speak- 
ing deprecatingly of the teaching of real 
citizenship or of the value of real civics, 
but we most indignantly denounce the idea 
of tcaching'the ethics of slaves. 

Lastly come the resolutions of the noble 



gentlemen who seek to relegate us to the 
middle ages by taking away from our fu- 
ture society the knowledge that has been 
won by the bitter struggles against their 
class throughout the world's history. These 
are to be found on the closing page of 
pamphlet No. 22, and read as follows : 

Resolutions adopted by the National As- 
sociation of Manufacturers, May, 1911 : 

Resolved, That this association earnestly 
devote itself, with reasonable outlay of 
funds, to the promotion of Industrial Edu- 
cation, to the end that such education may 
be made available, as soon as possible, to 
every child who needs it. 

Resolved, That we favor the establish- 
ment in every community of continuation 
schools wherein the children of 14 to 18 
years of age now in the industries, shall be 
instructed in the science and art of then- 
respective industries and in citizenship. — 
Claude H. Anderson, in The Public. 



JAPAN'S MONOPOLY. 



Japanese actions in Shantung since the 
capture of Tsingtau have given rise to 
much criticism in the foreign communities 
in China. When Tsingtau was captured, 
the Japanese announced the port closed to 
foreign trade and shipping, but promptly 
admitted some of their own vessels laden 
with merchandise, as well as their own 
nationals, to the number of some 10,000. 
The question of opening the port to trade 
is governed by the fact that the mouth of 
the harbor is blocked by three vessels sunk 
by the Germans. Such Japanese vessels as 
entered were small, and made use of the 
very limited accommodation afforded by a 
small harbor, already blocked by military 
requirements. Until the main harbor is 
available unlimited shipping facilities can- 
not be given, and meanwhile the Japanese 
have agreed to four British ships entering 
per month. Immediately on the outbreak 
of war all German ships on the China 
coast made a bee-line for Tsingtau and dis- 
charged their cargoes on the wharves. Of 
the total stuff dumped in Tsingtau some 
10,000 tons, valued at $2,500,000, are 
claimed as being the property of British 
exporters or importers, or as being hypoth- 
ecated to British banks who have negoti- 
ated bills against the documents. The 
Japanese, in regard to this mass of stuff, 
are positive only of one thing, that they 
will not give up anything belonging to a 
German firm. 



King Ferdinand of Roumania, for whose 
favor both sides in the war are bidding, is by 
birth a Prince of Hohenzollern, that is to 
say, a member of the Prussian reigning house 
of which the Kaiser is the chief, while King 
Ferdinand of Bulgaria is a scion of the Ger- 
man sovereign family of Saxe-Coburg and 
Gotha and was born and brought up in Aus- 
tria, where he made his home as an Austrian 
subject until he was elected ruler of Bulgaria 
a little over a quarter of a century ago. 



Why the great joy among the opponents of 
the Seamen's law over the opinion of Attor- 
ney-General Gregory, that the safety-at-sea 
provisions of the law will not apply to the 
ships of those foreign nations whose safety 
laws "approximate" our own? Why the 
great glee that shipowners may continue to 
imperil the lives of passengers?— San Fran- 
cisco Star. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above stated 
reasons, or because of rules of the so-called 
"Welfare Plan," by any agent or represent- 
ative of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied concerns, including the 
masters and officers of the ships. 
Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 

LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 

570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 

BRANCHES AND AGENCIES: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 15 Twelfth Street 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

FORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

HEADQUARTERS : 
71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 445 LaSalle Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS: 
406 N. Clark St., Chicago, III. 
Telephone Main 365. 
BRANCHES: 
Buffalo, N. Y. Toledo, O. 

Cleveland, O. North Tonawanda, N. V. 

Milwaukee, Wis. Superior, Wis. 

Ashtabula, O. Erie, Pa. 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

MARINE HOSPITALS: 

CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 



RELIEF 
Ashland, Wis. 

hi 1 1 -Hi. i Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 
Grand I laven, Mich. 
i ; i een Ray, Mich. 
Houghton, Mich. 
Ludlngton, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 
Erie, Pa. 
Menominee, Mich. 



STATIONS: 
Ogdensburg, N. V. 
Oswego, N. Y. 
Port Huron, Ml 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wli 
aw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 
Saull ste M ii " Mich. 
Sheboygan, Wis. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



of suppressing riot. He protested, and 
protested vigorously. 

"Devotion to public interest compelled 
him to neglect his private business and 
during his term of office he became seri- 
ously embarrassed financially. But in spite 
of this, this man had the resolute honesty 
and iron-like integrity which made him re- 
fuse a bribe of half a million dollars. 1 
know of no man who was more devoted to 
the cause of human liberty, whether it 
was in his own land or in the land of 
strangers ." 



ATTORNEY-GENERAL'S OPINION, 
mtinued from page 7.) 



waters of the United States which are common 
ays of commerce or open to general or 
competitive navigation, excepting public vessels 
United States, vessels of other countries, 
and boats propelled in whole or in part by steam 
ivigating canals, shall be subject to the pro- 
vision- 1.1" this title. (Original section 41). 
And all foreign private .-team vessels carrying 
-cis from any port of the United States 
. ..titer place <.r country shall be subject 
t,, the provisions ..i sections . . . forty-four 
hundred and eighty-eight ... of this title, 
and shall he liable t.. visitation and inspection 
by the proper officer, in any of the ports of the 
United States, respecting any of the provisions 
ut' the sections aforesaid: (Amendment of Au- 
gust 7, 1882) Provided, however, That when 
such foreign passenger learners belong to coun- 
tries having inspection laws approximating those 
.I the United States, and having unexpired cer- 
tificates of inspection issued by the proper au- 
thorities in the respective countries to which they 
belong, they shall be subject to no other inspec- 
tion necessary to satisfy the local in- 
spectors that the condition of the vessel, her 
-, and life-saving equipments are as stated 
in the current certificate of inspection; but no 
such certificate of inspection shall be accepted 
as evidence of lawful inspection except when 
presented by steam \cs-els of other countries 
which have by their laws accorded to the steam 
vessels oi the" United States visiting such coun- 
tries the same privilege accorded herein to the 
steam vessels of such countries visiting the 
United State-; etc. . . . (Amendment of 
February 15, 1902). 

It is further provided that the Secretary of 
Commerce and Labor may, in his discretion, 
permit any foreign passenger steamer coming 
within the provisions of this Act whose foreign 
certificate of inspection shall have expired at 
sea since last having the country to which said 
vessel belongs, or while said vessel shall have 
been in a port of the United States, to sail upon 
her regular route without undergoing any fur- 
ther inspection than would have been required 
n certificate of inspection been in 
force; Provided, however. That such discretion 
shall be exercised only with respect to \ 
operated upon regularly established lines, and in 
where stub foreign passenger steamer will 
be regularly inspected by the authorities of her 
ernment before her next return to a 
port of the United States. (Amendment of 
March 17, 1906.) 

4488. Every steamer navigating the 
■ cean, or any lake, bay, or sound of the United 
States, shall be provided with such numbers of 
floats, rafts, life-preservers (line-car- 
rying projectiles, and the means of propelling 
them) and drag-, as will best secure the safety 
of all persons on board such vessel in case of 
disaster; and every sin-going vessel carrying 
s, and every such vessel navigating any 
of the northern or northwestern lakes, shall 
the life boats required by law, provided 
with suitable boat-disengaging apparatus, so ar- 
ranged as to allow such boats to be safely 
launched while such vessels are under speed or 
otherwise, and so as to allow such disengaging 
apparatus to be operated by one person, disen- 
gaging both ends of the boat simultaneously 
from the tackles by which it may be lowered to 
the water. And the board of supervising inspec- 
tors shall fix and determine, by their rules and 
regulations, the character of life-boats, floats, 
life-preservers (line-carrying projectiles, 
and the means of propelling them) and drags 
that shall be used on such vessels and also the 
character and capacity of the pumps or other 
appliances for freeing the steamer from water 
in case of heavy leakage, the capacity of such 
pumps or appliances being suited to the naviga- 
tion in which the steamer is employed. (Orig- 
inal section 4488 as amended in 1880. shown in 
parentheses.) Every vessel subject to the pro- 
vision- of this title -hall, while in operation 
carry one life-preserver for each and every per- 
llowed to he carried on said vessel by the 
certificate of inspection, including each member 
of the crew; Provided, however, That upon such 
vessels and under such conditions as are speci- 



fied in section forty-four hundred and eighty- 
two floats may be substituted for life-preservers 
. . . etc. (Amendment of March 3, 1905.) 

It will thus be observed that while section 4488 
is directed in terms to "every steamer navigating 
the ocean, or tiny hike, bay, or sound of the 
United States," and t>. "every sea-going vessel 
carrying passengers," section 4400, which pre- 
cedes it, restricts its application to "foreign 
private steam vessels carrying passengers from 
any port of the United States to any other 
or country," provided they be not exempt 
by reason of the conditions set forth in that 
section. 

So the law stood at the time of the passage 
of tlie Seamen's bill. We are therefore con- 
fronted solely with the question whether it was 
tlie intention of that enactment to enlarge the 
class of foreign \es-els to which the inspection 
law- should apply. 

The clause which we are now considering 
reads as follow .- : 

Sec. 14. That section forty-four hundred and 
eighty-eight of tlie Revised Statutes is hereby 
amende 1 by adding thereto the following: "The 
powers bestowed by this section upon the Board 
of Supervising Inspectors in respect of life- 
boats, Boats, rafts, life-preservers, and other life- 
saving appliances and equipment, and the fur- 
equirements herein as to davits, embarka- 
tion of passengers in life-boats and rafts, and 
the manning of life-boats and rafts, and the mus- 
ter- and drills of the crews, on steamers navi- 
gating the ocean, or any lake, bay, or sound of 
the United States, on and after July first, 
nineteen hundred and fifteen, shall be subject to 
the provisions, limitations, and minimum re- 
quirements of the regulations herein set forth, 
and all such vessels shall thereafter be required 
imply in all respects therewith: Provided, 
That foreign vessels leaving ports of the United 
States shall comply with the rules herein pre- 
scribed as to life-saving appliances, their equip- 
ment, and the manning of the same. 

P"or its interpretation we are entitled to re- 
sort not only to the pre-existing laws of which 
it was made a part, but also to its legislative 
history. United States v. Rowen, 100 U. S., 508, 
513; Mycr v. Car Co., 102 U. S., Ill; Drffe- 
back v. Hawke, 115 U. S., 392, 402; United 
State- v. Rurr, 159 U. S., 78, 85, 86. 

The London Convention on "Safety of Life 
at Sea." agreed to on January 20, 1914 (but 
never ratified by the United States), declared a 
purpose to secure "safety of life at sea" (Art. 
I, ch. 2), and made "merchant vessels 
mechanically propelled, which carry more than 
twelve passengers and which proceed from a 
port" domestic to a port foreign, or conversely, 
subject to its provisions (Art. II, ch. 2); and 
obligated the nation to which the ship be- 
longed to accomplish the necessary legislation 
to make the Convention effective. (Art. Ill, ch. 
2; Art. XXXIV, ch. 5; Arts. LVII, I.XI, LXV, 
ch. 7; and note found opposite section 65 in 
Senate Document No. 476, 63d Cong., 2d Sess., 
ordered printed May 1, 1914.) 

At the date last mentioned the La Follette 
bill (S. 136 1 was pending in Congress. On 
June 29, 1914, the House Committee on Mer- 
chant Marine and Fisheries (Rep. 852, 63d Cong., 
2d Sess.) recommended an amendment to Senate 
bill No. 136, striking out all after the enacting 
clause and inserting in lieu thereof the so-called 
Alexander bill (11. R. 4616). This substitute, 
with certain modifications (all of minor im- 
portance save the proviso here involved) was 
passed as the so-called "Seamen's bill." Section 
14 first appeared in this substitute. That part of 
it which precedes the proviso remained un- 
changed until passage. The proviso now in ques- 
tion was added thereto by a later conference 
amendment. 

This section 14 deals entirely with life-saving 
appliances and methods. As to appliances, it re- 
lates chiefly to life-boats, of which the report 
( Xo. 852) said: 

The life-boat provisions in the Committee 
substitute, as applied to ocean-going vessels of 
the United States, are substantially those con- 
tained in the Convention on Safety of Life at 
Sea, adopted at London January 20, 1914. They 
are applied in a modified form to United States 
vessels in ocean voyages on routes not more 
than twenty miles off shore and on the Great 
Lakes to meet the conditions in those services. 

Of the amendatory proviso, 

That foreign \e-sels leaving ports of the 
United States shall comply with the rules herein 
prescribed as to life-saving appliances, their 
equipment, and the manning ..f the same, 
the conference report said: 

While section 4488 of the Revised Statutes, 
which is amended by section 14, seems to apply 
to foreign vessels, as well as vessels of the 



United States, the proviso was inserted by the 
conferees to make it clear that it shall so apply; 
and the Chairman, when the report was under 
consideration, said: 

It was considered necessary. But at the same 
time perhaps it was not necessary, because I 
believe under the law that would be so anyway. 
We wanted, however, to make it clear. I think 
under the statute, that would be true. (Vol. 52, 
pt. \ .. Cong. Rec, 63d Cong., 3d Sess., pp. 4o4n, 
4733. 4736.) 

1 think it clear that the foreign vessels SO 
mentioned in this proviso are such foreign ves- 
sels, and no other, as were already subject to 
the pre-existing law. There are a number of 
reasons which lead irresistibly to this conclusion. 

When we read the proviso with the remainder 
of section 14 we are not embarrassed by the 
canon of construction that additional meaning 
must be given, if possible, to additional language, 
because the conference committee (the author 
of the proviso) expressly declared that it was 
not meant to enlarge the class of foreign ves- 
-el- which were to be subject to the new regula- 
prescribed by section 14, but only to make 
it clear that such foreign vessels as were al- 
ready subject to the operation of section 4488 
should remain subject to the new- regulations. 
We thus have from a high source a declaration 
of the legislative intent. 

Wain, it must be remembered that this section 
14 is not original or independent legislation, but 
purports to be a mere amendment of a pre-exist- 
ing section, itself always restricted to a limited 
class of vessels. In order that the proviso may 
be given a broader scope than the section 
amended, the legislative purpose to that effect 
must be clearly manifest. Thus it is said in 
Sutherland on Statutory Construction, second 
edition, 1904 (p. 444): 

"The effect of an amendment of a section of 
the law is not to sever it from its relation to 
other sections of the law, but to give it operation 
in it- new form as if it had been SO drawn orig- 
inally, treating the whole act as a harmonious 
entirety, with its several sections and parts 
mutually acting upon each other." Where a 
proviso is added to a section by amendment it 
will be strictly con-trued and will be applied 
only to that section, unless a contrary intent is 
clear. 

If we read the words "foreign vessels" in the 
proviso as meaning "all foreign vessels." this 
would include foreign men-of-war and foreign 
sailing vessels, although domestic vessels of 
both classes are wholly exempt from the opera- 
lion of the statute. As to war vessels, such 
a construction would, of course, invite serious 
questions of constitutional and international law; 
and it would enlarge the class of vessels sub- 
ject to the operation of section 4488, contrary 
to the declared intention of the conference com- 
mittee. 

This limitation of a phrase by its context is 
a familiar rule in statutory construction. Re- 
peated instances occur in this Seamen's bill itself 
of the use of the general words "a vessel," "any 
vessel," "no vessel," or "the vessel" (sections 5, 
9, 13 and 19), where, probably as to all, and 
necessarily as to some (sections 9 and 19), the 
words must have a narrower meaning. So the 
very words "foreign vessels," which appear in 
section 18 of the act, are by the context in which 
they there appear plainly limited to "foreign ves- 
-el- subject to the operation of this act." 

I conclude, therefore, that the words "foreign 
Is" in the proviso under discussion can 
only be re. id ,i- "foreign vessels subject to the 
operation of section 4488, of which this proviso 
is amendatory." This reading meets the declared 
purpose of the conference committee; accords 
with the principles of construction applicable 
to such an amendatory proviso; and makes the 
amendment harmonize with the large underlying 
purpose (security of life) of the section on which 
it was imposed, and also of the act to which 
that section belongs. 

As noted at the outset, certain "foreign private 
steam vessels carrying passengers" are exempt 
from the provisions of the act, to wit, those 
belonging to countries having inspection laws 
approximating those of the United States and 
possessing either unexpired certificates of in- 
spection, or in lieu thereof sailing permits is- 
sued by the Secretary of Commerce. The scope 
of this exception depends, of course, on the 
meaning to be given to the word "approximate." 

What inspection laws do and what do not 

approximate" those of the United States is 

necessarily a mixed question of law and fact. 

As such, it must primarily be determined for 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



their own guidance by the proper officers of 
that Department of the Government charged 
with the administration of these navigation laws. 
If their determination should be controverted 
by the vessel-owners, the issue is one for judi- 
cial determination like any other disputed fact. 
Speaking generally, the term "approximation" 
is not synonymous with identity, but indicates 
merely substantial and material accord. Trivial 
and unsubstantial differences should be disre- 
garded, as also requirements in the foreign laws 
additional to and beyond our own. The phrase 
also contemplates "approximation" not at the 
date when it was added to the law, to wit, 1902, 
but approximation from time to time as the in- 
spections and voyages occur. 

Questions as to the proper issuance of foreign 
certificates of inspection; as to whether such 
foreign countries accord to the steam vessels 
of the United States visiting those countries 
the same privileges as arc offered in the 
amendment of 1902 to steam vessels of those 
countries visiting the United States; as to 
whether vessels claiming the privilege of the 
Secretary of Commerce under the amendment 
of 1906 are those operating upon regularly es- 
tablished lines; and as to whether such vessels 
will be regularly inspected by the authorities of 
their home government before they next return 
to a port "f the United States, — all these are of 
a similar nature and should be similarly re- 
solved. 

Respectfully, 

T. W. GREGORY, 
Attorney-General. 



PACIFIC COAST MARINE. 



Commissioner French of the California Indus- 
trial Accident Commission conducted a public 
hearing at the San Pedro City Hall during the 
past week to investigate the average earnings 
of longshoremen at that port and fix a basis for 
making awards under the employers' liability 
act. The case is the outgrowth of the fatal 
accident several months ago, when Carl Gul- 
branson was killed. The Commission awarded 
the widow $2700, on a basis of annual earn- 
ings of $900 per year, which she declined to 
accept. Local longshoremen contend that their 
average earnings are higher and that employers 
should be held liable for at least an annual 
wage scale of $1000, the San Francisco basis. 

L'. P. Lee, manager of the export depart- 
ment of Carstens & Earles, with headquarters in 
Seattle, has been notified that the British Ad- 
miralty has commandeered the steamer "Holt- 
eye" to carry a 3,000,000-foot shipment of rail- 
road ties from the Sound to Great Britain. The 
"Holteye," which has a cargo capacity of 4,000,- 
000 feet of lumber, sailed August 10 from Al- 
giers for Hampton Roads, where she will re- 
ceive the order to come to Puget Sound. The 
commandeering of the "Holteye" is serving to 
center attention on a condition with which the 
Puget Sound lumber industry has had to wrestle 
since the outbreak of the European war, and it 
also shows that the conditions had become more 
acute. The lumber in question was purchased 
from Carstens & Earles. 

The pending suit between the British and 
American marine underwriters to determine 
which shall bear the expense of the damage 
sustained by the British steamer "Queen Alex- 
andria," which put into San Francisco in a dis- 
abled condition about two years ago, has again 
been set for trial in the Federal Court at San 
Francisco on September 27th. Captains Par- 
sons, Gunderson and Staples and E. M. Cherry 
have been summoned as witnesses from here. 
The "Queen Alexandria" sailed from the Co- 
lumbia River with a cargo of lumber and had a 
heavy list when she crossed out. The claim 
is made by the American Underwriters who 
carried the cargo insurance that the vessel was 
unseaworthy and therefore the hull insurance 
should pay the damage not only to the hull 
but to the cargo as well. The entire loss is 
said to have been approximately $75,000. 

While telegraph instruments ticked greetings 
and a thousand workers in overalls, and visitors 
to the Union Iron Works made the air ring with 
their cheers the "Eurana," the latest and most 
modern of freighters, was sent from the ways 
on September 11. The vessel was launched by 
the pressing of a telegraph key in Bethlehem, 
Pa., 3,000 miles away, by Mrs. Eurana E. 
Schwab, wife of Charles M. Schwab, the steel 
magnate, after whom the vessel was named. 
Mrs. John McGregor, wife of the president of 
the Union Iron Works, acted as local sponsor 
for the "Eurana" and smashed a bottle of Cali- 
fornia wine over the bow of the big vessel as 
it slid into the waters of the Pacific, after be- 
ing released by Mrs. Schwab from the shores 
of the Atlantic. \ special direct Western Union 
wire had been installed between the Schwab 
home and the iron works and immediately 
preceding and following the launching of the 
"banana" mes'sages of congratulation and greet- 
ing were sent hurrying back and forth. 



THE FLAG AS AN ASSET. 



An American corporation, colloquially 
known as the Shipping Trust, sails its ships 
under the British flag. That is not very 
American. A foreign corporation is enti- 
tled to put its ships under American regis- 
try. Conceivably, foreign-owned ships un- 
der the American flag could be turned 
against this country in the event of war, 
if the foreign owners deemed such action 
patriotic from their standpoint. 

The La Follette law, for one thing, wants 
to provide American ships with American 
crews. An American corporation, sailing 
its ships under the British flag, does so to 
get labor cheaper than American labor. 
'Ibis American corporation buys the ships 
of another American corporation, sailing 
ships under the American flag, to put the 
ships so bought under British registry. 
All this to evade the La Follette law. 

It is claimed that the La Follette law, 
Americanizing ships' officers and crews, will 
make the sailing of American ships so ex- 
pensive in the matter of labor, equipment 
and provision for safety, that there will 
be no profit on a ship under American 
registry. So the foreign ships that have 
taken out American registry are likely to 
be turned against us in a war with the na- 
tion in whose citizens or subjects the own- 
ership is vested, while the American cor- 
poration owning ships doesn't care enough 
for the American flag to hoist it at the 
stern of its vessels. 

The American-owned ships are foreign 
ships, and the foreign-owned ships are 
American only until the owners want to 
use them against us. And that's the kind 
of an American mercantile marine we have 
to-day. This country wants something less 
amorphous nationally. It wants an Amer- 
ican merchant marine that is Nationally- 
owned and officered and, so far as may 
be, manned. 

If the La Follette law will kill Amer- 
ican shipping it should be amended. But 
— we must remember that it is American 
corporations with their ships under for- 
eign flags that are fighting the law to 
Americanize our shipping as to its per- 
sonnel and putting every possible obstruc- 
tion in the way of the Government's pro- 
posal to buy or build ships that shall be 
sailed in the interest of American busi- 
ness and commerce. American corpora- 
tions won't sail ships under the American 
flag unless they are paid to do so. They 
want a subsidy in order to be patriotic. 

Foreign owners of ships want the use of 
the American flag only to enable them to 
sail the oceans with American protection 
against warships and submarines. The flag 
is an asset — someone said erstwhile. Here 
we see it so considered in a most disgust- 
ing fashion. Shipping concerns are trading 
in the flag in the spirit of the basest com- 
mercialism — on the one hand, the subsidists 
want to blackmail the country into paying 
them to fly the flag; on the other, our 
flag is used in foreign interests. 

President Wilson wants free American 
ships — free of subsidy graft on the one 
hand, free of foreign investors' domination 
of operation on the other. And he wants 
a low tariff, so that goods for America can 
be shipped cheaply and plentifully, in 
American bottoms. He does not want 
American ships with a tariff that will keep 
<joods out of America.— Reedy's Mirror. 



Labor's Economic Platform 

Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

nnnnnnnnnnnnannDnnnDDDnnnnnnDDnnnn 

International Seamen's Union 
of America 



(Continued from Page 5.) 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 58 Commercial St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1408% Western Ave., P. O. Box 
875. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 242 Flander St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 574. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 42 Market St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Pier No. 1, Room G3, T\ O. 
Box 214. 

PORTLAND, Ore., Room 10, Bickle Bldg., 27% 
Second St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO. Cal., 49 Clay St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash.. 84 Seneen St., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

nnnDDnDDDDDnaDnnnnnnnDnnDnDnDDnnnn 

The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 

any of the above-mentioned places; 

i o at the headquarters of the 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Labor News. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Office Phone 
Elliott 135 



ronto, Ontario, unionists are in- 
vestigating the claim that girls are 
employed long hours in that city. 
These workers are employed in war 
munitions factories and also as wait- 
resses. 

Wiley E. Jones, State Attorncy- 
General of Phoenix, has ruled that 
where companies pay in brass checks 
or other scrip same must be re- 
deemed in cash or prosecutions will 
follow. The same ruling appli< 
"company" stores. 

At the wage adjustment hearing 
before the Providence, R. I., Board 
Arbitration, street car men tes- 
tified that the present wage basis 
is unfair, and that no extra pay for 
Sunday work is allowed. It was 
shown that in the case of one mo- 
torman the lowest weekly wage 
was $5.61 and the highest $14.05. an 
average of $1070 from January 2, 
1015. to April 17, 1915. 

The ''labor forward" movement 
now being conducted by the Spring- 
field. Mass., Central Labor Union, 
is devoting special attention to or- 
ganizing machinists. This has re- 
sulted in an eight-hour day without 
wage decreases in some of the larg- 
er shops. Over 500 machinists have 
joined the union of their craft. 
Meetings are being held at the shop 
gates. A federal union of button 
workers has been organized. These 
workers have settled their strike 
and secured gains. The State 
Board of Arbitration assisted. The 
textile industry is being given much 
attention by the "labor forward" 
committee and English and foreign 
speakers report that these meetings 
arc well attended. 

Colorado's State Industrial I 
mission, acting under the recently 
enacted strike and lockout law, in- 
terfered in the strike of employes of 
a Denver cracker company. The 
company reduced wages and the em- 
ployes promptly struck. The Com- 
mission at once ordered the em- 
ployes to return to work and the 
compay to restore the old rate of 
wages. The law requires that be- 
fore wages may be reduced or a 
strike or lockout begun the Com- 
mission must be given thirty days' 
notice. The Commission must in 
the meantime investigate and report. 
Its recommendation, however, need 
not be accepted by either party. 
Union leaders complain that the sole 
effect of the law will be to give the 
company thirty days in which to 
import strikebreakers. 

Mr. Rockefeller, philanthropist and 
benefactor, announces a reduction 
"f working hours from ten to eight 
in his refineries at Bayonne, N. J., 
and elsewhere. The announcement 
says: "In accordance with the poli- 
cies of this company to keep its 
wages and working conditions equal 
to, or in advance of, the wages and 
working conditions of other men do- 
ing a similar class of work, it has 
been decided to adopt the eight-hour 
day. The change will be made with- 
out loss to the men." This decision 
is received with much pleasure by 
Bayonne workers, who now agree 
with trade unionists that "no strike 
was ever lost." The decision benefits 
Mr. Rockefeller, also, as it will 
weaken contrary claims as to his 
company's policies at Bayonne, made 
by the Commission on Indusrial Re- 
lations, and it will check any agita- 
tion toward further investigation of 
the bad conditions under which his 
oil refinery workers labor. 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-date methods in Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy. 
Compasses adjusted. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



PIER NO 1. 



Established 1890 



EureKa, Cal. 



■•o — ■ *V *«^V^V^VN»N* l N/ t 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

ALASKA HOTEL 

CORNER WESTERN AVENUE AND 

SENECA STREET 

New Building— New Furniture 

26 cents and up per Day 

Special Rates Per Week 

FREE BATHS 

PETER DESMORE. Proprietor 

SEATTLE 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 

Seattle, Wa*h., Letter List. 



Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 

Postofflce, letters addressed in care of 

' Union Agency at Seattle can 

not be held longer than 30 days from 

livery. If members are unable 

to call or have their mall forwarded 

iat period, they should notify 

■nt to hold mall until arrival. 

Mann, Emil 
Moyer, Wm. 



Alirnh.-imsen, 

Ilalptan 
Andersen, Hjalmar 
Andersen, P. T. 
Berntaen, T?ernt 
Brower, Geo. 
Buoknam, J. W. 
Carlson. Herbert 
Chrisha n 
Chrlstensen. 
Chudelow, Geo. 
Edvords, John 

rs, .Tohn 
Engebretsen, Ed. 
Edverdsen, Anton 
Edson, Frank 
Prison, Peter D. 
Gilbert, Arthur 
Glademo, Lars 
Gundorsen. Peter 
Gustafson, Karl 
Hansen, Alex M. 
i lansen, John 
Hatton, Pete 
Hughes, W. L. 
Hansen, C. 
Howard, Geo. 

on, Walde- 
mar 
Jansewitch, John 

n. Oscar 

n. S. 

son, Bd. 

Johnson, Emil 
Jorgensen, Fred 

sen, Tengils 
Johanson, Wm. 
Kalnlng, Jacob 
r.arsen. Albln 
Larsen, John 
Larsen. Pete 
Lai-sen, K. -1560 

en, L. A. 
Larson. Olaf 
Leirdman, C. H. 
Leonard. John 
Lundherg. C. 
T.'itten. Theo. 
M tones, John 



Martensen, Ingoald 
Martensen, Knist 
Martinsohn. P. A. 

Mathisen, Martin 
Mathlsen, Sigurd 
McNiell, Ross 
TrygoeMoen, Tryger 

Anton Mortensen, J. H. 

Mlkkelsen, K. -1620 

Moore. C. R. 
Nass, T. M. 
Nelsen. Oscar J. 
Nohereit, Gust 
rd. Oluf 
C. E. 
Olsen, Edwin 
Olson, O. 
Olson, J. E. 
Olson. E. -flfiB 
Olson. Harald 
Olsson, C. 
Pestoff, Sam 
Petersen, A. -1223 
Petersen. ITnuo 
Petterson, Harrv 
Petersen, Hurl M. 
Onains, Nirk 
Qulgle, R. E. 
i luleley, Tom 
Ramhorg. Barney 
Renstrom, A. G. 
Roos, Axel El. 

Erling 
Rehweistous. W. 
Shankat. TInns 
Simminghjlm. G. 
Speller, Henry 
Stone. C. T,. 
Telchert, Karl 
Thomsen. 1 
Thompson. Pete 
Toriusen, G. T. 
T^rsln. Johnnnos 
Vpekenstedt, Billle 
Waagen. C. O. 
Wall, TV'. 
Wetland, John 



Pho:ie Main 1202 

L. V. WESTERMAN 

CLOTHIER 

FURNISHER and HATTER 

ALASKA OUTFITTER 

220-222 First Avenue South, at Main 
SEATTLE 



MERCANTILE LUNCH 

is the place for a good and quick service 

233 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 

Teddy S Hagan 

Proprietors 



*^/N^^VN/V^^VVN^S^S^S^S/VV^i*^/>/V , ^N/VN^^>i^^Ni^WN* •VS^i 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the ' 
Beauty," the "Princess" and 
high grade union-made cigars. 



Little 
other 



612 



Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

Fourth St. - - Eureka, Cal. 



BONNEY-WATSON CO. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 

NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH 
Four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor in New York Nautical College. 

Room 4187 ARCADE BUILDING 

Next Room to Masters, Mates and Pilots 

Association 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire- Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNG 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers in Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 

VVVVVVVVS^A/rfV*/SAiVS^/VVNrVWVVVVVVWV , «A 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

— or — 

A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 
EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



SAILORS' OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS, 
SAILORS' SINGLETS 

Everything Union Made 

PAGE & SCHWARTZ 

Cor. Second and E Sts., Eureka, Cal. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



V^/VSA^^V^^VVVVWVWVS/VVVVVVVVVVSAAAA 



Tacoma Letter List. 



Olsen. Martin E. 
Paterson. John 

>n. Fritz Leo- 



Cords, W. A. 

Evertsen, Olof 

Farrell. William 

Haugan. Arthur nard 

sen. Christian Schmidt, Louis 
Linen. W. Thomas, Paul 

Line, Wictoi rjllman, I 

Murphy, l ';•.< 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



Carl Kristianson, who shipped on 
the bark "Nuanu" in September, 

1912, from Honolulu to San Pedro, 
was on the bark "Allen" and 
schooner "Repeat" previously. Any- 
body knowing his whereabouts please 
notify his mother, Mrs. Anna Kris- 
tianson, Majornas, Route 6, M. 27, 
Lilla B. Nystrama St., Gothenborg, 
Sweden. 5-13-14 

Frank Melson, who went as fire- 
man on the S. S. "Maye" from Phila- 
delphia to New Orleans, in May, 

1913, is inquired for by his mother. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify Mrs. G. W. Paruin, 
4309 Westminster avenue, W. Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

George Barrett, who, on November 
12, 1912, left the ship "Port Logan" 
at Newcastle, of which he was an 
apprentice, is inquired for by his 
mother, his father having died. Any- 
one knowing the whereabouts of this 
lost son please at once communi- 
cate with Amelia Barrett, 1 Wood- 
land Place, East Greenwich, Lon- 
don, England. 3-3-15 

Otto E. Bickel and John Sherman 
Bickel, brothers, who have not been 
heard of for many years, are in- 
quired for by their sister. They are 
both tall, light complexioned, and blue 
eyes. Any information regarding 
their whereabouts will be highly ap 
preciated. Please address Miss Laura 
Bickel, 1591 East Ninety-third street, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 4-14-15 

Knut Jensen No. 5018, a member 
of the Lake Seamen's Union, a 
native of Denmark, is inquired for 
by his wife, Lieschen Jensen, of 
Sangcmunde, A/Elbe Ostenerweg, F. 
Germany. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify the Lake 
Seamen's Union, 133 Clinton street, 
Milwaukee, Wis. 4-14-15 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON. Prop. 



Eureka, Cal., Letter List 



Contreras, Julio 
Erlksen, Anton 
Lomas, Richard 



Lawrence, Harry 
Nllsen, Nils 
Thorsen, Fredrick N. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Johan Hilmar Hansen, a seaman 
who was last heard from in Seattle, 
Wash., in 1911, is inquired for by his 
father, Anton Hansen, Nygaten 34, 
Moss, Norway. 5-13-14 

Alex McDonald, formerly of Dun- 
dee, Scotland, who has not been 
heard of for 22 years, but is thought 
to be sailing on the Pacific Coast, 
is inquired for by Jas. Perry, 30 
Bridge End, Buckpool, Buckie, Eng. 

5-13-14 

Fred Riley, a colored seaman, last 
heard from at Genoa, Italy, and at 
other times from ports in Australia 
and at Liverpool, England, is sole 
heir to his mother's estate. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts kindly no- 
tify Mr. John E. Selkirk, Attorney- 
at-Law, 100 Erie Co. Bank Bldg., 
Buffalo, N. Y. 6-24-14 

Henry Smallwood, a native of New 
York, is inquired for by his mother. 
Anyone knowing his present where- 
abouts please notify the following 
address: Mary Smallwood, Academy 
of the Holy Name, 200 Fair Oaks 
Ave., Pasadena, Cal. 7-29-14 

Alfred Petersen Hilland, a native of 
Bergen, Norway, age about 44, is in- 
quired for by his brother, Randolf 
Petersen. Any one knowing his 
whereabouts please notify Sam An- 
derson, address 100 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 7-22-14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 



Portland, Ore. 



*VWW»*WV% I 



WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 
For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 

DDnnDnnnnnnannnDDnnDnnDDDn 



NEW AND SECOND HAND 
CLOTHING 

WEINER'S BARGAIN 
HOUSE 

Shoes, Hats, Suitcases 

Furnishings and Tools 

French Dry and Steam Cleaning 

UNION SHOP 

35 NORTH THIRD STREET 

Corner of Cauch PORTLAND, ORE. 



P. ROSENSTBIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers in 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Cent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnside, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. Main 8295 ROSENSTE1N BROS. 



SQUARE DEAL 

RESTAURANT 

Best Meals on the East Side 

$5.50 Meal Ticket for $5.00 

Phone East 406 

371 BURNSIDE STREET 

PORTLAND - - OREGON 

CON. SILVER, Mgr. 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 
DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 
no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treaa. 



ga gas jg' 



Union 

MADE 

Beer 




"Ale 

AND 

Porter 



PERSONAL LIBERTY □ 



DEMAND 



DDnnnDnnnnDnnDnanDDnDannnnnannnDDDDDDnanDnDnnnnnDDanD 

§ VOTE AGAINST PROHIBITION 

c 

c 

L 

a 
a 
□ 

a 
□ 
□ 
□ 

D 

a 
a 
a 
u 
□ 
□ 

B 



*^c^^> Of America 

COPYRIGHT &TRA0E MARK REGISTERED 1903) 



rG^XT 



IN CHOOSING WHAT YOU 
WILL DRINK 

Ask for this Label when 

purchasing Beer, Ale 

or Porter, 

As a guarantee that it is 

Union Made 



THIS IS OUR LABEL 

nDDnDnnnnnDDnnDnnnaDaDnDDDDDnDnDnnannnnnnnnnnnGnaDnan 



Aberdeen, Wash. 



Willamette Cigar Store 

H. SORENSEN, Proprietor 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, 

CONFECTIONERY, FRUIT AND 

SOFT DRINKS 

Corner Front and Burnside, 

Portland, Ore. 

DanDnannnnDaaDaanDDDnaDnnn 



Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Bese, F. 

Bernahrdsen, Chas. 
Bjornlund, Axel 
Bugge, Mr. 
Christensen, H. P. 
Decas, O. 
Dolany, Willie 
Edstrom, John 
Ekberg, Hugo 
Fernandez, Frank 
Geiger. Joe 
Hecker, Wm. 
Halbeck, J. O. 
Holmstrom, Chas. A. 
Henriks, Waldemar 
Ingelbrigsten, O. 
Jensen, Christ 
Jensen, Wm. 
Jegstrup, Harold 
Johnson, Nils 
Jonsson, Karl 
Knopp, Fritz 
Kristiansen, Wm. 
King, J. L. 
Kelly, Patric 
Kjer, Magnus 
Knudsen, Richard E. 
Larsen, H. 
Leonhard, George 
Letchford, A. 
Lindblad, Konrad 
Lindberg, A. C. 
Lindholm, John 
Loeseher, Joseph 
Miller, E. 
McKeating, R. 
Munchmeier, H. 
Miller. Andy M. 
Morgan, Tim 



Muller, P. 
Metts, John 
Moller, L. D. 
McConnell, David S. 
Mark, Thorwald 
Meckermann, Ernst 
Neuling, George 
Nielsen, H. -1253 
Olsen, Arthur 
Ohlsson, J. W. 
Osterberg, Henry 
Oglive, Wm. A. 
Palm, P. A. 
Pedersen, J. A. 

-1515 
Perkins, Paul 
Peterson. M. 
Rabel, John 
Reskran, George 
Rinkel, H. 
Rimmer, Chas. 
Schneider, J. 
Schneider, Fritz 
Swanson, Emil 
Soderlund, Uno 
Sorensen, Jorgen 
Shea, Oscar 
Schacht, H. 
Schultz. John N. 
Selin, Joe 
Salmelin, H. 
Saarinen, W. 
Tuhkanen, J. J. 
Urso, Geozzep 
Vinx, H. 
Windblad, M. 
AVheatcroft, L. E. 
White, Harry 
Westengren, C. W. 



HU0TARI a CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



When In Aberdeen Trade at 
BEE HIVE 

Very best union made Hlckey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, 
Shoes, Underwear, Beddings, Tobac- 
cos, and notions for seafaring men. 
NYMAN BROS. 
304 South F St., Aberdeen, Wash. 
Near Sailors' Union Hall 
Open Evenings 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Andersen, Andrew 
Arnell, John 
Burmeister, T. 
Byman, Alf. 
Bjorklund, G. 
Bowen, J. J. 
Davis, Frank 
Eriksson, -333 
Evensen, Krist 
Gronros, Oswald 
Gueno, Pierre 
Hansen, Halfdan 
Holmroos, W. 
Hansen, Ove Max 
Hylander, Gustaf. 
Jacobson, J. 
Kristiansen, Nils 
Kustel, V. J. 
Larsen, -1804 
I.udtke, Emil 
Malmberg, Ells 
Maonado, Henry 
Munsen, Fred 
Nilsen. -1054 



Nilsen, Harry 
Nordgren, Chas. 
Paaso, Andrew 
Pettersen, Karl 
Petersen, J. 
Peterson, Nels 
Risenius, Sven 
Rundblad, Oscar 
Schmidt, Heinrich 
Simensen, Isak 
Scheftner, Bernhard 
Toves, H. C. 
Thorne, John 
Thompson, S. K. 
Udby, Harold 
Wiksten, Arvid 
Wilson, John 
AValder, Olsen N. 

Packages. 
Glazer, Y. 
Gorgensen, Olaf 
Hansen, John 
MacGuire, O. F. 
Stanners, W. S. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Adolf Krakan, last heard of at Port 
Pirie, January 1912, and again in 
March 1913, from Warumbo, 118 
miles from Adelaide, South Australia, 
is inquired for by his mother at 
Hamburg, Germany. — 8-25-15. 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



TO LET 

Very Desirable, Light 
and Roomy 

Stores and Basement 

— in the — 

Maritime Hall Building 

— on — 

49-59 CLAY STREET 

Between Embarcadero & Drumm Sts., 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Apply to I. N. HYLEN, 49 Clav St. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Iwar Westerberg, age about 50, 
sailing second mate on some steam 
schooner on the Pacific Coast, is in- 
quired for by Gus Englund. Any in- 
formation regarding the above named 
will be gladly received at 214 Jack- 
son street, San Francisco, Cal. 

1-27-15 

Theodore Krakan, last heard of in 
September 1911, at New Orleans, La., 
is inquired for by his mother. Any 
one knowing his whereabouts please 
notify Mrs. Ad. Krakan, Langenvehm 
38 I, Hamburg 22, Germany.— 8-25-15. 



Port Townsend, Wash. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively In Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

Water Street, Port Townsend 

Next door to Waterman & Katz 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Ingvald Andreas Hansen, alias 
Andrew Hansen, a native of Nor- 
way, age about 36; tall, dark; last 
heard of July, 1905. His address 
then was, Andrew Hansen, Karluk, 
Kodiak Island, Alaska. He is in- 
quired for by his mother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify Staff Captain Robert Smith, 
district officer, native work, Alaska, 
Box 925, Wrangell. 4-3-15 

Wilhelm Ekelund, a native of 
Sweden, is inquired for by his 
brother, Axel Ekelund, New Harbor 
Hotel, Drumm street, San Francisco, 
Cal. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify the above ad- 
dress. 3-10-15 




PIGAIW 






This Book Free 

If you want to know more 
about Navigation, we will 
send this book free to you. 
It tells how young men have 
advanced to better positions 
— how they have climbed 
from small beginnings to 
the highest positions of 
master and officers of sea- 
going craft. It is an inspir- 
ing booklet. 

Mark and mail this coupon 
today. 



• international correspondence schools ♦ 

* Box 898, Scranton, Pa. * 

» Please send me your free booklet, explaining ^ 

# Courses In Ocean. Coast, and Lake Navigation. . 

♦ Name 



♦ St. & No.. 

♦ City 



) ♦ 



Home News. 



.State _ 



The Kentucky Democratic conven- 
tion at Louisville on August 31 en- 
dorsed President Wilson for a second 
term. 

The Cobb County (Georgia) grand 
jury on September 2 reported that 
it had failed to find any evidence 
on which to base an indictment for 
the lynching of Leo Frank. 

A reward of $1500 for the arrest 
and conviction of the first three per- 
sons who participated in the lynch- 
ing of Leo Frank has been offered 
by Governor Harris of Georgia. 
In the twelve months ended with 
The New Orleans Steamship As- 
sociation will make formal protest to 
the Dock Board before October 15 
against putting into effect the pro- 
posed changes in port charges. The 
agents say they will be unable to 
meet the demands of the Dock 
Hoard and may have to move from 
New Orleans. 

A mob at Marietta, Ga., rounded 
up eight strangers, whose business 
in town they did not know, and 
placed them aboard a freight train 
leaving town. The strangers ap- 
peared to be laborers seeking work, 
but were suspected of being detec- 
tives seeking information on the 
Frank lynching. 

June 30 last, the population of the 
United States increased by 1,698,000, 
and thereby passed the hundred-mil- 
lion mark, according to estimates of 
the actuaries of the United States 
Treasury Department. Since Jan. 1, 
1879, the increase aggregates 52,494,- 
000, or more than 100 per cent., and 
in the same period the amount of 
money in circulation per capita has 
grown by $18.67. 

President Wilson has signed an 
executive order eliminating 750,000 
acres of land from the Cleveland 
National Forest in California. The 
unwithdrawn land will be subject to 
settlement only under the home- 
stead laws, beginning November 2, 
until and including November 29, 
1915, after which they may be taken 
under the laws applicable thereto. 
The lands lie along the boundaries 
of the National forest in Riverside 
and San Diego Counties, within the 
Los Angeles land district, and about 
333,000 acres thereof are public lands 
and subject to entry. 

Border troubles continue in local 
brawls, and in raids of Mexican ban- 
dits into Texas and Arizona. Forty- 
seven bandits who attacked the No- 
rias ranch 65 miles north of Browns- 
ville, have been killed by posses of 
Texans. An extravagant manifesto, 
known as the San Diego plan, pro- 
claimed the "Republic of Texas" to 
be governed by Mexicans. Twenty- 
six of the leading spirits of the move- 
ment have been arrested in San An- 
tonio. 

The shipment of munitions of war 
to Europe to fill the enormous orders 
placed here have only recently as- 
sumed large proportions. In some 
cases from one-fifth to one-third of 
the total shipments during the year 
went out in June, the last month for 
which returns are available. Of the 
exports of gunpowder, for instance, 
which increased from $247,200 in the 
year ended June 30, 1914, to $5,091,- 
542 in the fiscal year just clo 

$3,234,549 went out in June. Total 
exports of ammunition, firearms, and 

brass in the first eleven months of 
war were worth $67,802,270, against 
$12,341,236 in the same period a year 
bi fori 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




The Vmerican submarine "F-4," 
which sank outside Honolulu Harbor 

cm March J<>. with 22 men, was finally 
raised on August 29. The remains 
uf the crew have been shipped to the 
United Sta 

The Southern Pacific Co.'s steamer 
"El Sud," which stranded in the 
Galveston Channel as a consequence 
of the hurricane, is insured on a 
value of $425,001), being 4,572 tons, 
built in 1899. 

The New York Shipbuilding Co., 
iden, X. J., has booked another 
order from coal shipping interests for 
two steam colliers of about 12,000 
tons deadweight each which will be 
managed in Boston. 

The Bureau of Navigation has pub- 
lished a useful hook containing in- 
terpretations of laws relating to the 
measurements of vessels, together 
with copies of tin- United States laws 
on that subject and the Suez I 
regulations. 

The United States torpedo boai 
destroyer "Perry" has been awarded 
the trophy for the destroyer class 
in the engineering litions of 

1914-15. Twenty destroyers com- 
pli ted the tests, and twelve failed to 
finish their trials. In the submarine 
- the trophy was awarded to the 
"C-3." 

The Royal Netherlands Steamship 
Co, has inaugurated a new line of 
steamers between Amsterdam and 
Callao and Valparaiso, via Panama 
Canal. This line will comprise six 
or seven steamers, sailing from Am- 
sterdam monthly. The Royal Neth- 
erlands Co. operates 50 steamers 
ther. 

Apart from the capture of German 
and Austrian steamers, some indica- 
tion of tlie work done by the P.ritisli 
Admiralty is shown by the number 
of German and Austrian vessels which 
have been compelled to take shelter 
in neutral ports since last August. 
\ list recently issued by Lloyd's 
-hows that 534 German steamers and 
114 German ships had been in neutral 
poiis for the last 12 months, while 
66 Austrian steamers were in a sim- 
ilar position. 

The Fore River Shipbuilding Cor- 
poration has put overboard the last 
two of the ten submarines which it 
is building on account of the British 

i in These boats will not 

be delivered until the end of the war. 
The first batch of twenty submarines 
which the Bethlehem Steel Company 
contracted to build for England have 
been delivered. They were built in 
sections at San Francisco and Quincy, 
Mass., and put together at the plant 
of the Vickers Company at Montreal, 
whence they were sent to England 
under their own power convoyed by 
a cruiser. 

Particulars regarding the consolida- 
tion of the ocean steamship business 
of the Canadian Pacific Company 
with that of the Allan Line are con- 
tained in the company's annual re- 
port. The value of steamship prop- 
erty involved in the transaction is 
estimated at $23,500,000. The new 
company, which will be known as the 
Canadian Pacific Ocean Services, 
Ltd., will be capitalized at $10,000,- 
000. As -tated in the preliminary 
report, the company's gross business 
decreased $31,000,000 for the last fis- 
cal year. As expenses were reduced 
$22,000,000, the net loss was about 
$9,000,000, attributed to "uncontrolla- 
ble conditions" by Sir Tho 
Shaughnessy, chairman and president, 
in the annual report. 



SPECIAL NOTICE! 

Call or send for your Advertised Mail and 
Packages as early as possible. 



San Francisco Letter List. 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail Is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
I. M. Holt, Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 

Anders. in. I til. ling 

Anderson, John O. 

Anderson, Joseph 

Anderson, O. l. 

-1363 

Anderson, P. T. 

-1461 

Anderson, Thos. 

Anderson, Walter 
Andersson, K. E. 

Andersson, Victor 
Andreasen. Kail 
Andreassen, ii. 

-1477 
Andresen, Anton 
Antonsen, ll. -1372 
6BAntonsen, H. -17*3 
Antonson, Viktor 
Ashlund, .las. 11. 
Augustin, Hermann 
Azevedo, Manuel T. 

Binder, Herbert 

Blume, Earnest 
Brevlck, Julian 
Blum, Ernest 
Boro, Severin S 
Bower, <:;. 
Bowman, Jack 
Boy, Geo. 
Bredemeyer, Elmer 

H. 
Brown, Jno. 
Hrown. \\ illiam 
Brunst, Frank 
Bruura, Aksel 
Brunvald, Ed 
lUiaas, Tamas 
Kuckly, J. J. 
Burke, Andrew 
Bush, H. S. 
Bylott. Charles 

Christensen, Alfred 
Christensen, ll 



Abbors, Arne 
Abmeyer, Henry 
Acorn, Albert 
Adams, Hugo 
Aha, Jack 
Alliens, Walter 
Akman, .1" 
Albert, J. 

has. M 
Aimer, John G. 
Andersen, Alfred 

Olal 
Andersen, H. J. 

-1620 
Andersen, John 
Andersen, N. -1549 



Andersen 
Anderson, 
Anderson, 
Anderson, 
Anderson, 
Anderson, 



Otto 

Chr. -17 
Ed 

Ernst 
Fritz 
H. E. 



k. 1 Hck 
an, Paul 
Bahrendts, Carl 
Bakkenson, P. J. 
Bakker. Haajcon 
Han. Martin 
Barrel!, George 
Beier, Jans Chr. 
Beling, Oskar 
Bensen, I. -2164 
Benter, H. 

;ren, I. L. 
Bergstrom, Frank 
Berkllnd, llu* 
Berntsen, Julius 
Berry. David J. 
Bertelsen, Krlstlan 
Biedeman, Aug. 
Biegger, Paul 
Rllke. E. -2n49 
Bllllngton, Martin 

P. 

Cainan, George I. 
Calson, Fred 
Campbell, D. C. 
Campbell, S. 
i \u.-v, Arthur L. 
Carlson. C. E. 
Carlson, C. O. 
Carlson, C. R. 
Carlson, Joe 
Carlson, Julius 
Carlson, Martin 
Carlsson, John 
Carlstrom, Claes 
Catt, Frederick 
Cellan, John 

1 'ahlkvist, Fred 
Daly, John 
Daniel J. C. 
i >anlelson, Eric 
De Baer, Harry 
Denis, I. 

Karling, Gus 
Ebersole, R. E. 
Kchlln, Lester W. 
Eckart, T. G. 
iff, Otto 
Eckstrand, Frank 
Edolf. C. 
Eisenhart, N. 
Eisner, Max 
Elenlus, Axel 
Eliassen, Sigurd 

Falcon, M. 
Fane, James 
Ferguson, B. 
Ferguson. J. 
Fisher. NV. -707 
Fitzgerald, Wm. 
SMtzpatrlck. Potrlck 
Fjellman, Jonas 
Fogartl, Otto 
Follan, Thomas 
Gabrielsen, Peder 
Gallagher, Jas. 
Gart, George 
Gerner, Hans 
Gertonson, Robert 
Gorden, George 
rg, Fred 
Grant, Dave 
Grant, Otto 
Grantley, C. W. 
Graves, Edward L. 
Gronthal. Arthur 
Gross, Ernest 
Hakansson, John 
Hall. H. 

Halvarsen, Henry 
Hammergren, Oscar 
Hannus, Alex 
Hansen, A. -2010 
Hansen. Charlie 

n, Christ 

ti, C. M. 
Hansen, F., -1735 
Hansen, H. 

. . Hans M. 
Hansen. Hans O. 
Hansen, H. C. 
Hansen, H. P. 

Hansen, L. P. 
Hansen. Martin 
Hansen, Norkard M. 
Hansen, Thomas 
Hanson Henrik 
Hass. Wilhelm 
Hauan, Karl 

Ikonem. Joe Isakson, Karl 

Ingebretsen. Olaf Iversen, Ivar 
Insunso, Francisco 



Christensen, I.. -1305 
C'laus, John R. C. 
Clausen, Cha 
Clausen, Chr. 

en, I. 
Coakley. John 

. . Harry 
Collier, H. S. 
I'.illins. E. F. 
Coms ted t, Ernst 
Corlon, B. A. 
Costantinos. Lay 
Countedt, F.rnest 
Crawford, F. 

Dewetrak, C. 
Dixen, Ben 
on, John 
-las, G. Sam. 
Dracar. Ed. 
Dreyer, Jack 

Ellefsen, Otto 
Elllngsen. Fred 
Elllngsen, Wtlhelm 
Emanuelsen, Karl 
lhardt, Ferdi- 
nand 
Erickson. E. R. 
Erlckson, George 
Erickson, John 
Evansen, Louis 
Evertsen, Olaf 

Forde, S. C. 
Foss, John 
Foster, Chas. 
Frazer, James 
Fredholm, Chas. J. 
Fredriksen, Berger 
Fredrickson, F. 
Friedrich, II. 
Funk, Burno 
Furlong, Peter 
Gudmundsen, B. 
Gulllksen, Amandus 
Gumas, Nicholas 
Gundersen, Kristian 
Gundersen, L. I. 
Gunderson, G. A. 
Cunderson, J. C. 
Gunderson, M. 
Gunther, Hans 
.vsen, O. 
Guthre, R. 
Gutman. C. 

.'II. Hans C. 
Haupt, Fritz 
Hawkins. I'. 
Hedenskog, John 
Hel.lt, Charles F. 
Helln, John 
Helsten, Gustaf 
Helberger, M. 
Henrtksen, T. 
Hemes. L -2042 
Hetman, Walter 
Higgins. F. 
Hilderhraneh, A. 
Holbeck, O. 
Holberg. Oluf 
Hole, Si^vnld 
Holmquist. F. 
Holm, Arthur 
Hoist, R. 
Hord. Charlie 
Hoversen, Carl 
Wiihner Carl 
E.lward 



ii, Knud 
Jensen, Nils Oluf 

i. Thoyus 
Jersch, Wilhelm 

ii. Christ 
Johansen, Axel ll. 
Johansen, Carl J. 
Johanson. Edward 
Johannson, Nils 
Johansson, E. A. 
Johansson, J. R. 
. A. -2077 
Johnson, C. J. 

Kaleva, Gustaf 
Kail berg, Arvid 
Karlsun. Wiktor 
Kaspersen, Henrik 
Klnlock, Wm. 
Kinowsky, Adam 
Kleblngat, F. 
Klepzig, Otto 
1, Louie 
Knappe, Adolph 
Knudsen, Daniel 

Laakso, Frank 

. Thoe, E. 
Lake, A. F. -1670 

Larsen, J. -1386 
Larson, John 
Larsen, Julius 

I. a I sell. N. E. 

Larson, Alfred 
Larson, S. Gt. 
Larsson, Karl 
Larsson, K. E. 
Larsson, Ragnar 
Langworth, H. E. 
l.atz, C. 
l>aursen, Chris. 
on, -I P. 
Lebrun, Finest 

Maatta, John 

. David 
Macomber, H. B. 

n, 'J'. 
Madsen, Ludvig 
Makew, W. 
Maki, lvar 
Ma Hand. O. 

i, A if. 
.Manse, l'eter 

Mariner, R. w. 

Markmaiin. 
Markus, Bernhardt 
Marquels, Frank 
Martens, II.. -1892 
Mart. -ns, P. .2262 
Martenstn, J. C. 

2191 
Martin, A. 
Martin, 11. 
Mathiassen, Sigurd 
Matta. Humberto 

Nagel, Adolf 
Nedsen, John B. 
Nelsen, Albin C. 
Nelson, Albert 
Nelson, Alvln 
Nelson, C. 
Nelson, Ernest 
Nelson, Ernest C. 
Nelson, Fred 
Nelson, John 
Nelson, John B. 
Nerby, Kristian 
Norkins. Herman 
Nlcolaisen, Carl 
Nielsen, Edwin N. 
Nielsen, Nils 

_'. Oscar 
Oberg, Mauritz 
O'Brien, R. F. 
Ohland, Chas. 
Oleman, Henry 
Olsen, B. O. L. 
Olsen, C, 1315 
Olsen, Charles A. 
Olsen, G. W. 



on, Christ 
Johnson. E. G. -227 
- 1788 
Johnson. Eric- 
Johnson, John 
Johnson, Julius 
Johnston. William 
Jones, Berthon 
Jones, Joseph 
Jorgensen, Fred 
Jungbere. L. 
Junge, Heinrich 

Kohlmeister, Otto 

K..lk. M. 

K. iln.1. AUg. 

Konstatln, Anist 
Korner, Fred 
Koski, Leander 
Koso, Better 
Krishjan, Karl 
Krlstensen, K. D. 
Kristiansen, Jakob 
Kruk, J. 

Lee, Anker 
Leeikaln, Martin 
Lelrevaag, H. J. 
Leroen, Lars 
Leverridge, H. 
Lewald, Harry A. 
Lewis. Kol.t. \V. 
I. in. Hi, Nils V. 
Llljendahl, Ludvig 
Llndroth. Erik 
Link, i leo, 

n, Richard 
Lonau, John 
Lundberg, Charles 
Lundberg, Harry 
Lundberg, Torsten 
Lundgren, Colmar 
Lunsmann, Henry 

Mattson, Charles 
Mattson, Hai ry 
Mattson, J. 
McKeating, R. 
McLaughlin. M. 
McMalion, Jaek 
M.Manus, J. 
Melba, Chas. 
Menk, Billy 
Mertensen, Henry 
Meyer, Krnest 

1-'. 
Mevers, Max 
Miller, B. P. 
Moller, Louis 
Moore, Albert 
Monsen. C. 
a. L. 
Moyer, William 
Muller, Thorn 
Murphy, J. 

Nielson, Hans F. 
Nlemeyer. Oscar 
Nilsen, Hans I'. 
Ntlsen, John 
Nilsen, ii. K. 
Nllssen, Harry 
Nilsson, HJalmar 
Nor. Niels 
Nordlof, Sigurd 
Norman. Olaf 
Norris, N. A. 
Norton, Edgar 
Nunner. Albert A 

Nunninen, .f. E. 
Nyman, oskar 

Olsen, oie. -hut 

m, C. E. 

Olson, C. O. -: 

Olson. E. W. -1216 

Olson, J. 

Olson, Morten 

Olson, Nick 

Olson, P. 
Olsson, Adrian 



Olsen, John Arthur Olsson, Eric 



Olsen, John 
Olsen, Jorgen 
. X. -502 
Olsen, O. 
Olsen, O. G. .1. 
Olsen. Olaf S. 

Para, E. II. 
George 
Paul man, Geo. 
Paulsen. Aksel 
Paulsen. N. 
Paultln, Martin 
Pedersen, Carl 
Pedersen, H. -1560 
Pedersen. W. G. 
Pergher, Charles 
Persson. John 
Peters, Wm. 
Petersen. II. 

Petersen, Niels 



Ollsson, Carl 
Olsson, James 
Orlllng. Gust 

holm, J. W. 
llSSOwen. Fred 



Petersen, O. -1 
Petersen, Otto 
Petersen, Peter 
Petersen, C. V. 

-.in. 1 1. E. -1688 
Peterson, Oscar 
Peterson, Tom 
PInkiert. C B. 
Plom, Charles 
Poknandt, H. 
Pommer. Jon 

.Ins, Aug 
Punls. Antonl 
Purgold, G. E. 



Qulgley, Robert E. Quinn, William 



Jahrllng, Herm. 
.TsJcobsen, Alfred 
Jansson, Jonas 
.Tnrostnski. Fellks 
Jensen, Carl 



Jensen. C. 
Jensen. H. 
Jensen, Hans 
Jensen. Halford 
Jensen, Henry 



Raalsen , F. 
Raaum, Henrik 
Randolph. J. S. 
Rank, W. 

nusen, P. 
Rasmussen, Emit 
Rasmussen. J. A. 
Rasmussen. J. -446 
Redlnger, Mihel 
Retail, Otto 
Rickes, G. S. 
Rlmmer. C. M. 
Rinta. Karl 
Sanders. Robert 
Sanders. S. 

..n. Alfred 

Sandstrom, Ivar 

Sanne. Rudolf 
Sass, John 
Saunders. James 
Schager, Ernst 
Seheuchte. Olaf 
Schmehl, Jas. r. 
Schmidt, I^ouis 
Schmltt, F. 
Schneider, H. 

Sentt. A. 

Seberg. O. 
Selin. William 
Sellers. Wm. G. 
Sikman. A. 
Siller. E. 
Silver, S. A. 



Ritcher, J. 
Roberts. Frederick 
Roberts. Griff 
Rodin, i 

Rolland. Lars O. 
Rosenquist. A. 
Rotter, R. 
Rudt. Walter 
Rundqulst. O. 
Rutel, Ernest 
Ryan, James 
Ryan, Patrick 

Sivers, Frank 
Simonsen. S. -2046 
Sinnott. Nickolas 
Skegoldenhorg, F. 
Smith, John 
Smith, L. K. 
Smith, Lyman M. 
Snelder, G. 
Soderberg. R. 
Sqlberg. Bernt 
Sorensen, Anton 
Sorensen, Jens 
Sorensen, L. A. 
Sorensen, P. -2722 
Sorensen, Vigo 
Spanas, Nick 
Spanon. James 
Stansbergr, Ivar 
Stein fart. J. H. F. 
Stenberg, Gus 



Stienen, John 
Stlntman, J. 
Stolt, Axel 
Stolzerman, E. 
Strand, Charley 
Strand, Konrad 
Strand. | 

Strati. n. Henry 
Stromberg, O. 

Tamlsar, P. 
Tamilian. K. 
Tanuin. Helge 

. Charles 
Teishert. Karl 
Thompson, Johan 

.n, A. -853 
Thomson. G. E. 

Gus 
Thorn, August 
Uderkull. C. 
Van Frank. W. O. 
Vartnaw, Wm. M. 
Vlckery, Custls S. 
Wacner, Wll 

i Idward 
Walker. Erick 
Wall in. Gustaf 
Walter, John 

-, J. 
Wang, E. 
W.e. William 
Wendel, Bmll 
Wheatcroft, L E. 
White. J. D. 
White, Peter 
Yejola. Yejo 
Zabel. Carl 
Zerket, B. W. 
Zunk, Bruno 



Substad, Pete E. 
Svcndson, J. 
Svensen, Albert 
Scensen. C. J. 
Swanson, E. 
Swanson, Martin 
Swanson, O. 
Szallies, Gustav 

Thorsen, Rolf 
Thorsen. Theodore 
Topel, Fred 
Tlerney, Pat 
Tollinger, A. 
Tonzel, R. 
Traynor, John 
Trepte, A. 
Trledri. h. H. 
Tuchel, Guslav 
Tuppltz, C. 
Ulman, John 
Vlllemayer, Walter 
Vogel, Gus 

Whiteside, Fred 
Wick, John 
Wickstrom, Axel 
Wlhtol. J. 
Williams, J. i'. 
Wills, c.'orge 
Wilson. .1. W. 
Winton. J. A. 
Witt, Otto 
Wold. Olaf -1285 
Woldhouse, John 
Wremmer, George 

Zurenberg, Fritz 
Zweyberg, John 



PACKAGES. 



Apply to Secretary of Sailors" Union 
of the Pacific. 

Olsen. Arne 
Olsen, Carl -1101 
Pennlngrud, Ludwik 



Anderson. A. 
Belling. J. R 
Bllllngton, Martin 
Ceelan, John 

iere, Henry 
Ellefsen, Otto 
Furth. Richard 
Hansen, Karl 
Hansen, Marlus 
Hansen, O 



Persson, Oscar 
Petersen, \ 
Raasch, O. 
Raaum. Henry 
Rarly, Frans 
Rathke, Relnhold 
Relursen. A. L. 



Hendriksen, Hag- Roberts, John 



bart 

Jansson, A. L. 

Johansen. Emll 

Aluf 

Nor. Nils 



Sorensen. Pete 
Smith, Max 
Strasdln. A. W. 
Wakely, R. E. 
Walters, Albert B. 
Wurthman. W. L. 



Phones: Office, Franklin 7756 

Res., Park 6950 
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 6:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. in. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cal. 



TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO ST., near Market 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

'Nut Sed 



FRENCH AMERICAN 
BANK OF SAVINGS 

Savings and Commercial 



108 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Resources . $7,700,000 

Member of Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco 

United States Depository for 

Postal Savings Funds 



DIRECTORS 

G. Beleney J. M. Dupas 

J. A. Bergerot John Glnty 

S. Bissinger J. S. Godeau 

Leon Bocqueraz Arthur Legallet 

O. Bozio Geo. W. McNear 

Charles Carpy X. De Plchon 



nnOOnOOIOUULlJULJOIOaOLnOOOCTEC 
INFORMATION WANTED. 

W. A. Goodrich, who left the Brit- 
ish ship "Puritan" at San Francisco 
February 6, 1911, is inquired for by 
the British Consul-General at San 
Francisco. 

G. Lawrence Ames, formerly em- 
ployed on British steamer "Iguapa," 
larged at Manila, P, I , last 
I of at San Francisco on July 
15, 1914. is inquired for by the U. S. 
Shipping Commissioner at San 
Francisco. 

Charles Anderson, alias Helmik 
Helgesen, a native of Alvestad, Sta- 
vanger, Norway, age 70, is inquired 
for; last time heard from in 1904. 
Anyone knowiner his whereabouts 
please notify his brother, B. H. Al- 
vestad. Tewal, Iowa. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 

(Member of the Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco.) 

The following Branches for Receipt and 

Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mis- 
sion and 21st streets. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. W. 
Corner Clement street and 7th avenue. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. 
Corner Haight and Belvedere streets. 

JUNE 30, 1915: 

Assets $60,321,343.04 

Deposits 57,362,899.35 

Capital actually paid up in 

cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve & Contingent Funds 1,958,443.69 

Employees' Pension Fund 199,164.12 

Number of Depositors 66,965 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week, with all modern 
conveniences. Free Hot and Cold Shower 
Bath on every floor. Elevator Service. 
AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front Street and Broadway, 
Opposite Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. Office 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



Phone Garfield 833 E. Benvenutl, Mgr. 

HOTEL FAIRFIELD 

250 Large Sunny Rooms Furnished Up- 
to-date. With all Latest Conveniences 
and Elevator Service. Rates: 25, 30 and 
50 cts per Day. $1.25 per Week and Up. 
Free Baths — Large Reading Room 
1325 STOCKTON STREET 
Near Broadway San Francisco, Cal. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Fair Prices. Reliable Good*. 

50 East Street, 

San Francisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopes 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN ® NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Cigars and Tobacco 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



JORTALLBROS.EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 

206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Fred Marjama, a native of Russia, 
age 36, has not been heard from since 
1908, at Buffalo, N. Y. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify his brother, J. Marjama, 51 
South St., New York, N. Y. 9-1-15 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

CLASSY CLOTHIER 

HATTER AND FURNISHER 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

UNIFORMS 



Gold Braid and Gold Wreaths 
of All Descriptions 



Phone Douglas 1082 

139 EAST STREET - - - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Between Merchant and Washington 



^> m M ^"V T^ "W~~* Y~*% g> See that this label (in light 
^5|]V/|^||^£^'|^^^blue) appears on the box in 
-mm^m. w — -^^ » ' ^ ^^^ which you are served. 



_fSEnil80L_ 

Issued by AutWityof tne Ciga; Makers' International Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

(JhlJ flrttifirt. Tkt U» 0|vi nrtwd hthli *» tm tan mtt by t NBUKS Ml 
l IMtUtOf THE OM MMf n MIITUIIUTIOWL WHO* tt AiMnci. M Mtini»K» devoted to the ad 
Wdcratnt o( tfcc MO WXATBtlUirvj INraiOIUAi \MIIAM Of TH£ OWTt Thtrtfan m f — 1 1 
tteM Cifljn to all snokm throuiitout t)w wo>W 

11 HrapaMi «■ tin Ubi <m b« pujutod acewfaj to lat 



FM 

»»• simile 



V C.Mtf.Vtf. 



J. MILLER 

124 EAST STREET Garfield 7690 

Union Store 

HATS, CAPS, 

FURNISHING GOODS, 

ETC. 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

•THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUrACTURCRS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 



BANK OF ITALY 



ALASKA FISHERMEN. 
San Francisco. 
Blom, J. Petterson, Carl 

Ekeland, Will Hj. Thorsen, Ole 
Hakansson, Ingvar Thorstensen, H. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



San Francisco 
San Jose 



Los Angeles 
San Mateo 



The Story of Our Growth 

As Shown by a Comparative 
Statement of Our Resources. 

December 31. 1904 J265.436.97 

December 31. 1905 $1,021,290 80 

December 31, 1906 $1,899,947.28 

December 31, 1907 $2,221,347.35 

December 31, 1908 $2,574,004.90 

December 31, 1909 $3,817,217.79 

December 31, 1910 $6,539,861.49 
December 31, 1911 $8,379,347.02 

December 31, 1912 $11,228,814.56 
December 31,1913 $15,882,911.61 

Dec. 31,1914, $18,030,401.58 

June30,1915,H9,080,264.20 

NUMBER OF DEPOSITORS, 53,946 



Samuel Dickson, a seaman, age 
about 40 years, son of Moffett Dick- 
son, deceased, of Belfast, Ireland, or 
any person knowing his whereabouts, 
is requested to communicate at once 
with the undersigned in connection 
with a legacy. A. R. Smith, U. S. 
Shipping Commissioner, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of John Burke, No. 2, a member of 
the Marine F. O. and Watertenders' 
Association of the Great Lakes, last 
heard of in Chicago, will please com- 
municate with Mrs. Julia Noonan, 
276 Twelfth street, Jersey City, N. J. 

William Walker, a native of Island- 
magee, Antrim Co., Ireland, is in- 
quired for by his nephew. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts kindly com- 
municate with John Walker, Geddis, 
7 Willowbank St., Brooklands, Win- 
nipeg, Manitoba, Canada. 

Edvin Nikolai Nielsen, a native of 
Kristiania, Norway, is requested to 
communicate with his sister Minni, 
who has important news from home. 
Address, Mrs. Minni Hall, Green 
Farm, Conn. 9-16-14 

Herman Sigfrid Persson, a native 
of Malmo, Sweden, supposed to be 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, who has 
not been heard of for two years, is 
inquired for by his brother, Gustav 
Persson. Address 13 Stenbarksgatan 
Malmo, Sweden. 7-28-15 

Vencelus Durbich is inquired for 
by his brother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please communicate with 
Gerolamo Durbich, Zurich, Switzer- 
land. 7-28-15 

John Dickson, who left Greenock, 
Scotland, about 10 years ago, his last 
address was Melrose House, Lower 
Boxhill, Brooklyn, New Zealand, is 
inquired for by his mother. Any- 
body knowing if he is alive or dead 
please notify the Secretary of the 
National Sailors' and Firemen's Un- 
ion, Greenock, Scotland. 



News from Abroad. 



During the last quarter of the 
year the expenditures of the French 
Government probably will run in 
excess of $13,000,000 a day. 

The municipal council of Gothen- 
burg (Sweden) having requested 
permission of the Royal Govern- 
ment to invest 1,000,000 crowns 
($268,000) in the Swedish-American 
Steamship Line, has been informed 
that the Royal Government has no 
objection to the plan. 

According to a recently published 
report the total absence of visitors 
to Switzerland this summer, as a 
result of the war, is being keenly 
felt by the inhabitants. In order to 
tide the country over the present 
crisis, the state is therefore consid- 
ering tlir advisability of advancing 
special loans. 

The whipping-post for habitual 
drunkards has been established in 
Australia. Sir John Madden, a Mel- 
bourne magistrate, recently sentenced 
a prisoner to four years' imprison- 
ment and to sixteen lashes besides. 
In passing sentence the magistrate 
remarked that the prisoner once be- 
fore endured flogging, but it seemed 
to have had no effect. 

The German Foreign Office has 
just issued in English a memorial 
against the employment of colored 
troops in the European theater of 
war by France and Great Britain on 
the ground that they have brought 
with them savage practices of war- 
fare of their native countries. The 
memorial charges the Africans and 
Hindus with murdering the wounded 
and mutilating the dead by cutting 
off their ears, which are worn in 
strings about their necks as neck- 
laces, and even severing the heads 
from bodies as war trophies. 

Disquieting reports from China 
foreshadowing a change of the gov- 
ernment from a republic to a mon- 
archy have appeared from time to 
time. General Li Yuen-Heng, vice- 
president, has resigned his office. 
Professor Frank J. Goodnow, legal 
adviser of President Yuan Shi-kai, 
has left Peking for the United States. 
Professor Goodnow is reported to 
have advised the change to a mon- 
archy in the interests of the coun- 
try. Dr. George Ernest Morrison, 
and other advisers are arguing 
against the change. It was an- 
nounced on the 6th that the gov- 
ernment had decided tentatively to 
maintain the form of a republic, but 
to make the presidency permanent 
and hereditary. 

A British prize court on Septem- 
ber 16 condemned the greater part 
of the American products forming 
the cargoes of four steamships. The 
products, valued at several million 
dollars, are declared forfeited to tin 
crown. The judgment was <leli> 
by Sir Samuel T. Evans, president 
of the court. It involves the car- 
goes of the Norwegian steamships 
"Kim," "Alfred Nobel," "Bjornst- 
jerne-Bjornson" and "Fridland." All 
iln foods on these vessels, consist- 
ing principally of American meat 
products, are confiscated, with the 
exception of a small proportion, 
« Inch the court released to claim 
ants. The case has been pending 
several months. The steamships 
' seized last November, and al- 
though efforts were made by the 
American owners to obtain an early 
trial, the British authorities have 
constantly delaj ed tin 1 hearing. 



16 



O -AST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the Wits. 



Mother's Joy. — "Won't your moth- 
er be mad when she sees how you 
your clothes?" 
"I puess not so very. Ma'll have 
of fun huntin' up cloth to 
match an' puttin' in a patch so peo- 
ple can hardly notice it." — Puck. 



Tactfully Planned.— Wife — Here 
are some household bills, dear, that 
came in to-day. 

Husband— Hang it! Why can't 
you wait until I've had my dinner? 

Wife — I was going to give you my 
own bills then. — Puck. 



Expensive Seance. — "I'm awfully 
sorr) that my engagements prevent 
my attending your charity conceit, 
but I shall be with you in spirit." 

"Splendid! And where would you 
like your spirit to sit? I have tick- 
ets here for half a guinea, a guinea, 
and thirty shillings." — Flieg 
Blatter. 



Wful Fate. — "If you are not in 
khaki by the 20th, I shall cut you 
dead," wrote a patriotic young Eng- 
lishwoman to her lover. The mili- 
tancy of it lost nothing in its trans- 
lation by a German correspondent 
of the Cologne Gazette: 

"If you are not in khaki by the 
20th I shall hack you to death (hacke 
ich dich zum Tode)."— Springfield 
Republican. 



Full Speed Ahead.— He was the 
-lowest boy on earth, and had been 
sacked at three places in two weeks, 
so tiis parents had apprenticed him 
to a naturalist. But even he found 
him slow. It took him two hours 
to give the canaries their seed, three 
to stick a pin through a dead but- 
terfly, and four to pick a convolvu- 
lus. The only point about him was 
that he was willing. 

"And what," he asked, having 

I a whole afternoon changing 

the goldfishes' water, "shall I do 

now, sir?" The naturalist ran his 

fingers through his locks. 

"Well, Robert," he replied at 
length, "I think you might now take 
the tortoise out for a run."— Chris- 
tian Register. 



Children's Accounts 

Your children should be taught to 

Open an account for each of 

them to-day. Show them by example 

that you believe in a savings account. 

They cannot start too soon. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 
House, San Francisco, Cal. 
THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equip- 
ped with all modern appliances to Illustrate 
and teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation in the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and Is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and Its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There Is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how igi.orant the seaman may be, even in the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and in a 
comparatively short interval of time. 






Upholding American 
PROSPERITY 



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FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXIX, No. 3. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1915. 



Whole No. 2349. 



LOCAL "OBJECTORS" ANSWERED. 



An Analysis of the Latest Attack Upon the Seamen's Act. 



The San Francisco Chamber of Commerce and 
the Shipowners' Association of the Pacific Coast 
have just made public their views on the Sea- 
men's Act, in a pamphlet "issued to confute 
persistent misrepresentations of their real de- 
sires, which are for amendment and not for re- 
peal of the bill." 

The statement opens with a blunt repudiation 
of the charge that the ship-owners and the com- 
mercial interests are "asking for the repeal of 
the Seamen's bill and are thus trying to force 
a condition of slavery upon sailors in our mer- 
chant marine and permit an inhuman treatment 
of them." 

This charge, we are assured, is far from the 
truth. 

The ship-owners and commercial interests 
have heretofore not considered it necessary to 
contradict such "false and misleading state- 
ments." 

"Now, however, it is desirable to declare ex- 
plicitly that it is not a repeal of the Seamen's 
bill which is requested, but the elimination by 
amendment of some of its objectionable fea- 
tures." 

Doubtless the public will welcome this dis- 
avowal by the ship-owners and commercial in- 
terests, the more readily on account of the ac- 
companying bill of exceptions. 

Now, for the first time, we have an authorita- 
tive statement of the objections to the Seamen's 
act, the grounds thereof, and the manner in 
which it is proposed to overcome them. 

Getting Down to Brass Tacks. 

To quote the statement itself: 

"In this connection, therefore, we desire to 
state plainly what portions of the bill we are 
content to leave in the law, and not affect by 
amendment, with our reasons therefor. To this 
end we make the following statement to the 
public: 

"There are twenty sections in the Seamen's 
bill. Of these twenty sections one is objected 
to in part and three are opposed in their en- 
tirety. To the balance of the bill no amend- 
ment whatever is sought." 

Thus it appears that the ship-owners and 
commercial interests are after all very modest 
in their requirements. How they must have 
suffered at the hands of their friends in the 
press and elsewhere, who have set the country 
by the ears by their denunciation of the "per- 
nicious Seamen's act" and the demand for an 
extra session of Congress to repeal that meas- 
ure, as the only means of "saving the last 
vestige of the American merchant marine." 

Of the twenty sections in the Seamen's act, 
the ship-owners and commercial interests are 
content — not entirely satisfied, be it noted; but 
content — with sixteen, one is objected to in part, 
and three arc "opposed in their entirety." 

Verily, the mountain has labored and brought 
forth a mouse. 

It will naturally be supposed that the three 
sections which are "opposed in their entirety" 
are open to serious criticism. Otherwise, of 
course, these magnanimous opponents of the 
Seamen's act" would surely have been content 
to leave them in the law, if for no other rea- 



son than to avoid any suspicion of invidious- 
ness. Let us examine these three sections. 

The first of the sections which are "opposed 
in their entirety" is known as Section 4 of the 
Seamen's act. This section provides that a 
seaman shall be entitled to receive one-half of 
his wages at every port during the voyage. 
"Desertions" and "Alcoholic Beverages." 

The objections to this section are that it is 
inserted "purely to encourage desertion"; that 
the seaman will be "tempted to drink large 
quantities of alcoholic beverages"; that he will 
by this fact be "unfitted for the proper per- 
formance of his duties," and thus may "not only 
endanger the safety of the ship and its cargo, 
but the lives of its passengers as well." 

No doubt these are very serious objections. 
The wonder is that they do not seem to have 
occurred to any one until the present time. 

Certainly these objections do not seem to 
have weighed with the Congress of the United 
States in its treatment of the subject during the 
past 125 years. 

It is of interest to note that the section under 
discussion, although part of the Seamen's act of 
1914, was originally enacted on July 20, 1790, by 
the first Congress of the United States. 

Anyone who cares to take the trouble to con- 
sult volume 1, Statutes at Large of the United 
State, page 133, will there find the section re- 
ferred to, practically word for word as it ap- 
pears in the Seamen's act. 

The section remained as originally enacted 
from 1790 to 1898, when it was amended by in- 
creasing the proportion of wages which the 
seaman was entitled to receive at every port 
during the voyage from one-third to one-half. 

The Seamen's act changes this feature of 
the law in only one respect. 

At the time of its enactment, in 1790, the 
law contained a proviso, as follows: "Provided 
the contrary be not expressly stipulated in the 
contract." This proviso was repeated in the 
amendment of 1898. The result may easily be 
imagined. Advantage was taken of the proviso 
to defeat the law itself. In common practice 
the stipulation, "No money in port except at 
master's option" was inserted in the shipping 
articles. Thus the purpose of the law was en- 
tirely destroyed. 

The Seamen's act repeats the terms of the 
old law, and, in place of the old proviso, de- 
clares that "all stipulations in the contract to 
the contrary shall be void." 

Law Was Enacted 125 Years Ago. 

In effect, therefore, the Seamen's act merely 
provides that the law, as it has stood on the 
statutes for 125 years, shall henceforth be put 
into force, instead of being "expressly stipulated 
to the contrary." 

Thus the ship-owners and commercial interests 
are in the position of objecting to this feature 
of the Seamen's act, not upon the ground that 
it is new legislation, but solely upon the ground 
that that measure makes an old law effective for 
the first time. 

Possibly the ship-owners and commercial in- 
terests are aware that the section in question 
was enacted long before the era of seamen's 
unions. 

Possibly they are aware that their objections 



are as old as the law itself. Possibly, on the 
other hand, their objection is inspired solely 
by the fact that now, after all these years, there 
is a good prospect that hereafter the law will 
mean in practice just what it means on paper. 
Possibly they feel that it makes little difference 
who writes the laws as long as they are per- 
mitted to write the provisos thereto! 

Referring to the objection that to give the 
seaman part of his earnings in port during the 
voyage will "encourage desertion," it may be 
remarked that the same objection has been 
made to every step taken toward the emancipa- 
tion of the seaman. It is further to be re- 
marked that these objections have in every in- 
stance been disproved by experience. 

The first step in this direction was taken in 
1895, when the Maguire Act abolished imprison- 
ment for desertion in the coastwise trade. That 
measure was followed, in 1898, by the passage 
of the White Act, which abolished imprison- 
ment for desertion in the ports of the United 
States, Canada, Mexico and other nearby for- 
eign countries. 

During the discussion of these measures Con- 
gress and the country were solemnly assured 
that their passage would spell ruin for the 
American merchant marine; that the seamen 
would desert in such large numbers that the 
vessels would be "left to rot in their neglected 
brine." 

Recalling Predictions of the Past. 

Let us see what has happened. The Com- 
missioner of Navigation, in his annual report 
for the year 1899, speaking of the White Act, 
passed during the previous year, said: 

"That Act is the most comprehensive measure 
ever passed in this country for the benefit of 
seamen. It is probably within bounds to as- 
sert that no parliamentary body ever before 
adopted legislation which has worked so radical 
a change in the historical relations between the 
seaman and the master and owner. 

. . . "The essential provision of that Act 
gives to the seamen the right to quit work in 
the domestic and near-by foreign trade (Canada, 
Mexico, etc.), subject to no penalties of conse- 
quence, except suit for breach of contrail, 
which, of course, will never be brought. . . . 

"The Act went into effect on February 20, 
1899, and too short a time has since elapsed 
to permit the formation of a correct judgment 
of its operations." 

Three years later (1902) the Commissioner of 
Navigation reported that the proposition of 
"failures to join" — practically the same as de- 
sertion — was about five per cent. To quote the 
language of the report: 

"The proposition of men who fail to join sail 
vessels in the foreign trade is less than 6 out 
of 100: in the coasting trade, about 4 oul of 
100. Since 1898 there has been virtually no 
penalty imposed on the seaman who fails to 
loin an American vessel in the United Si 

"Before that time he was subject to imprison- 
ment in jail until the vessel was ready to begin 
her voyage. Failures to join have not been 
returned until this year, and the Bureau has 
no figures bearing on former conditions." 

During the period since 1902 the facts as to 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



the number of "failures to join," or desertion, 
have been constantly noted by the officials at 
the respective seaports. The statistics thus 
compiled show that desertions have decreased 
from 4.29 per cent, in 1903, to 1.39 per cent, in 
1914. 

On this subject the report of the Commis- 
sioner of Navigation for 1914 says: 

''The percentage of seamen who desert from 
American vessels is relatively small, and de- 
sertion has ceased to be so considerable a 
factor in American shipping as it was in the 
days of sailing vessels. . . ." 

"The law providing for the arrest for deser- 
tion of seamen from American vessels in Eu- 
rope, Asia, Africa, Australia and South America 
is an empty form on the statute books, as the 
power bestowed is almost never invoked. 

"The repeal of the fragment of law left on 
the subject has been recommended for several 
years and that recommendation is renewed." 

Thus we find the facts are directly contrary 
to the predications of those who have opposed 
granting to the seaman the right of personal 
liberty enjoyed by every other class of men in 
the United States. The seaman, having been 
granted the right to quit, or "desert" has not 
deserted as frequently as he did when deser- 
tion was punishable by imprisonment. 

The reason of this fact is quite clear to 
anyone who understands the natural law in 
the case. Now that the seaman can not be 
held to the vessel by force, he is better treated, 
and therefore more contented, than before. The 
chief cause of desertion having been removed, 
the number of desertions has proportionately 
decreased. 

The payment to the seaman of part of his 
earnings in each port during the voyage will 
operate in the same way and by virtue of the 
same natural law. Perhaps the ship-owners 
and commercial interests are not to be blamed 
for their failure to understand natural laws, 
in view of thicr obvious unfamiliarity with 
the statutory laws. 

The Second Serious Objection. 

The second section which is "opposed in its 
entirety" is that known as Section 13, pro- 
viding that 75 per cent, of the crew in each 
department shall be able to understand any 
order given by the officers of the vessel. 

The objection in this instance is based upon 
the ground that the language test "is inserted 
actually for the purpose of preventing the em- 
ployment of Chinese and Japanese." 

In reality the language test is justified by 
the necessities of the case. In times of emer- 
gency every member of the crew must be able 
to render aid. 

The ability to understand the orders given 
by the officers is a prerequisite to efficient 
service. The statement of the ship-owners and 
commercial interests asserts that "the safety of 
the vessel is thoroughly assured if the crew can 
understand the orders of the petty officers (in- 
terpreters or 'No. 1 men'), through whom all 
commands are issued." 

It happens that this point has been judicially 
determined by no less an authority than the 
Supreme Court of the United States. In its 
decision in the case of the steamship "City of 
Rio de Janeiro," a Pacific Mail vessel wrecked 
in the Golden Gate in 1901 with the loss of 
131 lives; the Court held that the Chinese crew 
of the vessel did not constitute a sufficient 
crew for the sole reason that they could not 
understand the orders given by the officers, but 
were obliged to depend upon petty officers or 
interpreters. 

The language test in the Seamen's act is ex- 
actly in line with the decision of the Supreme 
Court. That provision is the more necessary, 
for the reason that the original provision for 
life-boats for all and two able-seamen for each 
life-boat was reduced at the instance of the 
ship-owners to life-boats for from 20 to 75 per 
cent, of those on board and a licensed officer 
or one able-seaman for each life-boat, the re- 
mainder of the life-boat crews to be composed 
of "certificated life-boat men," i. e., men drawn 
from other departments of the vessel. 

Surely the very least of the qualifications re- 
quired of these men is that they shall be able 
to understand the orders given by the officers 
in charge of the life-boat. 

Efficient Seamen Not Wanted. 

Certain other features of this section are ob- 
jected to, notably the requirement that a stated 
proportion of the deck crew (able seamen) shall 
possess certain qualifications of age and experi- 
ence. 

This feature, by the way, merely follows the 
laws of other maritime nations. It is designed 
chiefly to insure that vessels shall be manned 
to some extent by practical seamen, instead of 
being manned entirely by landsmen, as now 
frequently happens. 

The third section which is "opposed in its 
entirety" is that known as Section 16, providing 
for the abrogation of so much of the treaties 
with other nations as may be in conflict with 
the provisions of the Seamen's act. 

This section, we arc informed, "will certainly 
cause friction and may produce retaliation, and, 
if enforced, will probably result in many foreign 
lines refusing to come to our ports." 

The provision for the abrogation of treaties 
has but one purpose, or, rather, a dual purpose. 
The treaties now require the authorities of the 
1'nited States to arrest seamen who leave for- 
eign vessels in our ports. The power thus 



given the masters of foreign vessels to hold 
their seamen, enables them to maintain in our 
ports the advantage gained by the shipment of 
seamen in foreign ports at rates of wages much 
lower than those prevailing in the United 
States. 

This "difference in the cost of operation" has 
long been a grievance on the part of the Amer- 
ican ship-owner. The only remedy heretofore 
proposed for this condition has been that of 
paying subsidies. In this instance the ship- 
's and commercial interests object to a 
ly which by invoking the play of natural 
law will accomplish the removal of a grievance 
which they have themselves sought to remove 
by artificial and unnatural methods. 

Coming now to the section which is "ob- 
jected to in part," we find the objection to be 
directed against Section 11(e). This section 
provides that the law prohibiting the payment 
of advance and allotment from the wages of 
seamen at the time of their engagement shall 
apply to all foreign vessels, as well as to all 
■ rican vessels, in American ports. 

"This," we are told, "is entirely wrong, as 
the United States has no right to dictate to 
foreign nations what rules they shall adopt 
in advancing money to their men in their own 
country, and. with proper respect for the comity 
of nations, there is no power which should en- 
force such a regulation." 

The "Comity of Nations." 

Unfortunately for the "comity of nations," 
the provision in question has been part of the 
navigation laws of the United States for over 
thirty years. The section referred to was 
originally enacted in 1884. It was re-enacted 
in substantially the same terms in 1886 and 
1898. Moreover, the "right of the United States 
to dictate to foreign nations" has been upheld 
by the courts every time the matter has come 
before them. 

The last instance of the kind is that known 
"Eudora" case, decided by the Supreme 
Court of the United States June 1, 1903. 

The decision is interesting as a clear state- 
ment of the principles upon which the laws of 
a given country may be applied to seamen on 
foreign vessels. In its decision the Court said: 

"It follows from these decisions that it is 
within the power, of Congress to prescribe the 
penal provisions of Section 10 (Act, Dec. 21, 
1898), and no one within the jurisdiction of 
the United States can escape liability for a 
violation of those provisions on the plea that 
he is a foreign citizen or an officer of a for- 
eign merchant vessel. It also follows that it 
is a duty of the courts of the United States to 
give full force and effect to such provisions. 

"It is not pretended that this Government can 
control the action of foreign tribunals. 

"In any case presented to them they will be 
guided by their own views of the law and its 
scope and effect, but the courts of the United 
States are bound to accept this legislation and 
enforce it whenever its provisions are violated. 

"The implied consent of this Government 
to leave jurisdiction over the internal affairs 
of foreign merchant vessels in our harbors to 
the nations to which those vessels belong may 
be withdrawn. Indeed, the implied consent to 
permit them to enter our harbors may be with- 
drawn, and if this implied consent may be 
wholly withdrawn it may be extended upon 
such terms and conditions as the Government 
sees fit to impose. 

"And this legislation, as plainly as words can 
make it, imposes these conditions upon the 
shipment of sailors in our harbors, and declares 
that they are applicable to foreign as well as to 
domestic vessels. Congress has thus prescribed 
conditions which attend the entrance of foreign 
vessels into our ports, and those conditions the 
courts are not at liberty to dispense with. The 
interests of your own shipping require this. 

"We are of the opinion that it is within the 
power of Congress to protect all sailors ship- 
ping in our ports on vessels engaged in foreign 
or interstate commerce, whether they belong to 
citizens of this country or of a foreign nation, 
and that our courts are bound to enforce those 
provisions in respect to foreign equally with 
domestic vessels." 

A Summary of the Objections. 

To sum up, of the four objections raised by 
the ship-owners and commercial interests, two 
are directed against long-existing features of 
the Navigation Laws, supported by argument 
that is either in itself baseless or directly con- 
trary to the judgment of the highest authori- 
ties. Of the remaining two objections, one is 
upon grounds that have been denied by 
the Supreme Court of the United States, and 
the other upon grounds which are in direct 
conflict with the ship-o.wners' own arguments, 
made in other connections. 

Now that the ship-owners and commercial in- 
ts have reduced their opposition to the 
Seamen's act to these four points, it would seem 
thai they might well go a little further and 
admit that they have no real objection to the 
Seamen's act. 

If they must find some kind of objection to 
the Seamen's act it may not be amiss to suggest 
that they try to pick a flaw among those fea- 
tures of the act that are new and thus avoid 
the embarrassment of attacking the time-hon- 
ored institutions of the country which, of 
course, the ship-owners and commercial inter- 
ests had no idea of doing. 



CHAMBERLAIN CORRECTS DOLLAR. 

(New York Marine News.) 



The most advertised American ship- 
owner, Captain Robert M. Dollar, of San 
Francisco, holds the center of the lime- 
light on matters maritime against all 
would-be competitors. He, perhaps more 
than any other individual, convinced Con- 
gress and the Administration that, if aliens 
were permitted to command and officer 
American vessels — alien crews already be- 
ing permitted on American vessels under 
our laws — American ships could be run as 
cheaply as foreign ships are run. He 
knew, or he should have known, that alien 
crews demanded, and obtained, American 
rates of pay as soon as they "signed on" a 
ship under the American flag; and why 
Capt. Dollar should think, therefore, that 
alien masters and officers would accept 
alien rates of pay under the American flag, 
we have no idea. 

Capt. Dollar first raised the point of the 
difference in net tonnage as fixed by Amer- 
ican and by British laws, and as to one 
or two of his own ships he was able to 
show a remarkable degree of disparity un- 
favorable to the American ship, consid- 
ering that net tonnage is the basis of port 
charges to a considerable extent. Capt. 
Dollar has rung the changes on this in- 
vidious distinction without stint. It is but 
proper to say that the difference is of con- 
sequence only in what are called "shelter- 
deck"' vessels, our laws measuring the shel- 
ter deck spaces and including them in net 
tonnage, spaces that British laws exclude 
from net tonnage measurement. 

Recently in a carefully (?) prepared ar- 
ticle in the "New York Journal of Com- 
merce" Capt. Dollar again delivered him- 
self of his net-tonnage discrimination su- 
perlatives, and called down upon himself 
the following gentle but effective rebuke 
in a letter from Commissioner of Naviga- 
tion Chamberlain, of the Department of 
Commerce : 

"I am somewhat surprised, after our sev- 
eral conversations on the subject, to read 
in to-day's Xew York 'Journal of Commerce' 
that part of your criticism of the naviga- 
tion laws which deals with measurement of 
Is. You know that the sole factor in 
our regulations which may be regarded as 
adverse to shipping, as compared with the 
British Board of Trade rules has been the 
treatment of so-called 'shelter-decks' on 
cargo boats. 

"On August 28, 1914, I asked Collectors 
of Customs to report any American steam- 
ers in foreign trade with shelter decks 
which might have less tonnage under the 
Board of Trade rules than under ours. 
None were reported, because we both know 
our owners and builders have preferred 
ships of the American-Hawaiian line type. 

"< In September 5, 1914, I again advised 
collectors to notify the owner of any sea- 
going American steamer that he could 
apply for a revision of measurement on 
the ground that sheltered spaces with open- 
ings at the sides or ends had been in- 
cluded in the tonnage. Again, there were 
no applications. On March 16, 1915, re- 
vised regulations on shelter decks were is- 
sued, and again there has been no request 
for remeasurement. Still a fourth time, on 
July 15, 1915, collectors were asked to 
bring the subject to the attention of Amer- 
ican ship-owners, and as yet there has 
been no reply." 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Canadian Labor Law Put to Severe Test. 

The Industrial Disputes Investigation 
Act, passed by the Dominion Government 
to prevent and to adjust labor disputes, is 
being severely tested in this city in the case 
of the Vancouver Electrical Workers' Union 
versus the British Columbia Electric Rail- 
way Company. 

The law applies to public-service corpora- 
tions, and provides that the Government shall, 
together with each of the parties to a dispute, 
appoint one member to a board of concilia- 
tion and investigation. The law further pro- 
vides that neither side shall declare a strike 
or cause a lockout during the reference of 
such dispute. 

Under this law the electrical workers asked 
for the appointment of a commission to in- 
vestigate the railway company's demand for 
a reduction of wages and working conditions. 
The Government appointed its representative 
and notified the company to take similar ac- 
tion. This request was ignored and the Gov- 
ernment appointed a member to represent the 
company. During these proceedings several 
electrical workers were discharged and the 
union began action against the company in 
the Vancouver police court on the ground 
that the discharges violated that section of 
the law which prohibited acts amounting to 
a lockout. They further charged the com- 
pany with attempting to weaken the union. 

When the case came to trial the judge dis- 
missed the company and said he could "find 
no direct evidence of a lockout." The court 
refused to go into the matter at length. He 
said "an investigation is pending," and he 
did not want to interfere "to too great an ex- 
tent in the internal affairs of the company." 

The company now refuses to recognize the 
Government-appointed board, on the ground 
that the workers' representative made com- 
plaint against it in the police court. This 
may result in more litigation while the com- 
pany is privileged to discharge active unionists. 



Chicago Girls Win Strike. 

Over 1,000 Chicago girl strikers returned 
to work at the Herzog factories, after a 
week's idleness. 

The girls are employed on canvas gloves 
and ladies' garments. Three hundred glove 
workers struck first and they were quickly 
followed by nearly 700 garment workers 
and milliners, suspender workers and em- 
ployes in the shipping room. 

The agreement calls for a 10 per cent, 
increase in wages of all garment workers 
earning less than $8.50 a week. Fines are 
abolished and glove workers will not be 
charged for needles. The firm agrees to 
recognize the union and give preference to 
unionists when employing workers. An 
arbitration system is agreed to and a wage 
board is established. Decisions are to be 
retroactive and will date from the day the 
workers returned to work. 

The Women's Trade-Union League made 
arrangements for securing bail for girls 
arrested while on picket duty. Mrs. Ray- 
mond Robins, president of the League, said : 

"The girls are a mixture of races and 
the numerous tongues show the work nec- 
essary for our trade-unions. The great ma- 
jority of the strikers were Russian Jews, 
the Poles were second in number, followed 



by Italians, and then the American-speak- 
ing girls. These workers are exceedingly 
young girls and will need the continued 
attention of several women organizers for 
the coming year, furnished by the Glove 
Workers and Ladies' Garment Workers' 
unions and the Women's Trade-Union 
League." 

The girls were also assisted by A. F. of 
L. Organizers Fitzpatrick and Flood, Sec- 
retary Nockels of the local Federation of 
Labor, and other unionists. 



Longshoremen Report Gains. 

General Organizer Hugh Frayne reports 
that the International Longshoremen's As- 
sociation, through President O'Connor, has 
secured the first agreement that has ever 
been made with any of the steamship 
agents or the stevedores in the port of 
New York City. They have succeeded in 
writing union shop agreements with prac- 
tically every one of the employing long- 
shoremen in the port of New York and as 
a result, 3,000 additional members have 
been taken into the locals of the Interna- 
tional Longshoremen's Association. One 
of the oldest independent longshoremen's 
organizations has gone out of existence 
and affiliated its members with the Inter- 
national. Conditions in the agreement call 
for 35 cents per hour, day work; 50 cents 
per hour, night work ; 50 cents per hour 
for ordinary holidays and 60 cents per 
hour for Sundays, Christmas Day and 
Fourth of July. When Longshoremen are 
required to work on Good Friday on the 
Jersey shore, 60 cents per hour will be the 
rate. Double time will be paid for men 
handling explosives and munitions of war. 
Standard methods of voluntary arbitration 
were included in the agreement for the 
settling of minor grievances that may arise. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



Unionism Makes Progress. 

"Here is an exhibition of making prog- 
ress through our trade union activity in 
spite of the Legislature," says A. F. of L. 
Organizer Fitzpatrick, of Chicago, in a let- 
ter to Secretary Morrison on the recent 
gains of hospital attendants' and nurses' 
unions employed in Illinois State institu- 
tions. 

The Chicago unionist writes : 

"About a year and a half ago we started 
to organize the employes in the State insti- 
tutions. At that time the conditions of em- 
ployment had remained unchanged for thirty 
years. The employes lived in the hope 
that the politicians, the Legislature and 
then, later on, the civil service law, would 
protect their interests, but at last they had 
to turn to the labor movement for relief. 
These employes worked twelve, fourteen 
and sixteen hours per day. The minimum 
wage for women was $20 per month and 
$25 for men. The maximum was $30 
and $35. 

"One of our first moves was to change 
these conditions, and after some effort we 
succeeded in inducing the State Board of 
Administration to establish the eight-hour 
day in all institutions under their control. 
This was accomplished without any reduc- 
tion in the rate of wages. Then we were 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



International Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, Lon- 
don, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers. 4 Spekeland Bldgs., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts Maritimes de France, 33 rue Grange aux- 
Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 
NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade 15, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
lenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 
ITALY. 
Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S, Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 
Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 
SPAIN. 
Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocincros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 
Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calle Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 
Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandores, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 18, Rio de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas. Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo dos Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 
Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
laring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World's WorKers. 



Birmingham (England) has aban- 
doned the proposal to employ women 
as 'bus and tramcar conductors, as 
the men refused to either teach the 
women their duties or to move ve- 
hicles where they were engaged. The 
committee then decided to employ 
youths under 18 years and men over 
military age. 

At a recent meeting of the Bris- 
bane (Queensland) Progressive Car- 
penters' Society it was resolved that 
the same conditions and privileges 
be obtained for all employes in the 
building trade, which are at present 
allowed to leading hands and fore- 
men only — namely, payment or pro- 
vide work for all who attend work 
on wet days, etc., — the same to be 
brought before the other unions 
through the Industrial Council. 

One of the consequences of the 
war is that the birth rate has de- 
creased in England and the infant 
death rate increased. In Greater 
London the number of births every 
week is between 400 and 500 below 
the respective averages in the cor- 
responding weeks of the past five 
years, allowing for the growth in 
the population. Children have been 
dying in London at the rate of 200 
a week in excess of the number 
dying at the corresponding time last 
year. The returns from 95 other 
towns in England and Wales show 
that the increased mortality among 
children is general throughout the 
country. Many of these deaths are 
said to be due to the scarcity of doc- 
tors and nurses. 

The general in command of the 
Twentieth German army corps, Frei- 
hcrr von Schlieffen, has issued a de- 
cree forbidding agricultural laborers 
and farm servants in the district 
under his command to leave their situ- 
ations without legal cause before the 
expiration of their contract. A 
change of residence before the ex- 
piration of such contracts is only to 
be permissible if the consent of the 
authorities has first been obtained, 
and in that case a form of dismissal 
is to be provided by the employer. 
Kmployers, in turn, are forbidden to 
engage laborers who fail to produce 
such a form, and are liable to im- 
prisonment if they dismiss their 
employes without legal cause, or 
compel the latter to leave by illegal 
treatment. The VorwartS noted with 
satisfaction that the present instance 
was the first time that the latter 
prpvision with regard to employers 
had been included in decrees of that 
kind. 

Mi ■tor drivers and engineers are 
now the best paid "mechanics" in 
the world. At least it is so in Eng- 
land, where, an account says, "in 
ordinary times the chauffeur lived a 
discontented life on £4 a week. Now 
he averages from £10 to £20, ac- 
cording to his district. He is still 
cursing his lot. An acquaintance of 
mine who used to strafe a type- 
writer for £2 a week got sacked on 
account of the bad times. He spent 
a whole month refusing food and 
drink until someone advised him to 
hire or buy a second-hand car. He 
acquired one for £80 and started 
on a roving commission in and about 
the military camps. In the first 
month he cleared the price of the 
machine and a bit over. This month 
he has bought car number two and 
found his other unemployed brother 
a job as driver. They are coining 
money." Some car owners plying to 
and from Enoggera camp are said to 
be netting £10 to £12 a week. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. B. CANNON 



CANNON a BLAIZE 



A. E. BLAIZE 



Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 
515 FRONT-516 BEACON STS. .... SAN PEDRO 

"WHEN IT COMES TO GOOD CLOTHES" 

Tailored to FIT YOU, in a UNION SHOP 

It will be to your interest to call on 



S. G. SWANSON 



641 SOUTH BEACON STREET, next door to Postofnce 
Established 1904, at the Los Angeles "Waterfront" SAN PEDRO, CALIFORNIA 



San Pedro News Co. 

Sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agent* 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



Mills, Elbert S Nash 

SIXTH AND BEACON STREETS 

FIFTH AND BEACON STREETS 

— Dealers In — 

EDGEWORTH TOBACCO AND 

UNION LABEL CIGARS 



GIVE US A TRIAL 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

The members of the crew of the 
barkentine "Mary Winkelman" who 
made the voyage in her to Mollendo, 
Peru, and arrived at San Francisco 
on her return trip on April 5, 1914, 
are wanted by the Charles Nelson 
Co., at San Francisco, Cal. — 6-24-14 

John Erik Nordberg, a native of 
Sweden, age about 26, supposed to 
be sailing on the Pacific Coast, is 
inquired for by his brother Harold, 
care of Sailors' Union of the Pa- 
cific, San Francisco. 

Oscar Olsen, age 37, a native of 
Hallerna, near Gothenborg, Sweden, 
who was sailing on the Great Lakes 
about three years ago, is inquired 
for by John V. Olsen, Sun Com- 
pany, Marcus Hook, Pa. 5-26-15 

Adolph Godfred Eriksen, born in 
Moss, Norway, is inquired for by 
his brother, Herman Eriksen. Any 
one knowing his whereabouts please 
notify W. Nielsen, 206 Moravian St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 5-26-15 



M. BROWN and SONS 

have moved to 

109 SIXTH STREET 

Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Edgar Duncan Stewart, age 22 
years, white, born in Massachusetts, 
who, on October 9, 1912, was 
shipped as seaman on the American 
steamship "Toledo," at Marcus Hook. 
Pa., for a voyage to Sabine, Texas, 
but who did not join the vessel the 
next day, and has not since been 
heard from. The undersigned will 
highly appreciate your kind co-oper- 
ation: Augustine R. Smith, United 
States Shipping Commissioner, or 
Shipping Commissioner, Appraisers 
Building, San Francisco. 5-13-14 

Nils Edmund Johansen, a native of 
Tonsberg, Norway, age about 50, 
last heard of at Melbourne, Austra- 
lia, is inquired for by his brother. 
Address, Martin Johansen, 839 Cen- 
tennial avenue, Alameda, Cal. 

Eugene Martin, age 25, 6 feet tall, 
gray eyes, is inquired for by his 
mother. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify Mrs. Rose T. 
Martin, 4231 15 N. E., Seattle, 
Wash. 1-27-1915 

Chas. Maywell, a sailor, last heard 
of in New York City in 1892, is en- 
quired for by his son; anyone know- 
ing his whereabouts please notify 
William J. Maywell, 426 West 59th 
street, New York City, N. Y.— 12-23-14 



San Pedro Letter List. 



Anderson, Emanuel Lindeberg, I 
Anderson, Edw. Latz, Koi 

-1739 Lundstedt, Chris, 

son, John -li»68Lutzen. Vaidemar 
Anderson, Martin Lalan, Joe 



-1894 
Anderson, Sven. 

(Reg. Letter.) 
Anderson, Oscar 
Anderson, Ernest 
Andersson, Enkan 
Apelquist, Otto 
r, Arthur 
Bergh, Borge 
Buanlk, L. 
Brein, Hans 
Benson. Ray 
Bergman, Leo 
Benrowitz. Felix 
Carera. Pete 
1 lahlgren, Pete 
William 
William 
son, Otto 
Eklund, Sven 
Fisher, Wm. 
Hansen, Oskar 
Hansen, Charly 
Hansen, M. 

tl, Hilmar 
Hecker, William 
Hannus, Alex. 

H. -1565 
Johansson, Victor 
•Tolianson, T. 

-1219 



Lindsberg, C. 
Larsen, L. K. 
Lindholm, A. 
Matson, Johan 
Mikalsen. AndP 
.Malm. Quel 
McGulre, J. 
Mesak, E. 
Martinson, 1 
Nyhagen, Julius 
Xulir, Niels 
Olsen. John 
Olsen, Ludvig 
Olsen, Olai 
i nven. Fred 
Ophaug, Wilhelm 
i Hin. Bmll 
Penningrud. Ludvlk 
Peterson. Huns. 

-1064 
Peterson, X. 

•on, Otto 
i - r. 
Philips. Chs 
Richardson, A. 
Parsons, olaf 
A. 

Renvall, Anaheim 
Smith, Law i 
Sutse, Mikhail 
riders, Charles 
Geo. W. Stromsberg. Ivar 
Se^ - il z 



Johanson, Geo. Sievei s, G P, 

on, Bdvard A. Tamlsar, P. 



Johansen. Ch:is. 



Toren, G-ustaf A, 
Uhlig, Richard 



\. Verney, M. O. 



Johnson, Gus. 

Johnson. K. II. 
Kalnin, Ed. 



Verdonk, Peter 
Warkkala, John 
Packages. 

Johnson, K. II. 



Honolulu, H. T. 



Anderson, John E. 
Burk. Harry -1284 
Crantly, C. W. 
Eugenio, John 
Ekelund, Rickhard 
Ivertsen, Slgvald B 
Lengwenus, W. L. 
Moller, F. 



Nelsen, C. F. 
Petersen, Carl 
Peters, Walter 
Reither, Fritz 
Solberg. B. P. 
Strand, Conrad 
Thompson, Emll N. 



A SAILORS BANK. 

With Branches Throughout the World 

In the Philippines, Japan, China, Straits Settlements, India, 
London, Mexico and Panama, the 

INTERNATIONAL BANKING CORPORATION 

is particularly well equipped to give service to 

SEA- FARING MEN 

IN THE 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 
of its San Francisco Branch 

it gives "Personal Service" and courteous treatment to all its 

customers. Four per cent, per annum is paid on Savings 

Deposits, computed semi-annually. 

In 1910 it purchased and took over the business of the 

SWEDISH AMERICAN BANK 

and for the accommodation of its Scandinavian customers, 
the bank carries on hand at all times an ample supply of 
Swedish, Norwegian and Danish 5Kr. and lOKr. bank notes. 

Sailors' Accounts are Especially Welcomed 

Head Office— 60 Wall Street, New York 

Resources over $40,000,000 

MILLS BUILDING :: BUSH and MONTGOMERY STREETS 

Uptown Branch, Geary and Fillmore Streets 

Open Saturday Evenings, 6 to I 

E. W. WILSON, Manager 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Daniel William Thorin is inquired 
for by his mother. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify Fru 
Thorin, Hegagata 7, Gothenborg, 
Sweden. 9-23-14 

Carl Fritjof Johansson Lind, age 
39, a native of Sonderborg, Germany, 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, is in- 
quired for by his brother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify John Lind, 1401 West 9th St., 
Cleveland. Ohio.— 3-24-15. 

Frederick Wood, a seaman, sailing 
on the Pacific Coast, is inquired for 
by his sister, Miss Lucy Wood, 10k 
Broughan street, Darlinghurst, Syd- 
ney, N. S. W., Australia. He is de- 
scribed to be tall, with dark curly 
hair and carries a scar on the nose. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
kindly notify the office of Chief of 
Police, San Francisco, Cal. — 6-24-14. 

Waldemar Stintman, alias Broth, 
a native of Russia, age 21, supposed 
to be sailing on the Pacific Coast. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify his brother, John Stint- 
man, address Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific. San Francisco. 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Magnus Magnussen, a native of 
Soderhamn, Sweden, should at once 
communicate with F. A. Smith, Box 
770. Aberdeen, Wash. 9-23-14 

Martin Nielsen, a native of Den- 
mark, member of the Sailors' Union 
on the Pacific for the last 8 years, 
has not been heard of since July. 
1912. Mis address then was Sailors' 
Union, Seattle, Wash. Any one 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify George Leonhard, Sailors' Union, 
59 Clay St.— 8-11-1915. 

Olai Ingebrigtsen (Brock), a na- 
tive of Norway, last heard from 13 
years ago, when leaving San Fran- 
cisco for Australia on the American 
bark "Golden Gate," is inquired for 
by his brother. Any information re- 
garding the above named will be 
gladlv received bv Niels Ingebrigtsen, 
469^49th street, Brooklyn, N. Y.; or 
Sam Andersen, 100 Steuart street, San 
Francisco, Cal. — 8-4-15. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



Towage service at the mouth of the Columbia 
will be placed on the same plan October 1 as 
prevailed when the shipping season last year was 
at its height. The rebuilt bar tug "Wallula" 
will assist the "Oneonta" in handling vessels 
over the bar. 

The tug "Hercules" has started on the long 
tow from San Pedro to Jacksonville, Fla., with 
the dredge "San Pedro," belonging to the 
Standard American Dredge Company. The tow- 
ing will cost the dredging company $12,000, 
but, having lost several dredges in the Galveston 
storm, the company has no other machine 
available for the Florida contract. 

The new publication, North Pacific Ports, 
compiled by the Terminal Publishing Company 
of Seattle, has put into compact form 420 pages 
of valuable information for all persons inter- 
ested in shipping affairs. The book is just from 
the press and contains much information which 
is invaluable and which has never been put 
forth in a more compact form. Twelve pages 
are devoted to San Francisco. In these pages 
are given the pilotage and harbor regulations, 
rates of dockage, depth of water, quarantine 
regulations, etc. 

Wholesale fines were imposed and recom- 
mended to the Portland officers of the Govern- 
ment custom-house by Inspector H. F. McGrath 
and Collector H. J. Kimball of Marshfield., Ore. 
The violators are passenger boats on Coos Bay, 
which are alleged to have disregarded regula- 
tions on equipment. Inspector McGrath is now 
at Gardiner, on the Umpqua River, where it is 
expected further violations will be discovered. 
Florence, Mapleton and Acme, on the Siuslaw 
River, will likewise come under the investiga- 
tion, which is a result of a recent Government 
order respecting all passenger craft. 

It is reported that owing to many new ship- 
building contracts received recently, the Seattle 
Construction and Drydock Company will in- 
crease its force of workmen by 1,500 mechanics 
and other skilled labor within the next thirty 
days. This is above the average working force 
the plant has employed for some time past. 
Shipbuilding at all yards throughout the coun- 
try is reported to be going ahead at high speed. 
A late report of the Department of Commerce 
shows that on July 1 there were 125 vessels 
building in the yards of the United States out- 
side of naval construction work. Of this 
number, 65 were steel ships, aggregating 298,- 
426 tons, and 60 were wooden vessels, totaling 
288,701 tons. 

A big deal is reported by the "Japan Mail" 
between the Hokkaido Tanko Kisen Kaisha and 
the Interisland S. N. Co. at Honolulu for the 
supply of 130,000 tons of Yubari coal. The first 
shipment has just been made. This is the first 
big export of Japanese coal to Hawaii, which 
lias heretofore bought Australian .coal. The 
"Japan Chronicle" of July 30 states that Japanese 
collieries have curtailed their output by over 
20 per cent, this year as compared with last. 
In spite of this stocks are increasing. Accord- 
ing to the latest investigations quoted by the 
Mainichi of Osaka, stocks of the collieries 
amount to 546,000 tons, and those on the Moji 
and Wakamatsu markets to 738,000 tons, totaling 
1,284,000 tons. When small stocks in other 
parts of the country are taken into account, 
the grand total will exceed the unprecedented 
figure of 1,300,000 tons. 

The oldest ship in the United States Navy, 
the historic frigate "Independence," met an in- 
glorious end during the past week on the mud 
flats at Hunter's Point, San Francisco She was 
burned for the copper rivets in her stanch old 
hull. As the flames leaped into the sky, mark- 
ing the passing of the venerable warship that 
had flown the Stars and Stripes since 1812, a 
small panic swept through the cities around 
the Bay. Some thought it was a fire in the 
manufacturing district of South San Francisco; 
others feared that a ferryboat had met disaster. 
It proved to be only the funeral pyre of the 
vessel, once the pride of Uncle Sam's fighting 
sailors. For $3515 the old "Independence" was 
sold by the Navy Department to the commer- 
cial company that coveted the metal in its brave 
hulk. The keel of the "Independence" was laid 
at Boston in 1812 and the ship was launched 
July 20, 1814. 

Vilhjalmur Stefansson, the Canadian explorer, 
who was long unheard from in the Arctic, has 
discovered a new land in the north and accom- 
plished practically every purpose for which his 
journey was undertaken, according to word 
brought to Nome by the power schooner 
"Ruby," from Hcrschcl Island. Mr. Stefansson, 
with two companions, Storker Storkersen and 
Ole Anderson, set out from Martin Point, 
Alaska, March 22, 1914, over the polar ocean 
to search for supposed new lands in the Beau- 
fort Sea. Captain S. F. Cottle, master of the 
"Ruby," says that Mr. Stefansson is on Banks 
Land, cast of the Mackenzie, outfitting for 
continuance of the explorations to the west- 
ward to ascertain the full extent of the new 
land he has discovered southwest of Prince 
Patrick's Island. Mr. Stefansson discovered a 
continuance of the continental shelf several de- 
grees west of Banks Land and even determined 
its southern limits, but was unable to continue 



his explorations to the north and west. It is 
the intention of Mr. Stefansson to establish a 
base on Banks Land and continue his explora- 
tion from that point. The time of the return 
of the expedition cannot be foretold, as Mr. 
Stefansson intends to continue until he has fully 
ascertained the limits of the new land he has 
discovered. 

A rate war between the steamship companies 
plying between San Francisco and the Mexican, 
Central American and Canal Zone ports is 
looming large on the shipping horizon. It has 
been brought about through the announcement 
from the Pacific Mail Company that freight 
rates to all ports of call along the west coast 
have been cut to $5 per ton, on all commodi- 
ties and to all ports. This is a reduction from 
the average rate formerly in force of $8 per ton, 
but which on some shipments has been as high 
as $12 per ton. A. J. Frey, assistant general 
manager of the Pacific Mail Company, con- 
firmed the reported cut in the company's rate. 
"It is necessary on account of present condi- 
tions along the west coast," he said. "The rate 
will be maintained until the coffee season sets 
in, when the people along the coast will have 
more money and then the rates probably will 
be restored to the present schedule. The cut is 
only a temporary affair, and first affects ship- 
ments of the 'City of Para.'" _F. M. Stark, 
general manager of the California South Sea 
Navigation Company, which operates the steam- 
ers "O. M. Clark," "Coaster" and "Fort Bragg" 
to Mexico and Central America, is strong in 
his denunciation of the rate cut inaugurated by 
the Mail Company. He has written to other 
companies operating to Mexico and to shippers 
here stating that his company will not cut the 
present average rate of $8, and calling upon the 
steamship men to maintain the present rate. 

Queerest of all craft which have entered San 
Francisco harbor for many months is the 
Dutch dredging steamer "Ingenieur Sacharow," 
Captain Metus, which arrived during the past 
week, sixty-two days from Rotterdam. In spite 
of passing twice through the English channel — 
for her machinery broke down and she had 
to put back to Holland — the little craft saw no 
submarines and was not molested. The "Sacha- 
row" is one of three dredges built in Holland 
for work in the harbor of Vladivostok, and 
with the other two craft is to be delivered to 
the Russian Government there. The others, 
having a larger coal capacity than this one, 
made the trip from the Canal straight to Hono- 
lulu for fuel, but the "Sacharow" came here to 
replenish her bunkers. According to Captain 
Metus, his vessel will remain in San Fran- 
cisco until the big tug "Friesland" arrives from 
the East Indies as a convoy to the Siberian 
port. Just when this will be he does not know; 
and the latest marine records here show that 
the "Friesland" arrived at Singapore from 
Shanghai, May 4. The entire trip of the dredg- 
ing steamer from Holland was made without 
incident. No rough weather was encountered. 
With the other two vessels, the "Sacharow" 
is declared to be the latest development in 
dredgers and is known as a steam hopper ves- 
sel. These craft are used extensively in Hol- 
land for dredging the canals, and for port work 
on the Siberian coast are declared to be with- 
out equal. 

The California South Seas Navigation Com- 
pany of San Francisco has increased its fleet of 
vessels by the addition of the steamer "O. M. 
Clark." This steamer was formerly under char- 
ter by the Olson-Mahony Company and has 
been engaged in the Mexican trade. Under its 
new owner's house flag, the "O. M. Clark" will 
sail from San Francisco September 28 for the 
Mexican west coast with a full cargo of freight 
guaranteed. The California South Seas Navi- 
gation Company has two steamers at present 
running to Mexico and Central American ports. 
These are the "Fort Bragg" and the "Coaster," 
which are scheduled to sail from this city south 
almost immediately after discharging upon their 
arrival here. The "Coaster" sailed several days 
ago with both passengers and freight aboard 
and will proceed south as far as Balboa. It 
will not be able to return to port until the latter 
part of the month. So profitable has the Mexi- 
can and Central American trade become that 
five companies are engaged in a regular trade 
with these countries. The Pacific Mail Com- 
pany, the original company in the service, main- 
tains a fleet of several ships. The California 
and Mexican Steamship Line runs the "Solano" 
and San Carlos. The cargo space on the for- 
mer has all been engaged, although it does not 
sail for several days. The Mexican National 
Trading Company maintains the "Fairhaven" 
ami the "San Ramon," and the C. Henry Smith 
Company the "Sinaloa" and "Baja California," 
which also go to South America. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants' Exchange BIdg., Third Floor. Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone Kearny 
394. (Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' 

FEDERATION. 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary, 

570 West Lake St., Chicago, III. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass, 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway St 
NEW YORK CITY, 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St 
NORFOLK, Va., 41 Loyalls Lane. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 South Commerce St 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 12 South St. Telephone 2107 

Broad. Night Call 2108 Spring. 
New York Branch, 400 West St. Telephone 5153 
Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 258 Commercial St 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 117 Decatur St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 806 South Broadway. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 
Headquarters (temporary): 
BOSTON, Mass, 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
NEW YORK, 51 South St. and 280 West St 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway 
NORFOLK, Va., 41 Loyalls Lane. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 190 West St. Phone 4126 Worth. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 15 Twelfth St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 445 La Salle Ave. 
DETROIT, Mich., 27 Jefferson Ave. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
HEADQUARTERS: 
406 N. Clark St., Chicago, III. 
Telephone Main 365. 
BRANCHES: 
Buffalo, N. Y. Toledo, O. 

Cleveland, O. North Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Milwaukee, Wis. Superior, Wis. 

Ashtabula, O. Erie, Pa. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal.. 59 Clay St. 

Branches: 
VANCOUVER, B. C, 213 Hasting St., E. corner of 
Hasting and Main, P. O. Box 1365, Tel. Seymour 8703. 
TACOMA, Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 
SEATTLE, Wash., 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65. 
ABlOIinEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 
PORTLAND, Ore., 44 Union Ave., North. 

i:i<A, Cal., 227 First St., P. O. Box 64. 
SAV PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67. 
IiONOLULU, H. T., Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sis , 
P. O. Box 314. 

(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 

BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



PAUL SCHARRENBERG K, Utor 

'• M HOLT Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mall - $2.00 | Six months - - 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



$1.00 



Changes In advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noi t" each week. 

To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all con ions of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postofflce as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 
ly Street, San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 
Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published In die JOURNAL, provided they are of gen- 
eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, ani mled by the writer's name 

and address. The JOURNAL Is not responsible for 
the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 29, 1915. 



SEAMEN— ATTENTION. 



All seamen in port at San Francisco on 
this day, Wednesday, September 29, are urged 
to come to the mass meeting to be held under 
the auspices of the International Seamen's 
Union of America, in the Maritime Hall, 59 
Clay street. 

The success or failure of the new Seamen's 
law will, in a large degree, depend upon the 
men now employed on American vessels, 
union and non-union men alike. 

It is your duty to acquaint yourself fully 
with all phases of the new legislation. 

Remember, the new law will go into effect 
on American ships on Thursday, Novem- 
ber 4, of this year. And bear in mind that 
the time is nearly at hand when "Able-Sea- 
men" certificates and "Lifeboat-men's" cer- 
tificates will be issued by the Federal officials 
entrusted with such work. 

Every man who follows the sea for a live- 
lihood will be affected by the new law. Fire- 
men, cooks, waiters, etc., as well as the men 
of the deck department, should therefore em- 
brace every opportunity to make themselves 
thoroughly familiar with their new privileges 
and responsibilities. If you can not come to 
the educational meetings which are held from 
time to time in the principal ports, be sure 
to call for a copy of the pamphlet explaining 
all the details of the new law. Copies of this 
pamphlet may be had for the asking at any 
of the Seamen's Union offices. 

Again, remember, this law was enacted to 
make it possible for seamen to better their 
conditions. Rut laws, by themselves, can not 
improve the condition of any class of work- 
ers. Laws, unless properly enforced, are but 
idle phrases and sentences. With the intel- 
ligent and earnest co-operation of all seamen, 
however, the Seamen's law can be made a 
powerful lever for progress. Only when 
every seaman knows his rights and fully 
understands how to seek redress for viola- 
tions of the law — only then will it be possi- 
ble to obtain the full benefit of the new 
legislation. 

And, in conclusion, remember, no one can 
help you to secure greater, better and nobler 
things, unless you yourself are willing to 
lend a hand. 



ROCKEFELLER'S "PARTNERS." 



From the standpoint of the initiated, the 
public press, with rare exceptions, has never 
been regarded as anything but a sycophant 
of the rich and influential. Recently, how- 
ever, it appears that each individual news- 
paper throughout the land is making strenu- 
ous efforts to outrival contemporaries, in ob- 
sequious attitude towards the Rockefellers. 
In San Francisco the public has been enter- 
tained with leading articles in conspicuous 
columns of the daily papers, the headings of 
which, if not humorous, must furnish food 
for thought in the minds of the working peo- 
ple. A superficial analysis of some of the 
aforesaid press effusions discloses some seri- 
ous as well as absurd conditions pertaining 
to young Rockefeller's mountebank antics in 
Colorado. One of the columns of a recent 
issue of the San Francisco Chronicle, devoted 
to adulation of John D., Jr., contained in 
large type the following interesting headings : 
"Rockefeller in Overalls Picks Coal." "The 
Young Millionaire Makes the Rounds of His 
Colorado Mines." "Gives Talks to the Men." 
"Bumps His Head in Tunnel and Takes Up 
Case of Harness Galled Mule." 

After describing in detail the process of 
John D. Rockefeller, Jr., donning overalls 
and jumper in the Frederick mine at Valdez, 
the article shows with what ecstacy of glee 
this scion of predatory wealth took a pick 
from the hands of a grimy son of toil and 
caused a few marbles of coal to rattle on 
the floor. 

After this most plebeian and unusual exer- 
cise, Young Rockefeller evidently considered 
himself entitled to a place in the annals of 
fame among the workers, as he is credited 
with relieving his mind of the following clas- 
sic expression : "Men, we are partners in 
this business. Anybody from inside the camp 
or from outside who has been telling you 
that we are enemies has been trying to de- 
ceive you. I can't get along without you 
and you can't get along without me." 

This condescending emanation from a per- 
sonage of such august station might well 
tend to solve the problem of industrial un- 
rest. It might even cause the exploited and 
abused to forget that they ever did have a 
grievance. These ignorant, horny-fisted sons 
of toil taken into partnership with John D. 
Rockefeller, Jr.. at the very first meeting 
should be cause for ecstatic rejoicing. How- 
ever, the wintry wind is not so unkind as 
man's ingratitude. We find that while young 
Rockefeller was reported as hobnobbing with 
the employes of the Colorado Fuel and Iron 
Company, "dancing tango with miners' daugh- 
"picking coal," "grieving over chafed 
mules," etc., that the Colorado State Federa- 
tion i >f Labor was in session in Denver pre- 
paring to prevent any repetition of his previ- 
ous activities which resulted in the holocaust 
at Ludlow. 

The following dispatch, dated Denver, Sep- 
tember 21, is self-explanatory: 

Evidence against "Rockefeller and his tools" 
in connection with occurrences of the recent Colo- 
rado coal miners' strike will be laid before either 
Attorney-General Farrar or the Federal authori- 
al >on the arrival here of A. M. Belcher, 
attorney for the United Mine Workers of 
America, William Diamond, representati 
President White of the miners' union in this 
district, told delegates to the State Federation 
bor here to-day. P.elcher is reported en 
route to Denver from West Virginia. 

The executive committee in its report urged 
all labor unions throughout the country "to voice 
their protest against wanton atrocities, masquer- 
ading as legalities, which are being perpetrated 
in Colorado." 

From past experience we are compelled 



to put little faith in the results of placing 
evidence against the Rockefellers ; but we 
feel that the shadow of Ludlow and the 
travesty of Lawson's trial will not down, not- 
withstanding the efforts of John D., Jr. — who 
has tried to disclaim all responsibility — and 
his servile henchmen. 

If young Rockefeller maintained even the 
slightest belief in the Christian religion which 
he pretends to expound, the punishment of 
his conscience would be almost unbearable. 
Like Banquo's ghost, his sins would contin- 
ually appear in accusing attitude. If he were 
really desirous of giving his employes just 
and humane treatment it would not be neces- 
sary for him to promenade before the world 
as an interested investigator making observa- 
tions of his own wanton acts. 

These present activities nor any future mas- 
querading on the part of Rockefeller, Jr., 
will never drive from the thoughts of the 
workers the picture of that unjustly accused 
and wrongly convicted Lawson pacing the 
dull confines of his cell and burning with 
thoughts of iniquitous injustice. Neither can 
we forget the overwhelming anguish of the 
workers' mothers watching their little ones 
burn to death in the black hole of Ludlow. 

April 20, 1913, will stand out forever, in 
the minds of thinking people, as the darkest 
hours of American industrial history. The 
spirits of our martyred innocents still cry to 
the heavens for justice. A stain has been 
placed upon the vista of years that cannot 
be removed ; it will show the transparent ef- 
forts of the Rockefellers and their kind in 
all their brutal perfidy. Even the poor ex- 
ploited feudal slaves of the Colorado Fuel 
and Iron Company must feel disgust at the 
thought of partnership with John D., Jr. 

Meanwhile the public press plays up the 
spectacular performances of young Rocke- 
feller, while abuse and wanton murder of his 
employes receives but little consideration or 
publicity. 



WELCOME PUBLICITY. 



The current Saturday Evening Post of 
Philadelphia is giving splendid publicity to 
the fairly well discredited attempt of the 
"interests" to have the new Seamen's law 
repealed even before it has gone into effect. 

Mr. Peter P. Kyne, the noted San Fran- 
cisco writer, is the author of the Post's lead- 
ing article, entitled "Our Maritime Bugaboo." 
Only the first installment of Mr. Kyne's arti- 
cle is published in the current issue, but to 
one who has followed the malicious campaign 
of newspaper misrepresentation it comes as 
a pleasant relief. 

The article written by Mr. Kyne is an ex- 
cellent presentation of a difficult subject. It 
is written in simple and entertaining style, 
in plain language and without the use of 
technical terms. 

If there were more publications like the 
Saturday Evening Post, the American public 
would soon learn to understand all that is 
worth while knowing about the new Sea- 
men's law. Unfortunately, no other publica- 
tion with a general, nation-wide circulation 
has given anyone an opportunity to present 
the plain, unvarnished truth about that epoch- 
making legislation. 

Both Mr. Kyne and the management of 
the Saturday Evening Post are to be con- 
gratulated for rendering this public service. 



Labor will never realize its rights until 
it recognizes its wrongs. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



CANADIAN WORKERS ALERT. 



The recent convention of the Canadian 
Trades and Labor Congress not only gave a 
practical endorsement to the La Follette Sea- 
men's Act but coupled with it a request to 
the Dominion and Home government to give 
serious and sympathetic consideration to the 
new Seamen's law with a view of securing 
similar enactments for the Pritish empire. 

The resolutions in question have an im- 
portant bearing upon current events. They 
require no elaborate explanation and are full 
of the deepest significance to all peoples of 
the Caucasian race. 

To quote : 

Whereas, We realize that sea power has been 
a most potent factor in the building and main- 
taining of our empire, and whereas, this power 
was built and maintained by the blood of British 
men of our race; and 

Whereas, We feel that during the present 
great struggle the power to control the sea is 
again one of the deciding factors that shall 
finally help to bring to our people a just and 
honorable peace; and 

Whereas, We have noted that for some years 
prior to this struggle there was a distinct ten- 
dency of the men of our blood to leave the sea 
to men of other races, because of the seamen's 
inability under existing laws to participate in 
the onward and upward trend of modern soci- 
ety; and 

Whereas, This has its origin in laws which 
deny to the seaman the equal freedom with 
other workers; and 

Whereas, The United States had adopted new 
laws which give such freedom, not only to sea- 
men under the American flag, but to all seamen 
coming within the jurisdiction of the United 
States; therefore be it 

Resolved, That we urge upon the statesmen 
and the people of our empire to give to these 
laws their most serious and sympathetic con- 
sideration; and be it further 

Resolved, That it is our belief that as men 
of our blood built our sea power, by men of 
our blood must it be maintained, and to this end 
the laws governing seamen must be so changed 
that men of our race shall again seek the sea, 
shall again have the old pride in their work and 
the full consciousness of its importance to our 
race and our empire; and further 

Resolved, That copies of these resolutions be 
forwarded to the government of the Dominion 
of Canada and to the government of Great 
Britain. 



"OUR FLAG" AGAIN. 



'Tis strange but true, that notwithstanding 
the awful noise made by the Schwerin-Dollar 
calamity-howlers, foreign steamship companies 
show a growing inclination to take up the 
trade voluntarily relinquished by the local 
coolie-lovers. 

In particular we note the following current 

press item : 

In addition to the announcement that the 
Dutch transportation line, known as the Java- 
China-Japan Line, will shortly inaugurate a serv- 
ice of eight large vessels between San Fran- 
cisco, China and the Philippines, comes the in- 
formation from Andrew Weir & Co. in London 
announcing that the Bank line will enter the 
San Francisco-Orient trade. The big British 
line controls more than forty vessels, part of 
which are now operating between New York, 
China, Japan and the Straits Settlements. Some 
of the Bank line freighters from New York 
to Japan are using the Panama Canal route; 
those going to other parts of the Orient are 
routed via the Suez Canal. The cable from 
London to the local agents of the Weir line 
stated that the steamer "Inveric," a compara- 
tively new vessel of 5,000 tons, would be the 
first to arrive here in connection with the new 
service, the details of which have not been 
worked out fullv. The "Inveric" will begin 
loading at Hongkong for this port about No- 
vember 1. It is expected that before the "In- 
veric's" arrival other sailings will be announced. 

The respective managers of these foreign 
lines are, of course, fully aware of the fact 
that their vessels will have to comply with 
the same provisions of the Seamen's law 
which are alleged to have driven the Pacific 
Mail Company "out of business." They will 
have to carry crews who can understand the 
language of the officers and that is precisely 
what Messrs. Schwerin and Dollar claim 
could not be done. 

Some day the dear people will realize what 



a magnificent bunco game these self-styled 
patriots have conducted. 

As a cloak for cheap Oriental crews "our 
flag" has very nearly come to the end of its 
service. For which we are, again, deeply and 
truly grateful. 



As was predicted in these columns, when 
the Pacific Mail Company sold its five 
American transpacific vessels, the steamship 
"Korea" sailed from San Francisco for Lon- 
don during the past week under the Amer- 
ican flag and with more "Americans" in her 
crew than she ever carried before. Let it be 
said to the credit of Mr. Schwerin's yellow 
pets that they absolutely refused to go to the 
European war zone for $7 per month. And 
let us incidentally rejoice over the first "net" 
result of that "outrageous Seamen's bill." 
A Chinese crew has been replaced — not by 
union men, but by men who are eligible for 
admission to American trade-unions and to 
American citizenship ! 



On Thursday of last week a very success- 
ful mass meeting of seamen was held in the 
commodious reading-room of the Seamen's 
Institute at San Francisco. John Vance 
Thompson presided, and Patrick Flynn, Wal- 
ter Macarthur and Paul Scharrenberg ad- 
dressed the meeting. On behalf of the or- 
ganized seamen of America, the Journal 
herewith expresses grateful appreciation to 
the Rev. M. Mullineux, chaplain of the In- 
stitute, for his uniform kindness on this and 
previous occasions. 



MASS MEETING AT SEATTLE. 



A rousing mass meeting at Seattle, Wash., 
held on September 18, under the auspices of 
the Public Ownership League, and attended 
by more than 2500 citizens, unanimously 
adopted the following memorial: 

To His Excellency, Woodrow Wilson, President, 
and the Honorable the Members of the Sen- 
ate and the House of Representatives of the 
Congress of the United States: 
Honored Sirs: — In view of the frantic efforts 
now being put forth by privilege-seeking inter- 
ests and their kept press to discredit what has 
come to be known as the La Follette Seamen's 
Law, even in advance of its going into opera- 
tion, with the avowed purpose of securing its 
repeal before it has been fairly tested, we call 
your attention to a brief summary of facts. We 
do this with the hope that we may in some 
measure contribute toward bringing you to a 
realization that the brazen misrepresentations 
employed in support of the efforts referred to, 
are not going unchallenged by the hosts of 
Democracy. 

We trust it is unnecessary to dwell upon the 
wrongs imposed upon the sailors of all coun- 
tries, and especially those of the United States, 
in the past in consequence of the iniquitous laws 
relating to seamen, once they signed for a voy- 
age until their return to their home port. It 
must be apparent to all that when the laws reg- 
ulating any calling virtually make slaves of 
the men engaged therein, the effect is bound to 
be that most, if not all, intelligent and self- 
respecting men will be driven therefrom, thus 
not only lowering the efficiency but degrading 
the calling. 

Neither should it be necessary to direct your 
attention to the fearful loss of life resulting from 
recent disasters at sea in consequence of insuffi- 
cient life-saving apparatus and the want of sea- 
men skilled in the handling and manning of the 
same. 

To remedy these two defects in our antiquated 
navigation laws the Seamen's bill was passed. 
It was not a hastily prepared and inadequately 
considered measure. It was substantially the 
same bill that had been before Congress for 
many years and passed by the preceding Con- 
gress, but prevented from becoming law by the 
veto of President Taft. Every legitimate argu- 
ment that is being made against it now was 
made against it then. But the necessity for 
legislation to remedy the defects referred to, 
being of the highest importance, and the argu- 
ments in support of this particular bill so far 
outweighed those of the opposition, the present 
Concrress passed it again and it was signed by 
the President. 

Now to give apparent substance to the argu- 
ment that the law would destroy the American 
(Continued on Page 10.) 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 27, 1915. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., E. A. Erickson presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping dull, plenty of members ashore. 
A Quarterly Finance Committee was elected to 
examine the Union's accounts for the past three 
months. The vote upon the appropriation of 
$3600 to be used by the International Seamen's 
Union for organizing purposes was declared car- 
ried. The meeting was addressed by Andrew 
Furuseth. 

NOTICE — A mass meeting will be held at the 
Maritime Hall, 59 Clay street, Wednesday, Sept. 
29. Andrew Furuseth will explain all phases of 
the new Seamen's law. All seamen in port 
(union and non-union) are invited. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, Secretary pro tern. 

Maritime Building, 59 Clay St. Phone Kearny 
2228. 



Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 20, 1915. 
Shipping dull; prospects poor. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
213 Hastings St., E. corner of Hastings and 
Main. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 20, 1915. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 20, 1915. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 20, 1915. 
Shipping medium; prospects poor. 

J. PEARSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 20, 1915. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
44 Union Ave. North. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 20, 1915. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

JOHN ANDERSON, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 20, 1915. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128^ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 13, 1915. 
Shipping medium; prospects uncertain. 

JACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 23, 1915. 

The regular weekly meeting was called to 
order at 7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. 
Secretary reported shipping fair, plenty of men 
around. Balloting on election of delegate to 
the California State Federation of Labor Con- 
vention, to be held in Santa Rosa, Oct. 4, was 
proceeded with. The Quarterly Finance Com- 
mittee was elected. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

42 Market St. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 16, 1915. 
Shipping slow; good many ashore. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203. P. O. Box 214. 
Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 15, 1915. 
No meeting. Shipping good for waiters, very 
slow for cooks, many cooks ashore. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 20, 1915. 
No meeting. Shipping medium; prospects dull. 

THOMAS BAKER, Agent. 
89 Second St. N. Phone Broadway 2306. 



urn 



DIED. 

Charles Ziffcr, No. 22, a native of Austria, age 
42, was drowned from the Schooner "Hugh 
IN .in" at sea, April, 1915. 

Paul Olssini, No. 165, a native of Sweden, age 
45, died on boprd the ship "Star of Russia" at 
- i. April 26, 1915. 

Max Hoderman, No. 1855. a native of Ger- 
many, age 35, drowned at Sooke, R. ('.. May 
2, 1915. 

Adolf Jager, No. 1855, a native of Norway, 
age 29, died at San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 23, 
1915. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



"THE JUDAS." 

(By Reginald Wright Kaufman.) 



I claim the Right to Work — 

For whatever the Boss will pay: 
If the wage is low, why out you go 

And in I come to stay! 

I've not your skill, 

But I've got the will 
To <lo as my masters say. 

I claim the Right to Work — 

Till my very soul is raw; 
I claim the right for day and night 

So long as a cent I draw; 

For when you quit 

I earn my bit; 
So I'm for a twelve-hour law. 

I claim the Right to Work — 

In a shop where few may thrive; 
In dust and smell, or fire trap's hell 

From five o'clock till five; 

Though every breath 

Is sick with death, 
What matter if I'm alive? 

I force the wages down? 

Or the many to slave and shirk? 
Although I quicken, the hundreds sicken 

Amid the muck and mirk. 

Well, what care I 

If the workers die 
I claim the Right to Work! 



"STOP THE WAR." 

(By J. Scott Duckers.*) 



There is no record of the original quarrel 
hot ween the Kilkenny Cats. We only know 
their fate. They fought until a piece of 
claw and the tip of a tail were the only 
hits left. They "fought to a finish" in the 
most literal sense. Evenly matched, de- 
termined to win, with no thought of com- 
promise, they destroyed one another in 
their mutual rage. This is what the great 
Powers of Europe are doing to-day. King- 
doms and empires are fighting like Kil- 
kenny Cats. They will fight, say their 
statesmen, to the very last gasp. 

But why? Why should they do this? 
Do they really want to fight until every 
home is bereaved, and every country bank- 
rupt? Do they really wish nothing short of 
the extermination of their opponents — the 
slaughter of every man, woman and child 
on the opposing side? Of course not, these 
platform declarations are only platform 
rhetoric. They are fighting for terms — 
good terms for the victors : bad terms for 
the vanquished. 

But supposing there arc no decisive vic- 
tors, and none utterly vanquished? Then, 
again, it is merely a question of terms — 
the terms on which it is better to settle 
than to go on with the fight. 

So that sooner or later it all comes down 
i.i a question of terms — the terms on which 
all parties can make the best adjustment — 
the terms it is better for all to accept. 

Then why not get to this stage at once? 
Why have all these millions of men tear- 
ing at each other's throats, why permit 
these unspeakable barbarities, this colossal 
and insane waste of money and life, why 
permit a single day of this futile and un- 
necessary strife? 

The war has gone on long enough for us 
to see that the Allies cannot "crush Ger- 
many," and Germany cannot conquer the 



Mr. Duckers is Chairman of the British 
"Stop-the-War" Committee which has just is- 
sued a new leaflet, entitled "Some Reasons Why 
the War Should be Stopped." Copies can be 
obtained from the Committee, 66 Charing Cross 
Road, London, W. C. 



Allies. The original causes are so involved 
and obscured by denials and recrimination 
that the people in every country will for 
a long time go on believing that their 
statesmen are absolutely blameless, and 
everything on their side is absolutely just 
and correct. Shells and bayonets may con- 
vince them that it is useless to argue, but 
they will never convince them that their 
opponents are right. Peace will come when 
they see it is no use prolonging the contest. 

Have we not come to that point already? 

Is it not better to try to make an im- 
mediate settlement? How shall we be in 
any way nearer a lasting peace if the fight- 
ing continues for another twelve months? 
Our opponents will sustain great losses in 
the meantime, but so shall we. Our Allies 
will be suffering. Anguish and ruin will 
be all over Europe. 

If our rulers had to settle this them- 
selves, would they personally fight? If our 
Kin- and his cousin the Kaiser were put in 
a room together, would they share the fate 
of the Kilkenny Cats? Would our Prime 
Minister fly at the throat of the German 
Chancellor, or Mr. Balfour stab Von Tir- 
pitz? Of course not. They might discuss 
and argue, and bluff and wrangle, but it 
would only be a question of the terms 
which they could induce the others to 
accept. 

In every country the interests and wishes 
of the great mass of the people are for 
peace — not "peace at any price," but peace 
on the best terms they can get. Let our 
rulers find these out at once. "Stop-the- 
War" movements are developing in France 
and Germany. In Italy a large minority 
has always favored peace. Brave men and 
w i mien in Russia have suffered things we 
cannot conceive. The only way we can 
help these people with their Governments 
is not by abusing the "enemy," but by op- 
posing the militarist spirit in our midst. 

Let us make a real and genuine effort to 
bring Britain's part in the war to an im- 
mediate, honorable, and righteous finish. 



After a lapse of nearly a year a case of 
human plague occurred in the city of New 
Orleans on August 27. This case was con- 
firmed as true bubonic plague on Septem- 
ber 8. The epidemiological investigations 
a- to the exact source of the infection have 
nut yet been completed but it is believed 
that it was probably received in the city 
of Xew Orleans. Up to date over 91,000 
buildings in that city have been rat-proofed 
and over 435,000 rodents have been cap 
tured in traps alone. The occurrence of 
this case demonstrates the difficulties sur- 
rounding the eradication of the disease and 
indicate that had it not been for the active 
co-operative efforts of the United States 
Publie Health Service and of the Depart- 
ments of Health of the State of Louisiana 
and the city of New Orleans, the outbreak 
would have reached greater proportions and 
would have been longer continued. It also 
points nut to other cities the necessity for 
ridding themselves of the rodent carriers of 
the disease and of thon mghly rat-proofing 
all of their buildings. No fear is felt that 
this case will be followed by an outbreak. 
Officers and men of the Public Health 
Service, well trained in the control of the 
disease, are on the ground and with the 
health authorities of the city of New Or- 
leans are taking every precaution to pre- 
vent the spread of the disease from the 
city and within it. 



FRENCH WORKERS WANT PEACE. 



The representatives of the organized 
French workers have just met in confer- 
ence at Paris, under the auspices of the 
Ceneral Labor Federation. At the three 
meetings over which M. Luquet presided, 
there were present 169 delegates represent- 
ing 14 labor organizations, 38 national 
labor federations, 43 labor exchanges and 34 
departmental unions of labor. British 
unionists were represented by Messrs. 
Appleton, O'Grady and Crinion, the latter 
having come to France to visit the soldiers 
at the British front. The special object 
of the conference was to examine into the 
role to be played in the present situation 
by labor organizations. 

The resolution adopted recalls the fact 
that the opposition of the General Labor 
Federation to war has been systematically 
confirmed throughout by its action, its 
propaganda and its relations with similar 
institutions abroad. This was specially 
noticeable in 1901 after the Fashoda inci- 
dent and in 1906 after the Tangier ques- 
tion. Its only desire at all times has been, 
it states, to create generally an atmosphere 
of peace. 

The resolution then goes on to state that 
in acting in this manner the Federation 
has rendered impossible all aggression by 
France against any other country what- 
ever, thus inspiring her with that true in- 
ternational sentiment which regards all 
nations as forming part of the great hu- 
man family whose action and co-operation 
is indispensable for the work of social 
emancipation which constitutes the very 
foundation of the General Labor Federa- 
tion. 

Further that under all conditions the 
Federation is convinced that it has, at all 
and in all directions, worked in con- 
formity with the constitutional ideals of 
internationalism and consequently stands 
ready to meet the verdict of the proletariats 
of all other nations. By this fundamental 
basis the Federation affirms at one and the 
same time its ardent love for an entente 
between the peoples of the world and its 
desire to see the re-establishment of that 
peace for the maintenance of which it has 
the satisfaction of knowing that it has done 
all within its power. 

The conference disapproves of all policy 
of conquest and appeals to the working 
classes of all countries to support a peace 
which shall enable right to triumph defi- 
nitely over might, and trusts that out of 
the guaranties accepted by all countries, 
viz : compulsory arbitration, of international 
disputes, suppression of secret diplomacy 
and entire elimination of armaments, there 
will arise the possibility of the constitu- 
tion of such a federation of the nations 
as will assure to all peoples the right to 
manage freely their own concerns and 
thereby secure the independence of all na- 
tions. 

The resolution also recommends the 
adoption of the proposal made by the 
American Federation of Labor to hold an 
international conference at the same place 
and at the same time as the diplomatic 
congress for arranging peace terms. 



Why don't opponents of the Seamen's law 
come out into the open and say they want 
ship subsidies? That, at least, would be an 
honest statement. Why do they hesitate to 
make an honest statement ?— San Francisco 
Star. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



FISHERMEN'S "WAR WAGES." 

(By Paul Muller.) 



German deep-sea fishing, especially in 
the North Sea, is, of course, affected by .the 
naval war between Germany and Englan.l ; 
but certainly not to a greater degree than 
England's deep-sea fishing itself. In spite 
of everything, Germany's deep-sea fishing 
flourishes to a far greater extent than its 
navigation for purposes of trade. This ap- 
plies not only to the North Sea, but prin- 
cipally to the Baltic where, with the aid 
of fishing steamers from the North Sea, 
new and more national methods of deep- 
sea fishing have been carried through. 

Here, as well as in the carrying trade, 
the high prices of provisions due to the 
war, affect the crews. Here, as well as 
there, certain dangers incidental to war- 
fare threaten the life, the health and the 
property of the crews. These reasons have 
induced the crews of the Elbe and Weser 
districts, who are organized in the German 
Transport Workers' Union, to approach 
the union of owners of fishing steamers 
with demands for increased wages as well 
as for a special insurance against war risks 
and loss of personal belongings. 

After some negotiations between ship- 
pers and representatives of the union in 
the Weser and Elbe districts, this action 
on the part of the union was brought to 
a wholly successful conclusion. 

The following regulations which are to 
be in force during the war were fixed by 
contract between the united shippers and 
the organized crews : 

A. War Wages. 

1. Unmarried men receive a monthly 
war allowance of 10 marks in addition to 
their usual wages; married men, IS marks, 
retroactive from May 1 of the current year. 

2. It is agreed to give further considera- 
tion to raise the war allowance to married 
men by another 5 marks. 

B. War Insurance. 

1. In case the crews lose their lives, the 
relatives to whom the Seamen's Association 
grants full pension, receive a non-recurring 
indemnity of 3,500 marks in case of a cap- 
tain losing his life, 2,250 marks in case of 
second mate, 2,500 marks in case of the first 
engineer, 2,000 marks in case of the second 
engineer and 1,750 marks in case of a mem- 
ber of the rest of the crew. 

2. In case of invalidity a non-recurring 
compensation of double the amount of the 
first year's pension fixed by the Seamen's As- 
sociation, is granted. 

3. In case the crews are taken prisoner 
their relatives are to receive the following 
monthly allowances during the term of im- 
prisonment: the captain's wife 100 marks; the 
wife of the second mate 70 marks, the wife of 
the first engineer 80 marks, the wife of the 
second engineer 70 marks, the wives of the 
rest of the crew 40 marks; for each child 
10 marks a month is to be granted. 

4. In case neither wife nor children but 
other relatives dependent on the person in 
question exist, the above mentioned allow- 
ance is granted to them, in proportion to the 
state allowance to participants in the war 
which they receive. 

5. In case of loss of personal belongings, 
600 marks are paid to the captain, 400 marks 
to the second mate, 300 marks to each of 
the engineers and 250 marks to each member 
of the rest of the crew. 

Undoubtedly this new agreement is a great 



success, especially as it has been gained by 
the organized crews and their represent- 
atives in the Elbe and Weser districts dur- 
ing these serious times of war. 

As it happens our "revolutionary" friends 
in hostile countries are mistaken in their as- 
sumption that we in Germany only think of 
war and noisily talk of war to the detriment 
and neglect of our trade-union tasks. 



WAR RISK REPORT. 



The first annual report of Mr. William 
C. De Lanoy, director of the Bureau of 
War Risk Insurance, which was established 
September 2, 1914, to write insurance on 
American ships and cargoes against the 
dangers of war shows that during the year 
policies were written on war risks aggre- 
gating $82,709,689. The total number of 
policies written was 1,245, or an average 
of above 100 a month. The total net 
premiums received by the Government 
amounted to $2,004,695.65. The losses paid 
aggregate $720,653, being for the "Evelyn," 
the "Carib," the "Greenbrier" and the 
"William P. Frye." A salvage of $25,232.02 
has been received for the "Evelyn's" cot- 
ton, however, making the net losses $695,- 
420.98. Further remittances are to come 
for salvage and these will further reduce 
the net losses. The net losses paid, de- 
ducted from the premiums received of $2,- 
004,695.65, leave a surplus of premiums re- 
ceived of $1,309,274.67. The total expenses 
of organizing the bureau, printing and 
stationary, including the salaries of the en- 
tire force amounted to $17,711.71 for the 
year. The amount appropriated for the ex- 
penses being $100,000, there remains a bal- 
ance of $82,288.29. The possible outstand- 
ing claims are $100,000, and the total 
amount of insurance at risk on September 
1, 1915, was $6,915,215. 



CRITICISM OF MR. REDFIELD. 



It is strongly rumored that Secretary Red- 
field, of the Bureau of Commerce and La- 
bor, feels the comment made by the news- 
papers and friends of the victims of the 
"Eastland" horror so keenly that he may re- 
sign from office. Mr. Redfield may know the 
amenities of society by heart, but some of 
the criticisms appearing in public print inti- 
mated that as a private citizen he was more 
of a success than as a Cabinet officer. Of 
course it is conceded that Mr. Redfield could 
not by any possible hook or crook inspect 
every passenger boat plying upon the inland 
waters of the United States, but it was shown 
that many months prior to the awful disaster 
he had in his possession documents from a 
trustworthy source complaining of the very 
things which caused the disaster. The Chi- 
cago Federation of Labor forwarded em- 
phatic protests and backed up those protests 
with facts and figures, according to the 
secretary of that body, but apparently no 
attention was paid to them. All the investi- 
gations, indictments and trials which may 
take place after the horrible catastrophe 
can not bring to life the hundreds who went 
to a watery grave through the dilatory prac- 
tices of men who were charged with a duty 
greater than themselves. Practical men are 
needed more than social lions. — Cincinnati 
Chronicle. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above stated 
reasons, or because of rules of the so-called 
"Welfare Plan," by any agent or represent- 
ative of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied concerns, including the 
masters and officers of the ships. 
Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 

LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 

570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 

BRANCHES AND AGENCIES: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 15 Twelfth Street 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

HEADQUARTERS : 

71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 445 LaSalle Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS: 
406 N. Clark St., Chicago, III. 
Telephone Main 365. 
BRANCHES: 
Buffalo, N. Y. Toledo, O. 

Cleveland, O. North Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Milwaukee, Wis. Superior, Wis. 

Ashtabula, O. Erie, Pa. 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Journal's ad columns. 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

MARINE HOSPITALS: 

CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O, 



RELIEF 
Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
i i ni.iba, Mich. 
Grand llaven, Mich. 
Gn en Bay, Mich. 
Houghton, Mich. 
ton, Mich. 
11 nlstee, Mich. 
Erie, Pa. 
i <>minee, Mich. 



STATIONS: 
Ogdensburg, N. Y. 
Oswego, N. Y. 
Port Huron, Mi' 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 
Sandusky, O. 

sic. Mai le, Mli h. 

I. boygan, Wis. 
■r ior. Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



told that we could not get any further con- 
sideration until the Legislature would in- 
crease the appropriation. 

"Prior to the meeting of the Legislature 
we called a conference in Chicago of rep- 
resentatives of all the unions in the State 
institutions and outlined our future de- 
mands and presented them to the State 
Board so that the State Board could be 
guided in making up their budget for the 
appropriation committee of the Legislature. 
We asked a minimum of $40 per month 
for men and women, one day rest in seven 
and a tribunal to consider grievances, with 
the right to appeal to the State Board. 

"The State Board made the demand upon 
the appropriation committee in good faith, 
but was turned down, and its appropria- 
tion, instead of being increased, was de- 
creased. Also we had a 'one-day-rest-in- 
seven' bill before the Legislature, which 
was defeated, so the outlook for any ad- 
vance looked a thousand miles away. 

"We then asked the State Board to give 
us a hearing in Chicago, and at that time 
we again presented our program. 

"After a hearing that lasted nearly six 
hours, the Board ordered the establishment 
of the one-day rest in seven, equalized the 
wages of men and women, authorized an 
automatic increase of wages based on the 
length of service, and under the eight-hour 
day the shifts to change every seven days 
instead of every thirty as heretofore. 

"You can easily guess we were elated 
with the result of our efforts, when all this 
happened in face of the fact that the Leg- 
islature decreased the appropriation and de- 
feated our 'one-day-rest-in-seven' bill. Here 
is an exhibition of making progress through 
our trade-union activity in spite of the Leg- 
islature." 



Unrest Probe Is of Value. 

The Racine Call, of Racine, Wis., urges 
Congress to take action on our present in- 
dustrial unrest and insists that the report 
of the Commission on Industrial Relations 
supplies necessary information and reme- 
dies. 

The Call says: 

"The report of the Industrial Relations 
Commission offers Congress one of the 
greatest opportunities in the history of the 
Nation, an opportunity to effectively deal 
with a problem which has been pressing 
for solution for years and growing more 
complicated each year because of failure to 
solve it. 

"America, in common with all the world, 
recognizes the big problem of the twen- 
tieth century to be in its industrial life. 

"The Industrial Relations Commission 
has recognized the size and importance of 
the problem which it was set, not so much 
to solve as to explain, and illuminate. 
The solution is for the people, and their 
elected representatives. 

"The work of the Commission set forth 
in its reports and as embodied in the hear- 
ings it held are a sort of Great Charter of 
industrial democracy. It will be a guide 
and source of information for years to 
come. 

"The purpose of the Commission was 
not to 'allay unrest,' but to find out what 
the causes were, and by stating them and 
basing recommendations upon them to en- 



able the people to deal capably with their 
industrial problems and with their interre- 
lated political problems. 

"Against terrific pressure of blandish- 
ment and abuse, Chairman Walsh held the 
Commission to a line of deep investigation. 
The pace he set carried even the most con- 
servative of the Commission to such a 
statement of existing industrial wrongs and 
such an outline of remedies as hardly the 
most radical of industrial reformers had 
dared hope to have issued with official 
sanction. 

"From these reports and these disagree- 
ments the political republic will be the 
better able to fashion a republic of better 
distributed wealth and a republic of in- 
dustrial justice." 



Wire Men's Wages Raised. 

An arbitration board has increased 
wages of electricians employed by the To- 
ronto Hydro-Electric Commission ten per 
cent., beginning the first of next May. A 
three years' contract is recommended, start- 
ing May 1 of this year. Wages are to re- 
main unchanged until after the first year 
when the increase will be come operative. 
The award will continue after the three 
years until such time as either party de- 
sires a change, when one month's notice is 
necessary. The board expresses the opin- 
ion that $22.50 a week is neeessary to 
maintain living conditions in Toronto. 

The board strongly voices the opinion 
that a public ownership enterprise of the 
character of the Toronto hydro-electric 
system should base its rates and charges 
and have its estimates so arranged as to 
provide for the reasonable and moderate 
living expenses, or wages, of all its em- 
ployes, and that in reducing rates this 
should be one of the first considerations ; 
in other words, the board is of the opinion 
that it is the duty of a public-owned utili- 
ties commission to set a good example in 
the matter of wages and working condi- 
tions to private-owned corporations. 



Reason for Timber Strikes. 

Members of the International Union of 
Timber Workers, on strike in Washington 
and other northwestern States to resist 
wage reductions and non-union shop con- 
ditions, will be interested in this statement 
from the weekly bulletin of the National 
City Bank, 55 Wall street : 

"The lumber business is suffering from 
having been overestimated. The future 
value of timber was overdiscounted. It 
may be worth the values put upon it to 
owners who can carry it long enough, but 
it has not been worth those values to own- 
ers who are obliged to sell to meet cur- 
rent interest payments, and there are 
enough of the latter to spoil the lumber 
market for everybody. The people who 
have been prudent and are entirely able to 
take care of themselves have to suffer along 
with those directly responsible, and the 
whole country is affected, in a measure, by 
the depressed state of this industry. 

"Then, again, the greatest evil that has 
crept into the lumber industry has been 
the bonding of timber and sawmill proper- 
ties, and the customary overcapitalization. 

"Usually before a mill with bonds goes 
bankrupt it sacrifices its stumpage to meet 
its interest and sinking fund charges, and 
this stumpage is generally what is termed 
'the best logging chance.' This sacrificing 



of stumpage at any price to meet the in- 
terest and sinking fund charges has been, 
and is, the unsolvable problem confronting 
those who are interested in the rehabilita- 
tion of this great industry, for 'necessity 
drives,' and it is difficult for any association 
of lumbermen to talk reason with a lum- 
bering enterprise which is fighting for its 
life." 



Testing Disputes Act. 
The Canadian Industrial Disputes Act is 
undergoing a practical test in Vancouver. 
The electrical workers are determined to 
see whether any justice can be obtained for 
the workers under it. The working agree- 
ment the electrical workers had with the 
British Columbia Electrical Company ex- 
pired June 30. The men requested a re- 
newal of the old agreement. The company 
offered 10 per cent, reduction and unsatis- 
factory working conditions. Pending the 
negotiations the company discharged a 
number of electricians and the men believe 
that Section 56 of the Industrial Disputes 
Act has therefore been violated, in which 
it provides "that it shall be unlawful for 
any employer to declare or cause a lockout 
on account of any dispute prior to or dur- 
ing the reference of such dispute to a board 
of conciliation under the provisions of the 
act." Judge Shaw of Vancouver, dismissed 
the case in favor of the company. The 
electricians will carry the case to a higher 
court. 



PENDING AN EXPLANATION. 



No explanation accompanies the cable 
dispatch telling of the dismissal of 1,700 
employes engaged in land valuation in 
Great Britain. In the absence of such an 
explanation, judgment should be suspended, 
since it is possible that the action does not 
necessarily imply an interference with the 
work. But, it must be confessed, it is not 
quite unreasonable to suspect that the 
Liberals have surrendered to the nation's 
worst enemy — the landed interest. A defi- 
nite explanation can not long be withheld. 
Should it turn out to be a surrender, then 
the British people may as well realize that 
they have suffered a disaster, for which no 
victory on a foreign battlefield can compen- 
sate.— The Public. 



MASS MEETING AT SEATTLE. 
(Continued from page 7.) 



Merchant Marine, we witness the sale of one 
line of transpacific steamers on the pretense that 
such sale was forced and the vessels taken from 
the Pacific Ocean as a result of the more oner- 
ous conditions that are to be imposed on the 
owners by the application of this law. as if the 
law were to apply only on the Pacific, and the 
threatened transfer of another line to a foreign 
flag. 

The reflection on your intelligence and sin- 
cerity implied by the suggestion on the part of 
corporation mendicants and their kept press 
deters us from offering argument in refutation 
of the pretended conclusions drawn from these 
two incidents. 

We deny that the maintenance of a merchant 
marine depends cither upon the perpetuation of 
human slavery on the part of seamen or the 
reckless sacrifice of human life in the case of 
passengers or crew, and we call upon you, our 
lawmaking authorities, to pass the necessary 
law to enable our Government to lead the way 
in demonstrating this fact to the privilege-seek- 
ers and their kept press, by the establishment of 
a number of lines of merchant vessels to be 
owned and operated by and in the interest solely 
of the public 

We assert that among the things back of the 
attack on the Seamen's Law is the hope of se- 
curing, through such attack, the long-sought 
subsidy graft and the final defeat of the propo- 
sition for Government ownership of any part 
of the Merchant Marine. 

Seattle, Wash., Sept. 18. 1915. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



BURDENS BORNE BY LABOR. 

(By Robert Hunter.) 



Labor bears the burden of creating 
wealth by work and it bears the burden of 
creating dearth by idleness. 

When labor has the chance of filling the 
land with that fleeting thing called pros- 
perity it toils day and night. 

How gladly it then bears the burden of 
long hours, of over-time and of heavy toil. 

And the burden of toil seems heavy in 
the hour of prosperity but of all the 
burdens labor bears none are quite so terri- 
fying or so ruinous as the burden of idle- 
ness. 

In prosperity factories run over-time and 
the work of the day is carried into the 
night to fill the rush of orders. 

And then suddenly the mills, mines and 
factories close, the market is glutted, orders 
cease; for labor has produced more prod- 
ucts than men can sell. 

Then the tools are no longer worked 
and idle men and idle machines stand help- 
less, useless, unproductive face to face. 

And at such times millions of wage 
workers are unemployed and then the 
workers cry out in agony for wages, for 
food, for clothing and shelter. 

Their labor has produced more than 
plenty yet no man heeds their cry and 
they walk the streets, stand idly in the 
market places and tramp the land looking 
for some new master to employ them. 

The burden of toil is heavy but what 
is that to this new burden of idleness, the 
most terrifying and ruinous burden of all. 

"A man willing to work," said Carlyle, 
"and unable to find work is perhaps the 
saddest sight that fortune's inequality ex- 
hibits under this sun. 

"There is no horse willing to work but 
can get food and shelter; but not so this 
two-footed worker who has to seek and 
solicit occasionally in vain." 

And as labor cannot live except when 
wages are earned, idleness means want and 
dread uncertainty and hungry babies and 
anxious wives. 

And do you know that in this great land 
of ours as many as five million wage 
workers are sometimes unemployed? 

Even in one year of prosperity, so the 
Census tells us, over two million men were 
unemployed from two to four months in 
the year. 

And the statistics of one State inform us 
that sometimes one out of every three 
workers beg for a chance to work and beg 
in vain. 

And this burden that labor bears is the 
strangest thing in all this world. 

That strong, brawny men, capable of 
producing more wealth than they them- 
selves receive should be denied the op- 
portunity to produce that wealth! 

Was ever there anything before in the 
world like this? 

That shoeless bakers capable of pro- 
ducing bread should stand helplessly idle 
before hungry shoe-makers capable of pro- 
ducing shoes! 

That breadless sweat-shop workers capa- 
ble of producing clothes should stand idle 
and helpless before their ragged comrades 
capable of producing food ! 

I ask you was there ever anything before 
in the world like this? 

Yet there is no means known to this 
human society of ours whereby these work- 



ers can labor to feed and clothe each other. 

They must stand and wait. They know 
not how long, but long enough until the 
industrial machine begins its work again. 

They are cogs in that machine, able to 
work only when the machine works, forced 
into idleness, impoverishing idleness, when 
the machine ceases work. 

For in this day of ours these men have 
no fields or homes or tools of their own. 

They are dependents, the subjects of a 
system which asks them not when it will 
work or when it will not work. 

And so we see that labor bears not 
only the bruden of creating wealth by work 
it bears also that more distressing burden 
of creating dearth by idleness. 



PROFITS OUT OF WAR. 



In their quarterly report, the committee 
of the Todmorden Weavers' Association 
state : j 

"Lest we forget, let us again repeat that 
the average wages of the workers do not 
allow of a sufficient margin beyond the 
bare cost of living to allow of the possi- 
bility of making anything like adequate 
provision for periods the like of which the 
cotton trade is now experiencing, and 
whilst to-day the European war is the 
cause, to-morrow it may be one of number- 
less causes, any one of which the past has 
proved to be sufficient to throw the indus- 
trial machinery out of gear, when we have 
the same black cloud hanging over us, and 
Dame Charity rears her head and becomes 
the substitute for Justice, and the right or 
opportunity to earn our own livelihood 
under such conditions and for such reward 
as ought to be the common heritage of 
every honest working man and woman. 

"However horrible though the war is, 
and as we think, much more horrible will 
it become, it will not be without its useful 
lesson. We have seen how the nation' has 
assumed control of the whole concerns and 
departments, and how that control has 
tended to the steadying of our national 
life and food supplies ; we would ask the 
Government to go still further, and so ar- 
range the distribution of. the necessities 
of life as to make it impossible for any 
man or number of men to make them- 
selves richer as a consequence of the na- 
tional and individual difficulties. For the 
people's and the nation's safety, intern all 
those of the enemies' countrymen who are 
resident in our midst, but for God's sake 
either intern or hang those unscrupulous 
rascals who take advantage of their posi- 
tion and power to increase the cost of 
living of the people — these are our most 
despicable enemies, and ought not to be al- 
lowed to ply their nefarious practices." — 
Lancashire Cotton Factory Times. 



Labor's Economic Platform 



Chile and the Argentine Republic warred 
for years, wasted blood and treasure, over 
their boundary. Just before an impending 
battle the song of the angels of peace 
touched the heart of both nations. They 
settled their dispute. In commemoration of 
this, on the summit of the Andes, nearly 
three miles above the sea level, on the bor- 
der line fixed between the two nations, they 
built a colossal statue of Christ, cast from 
the bronze of old cannon, and on it is this 
inscription: "Sooner shall these mountains 
crumble into dust than Chileans and Argen- 
tines shall break this peace, which at the feet 
of Christ they have sworn to maintain." 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

nnnDnnnnnDnnDnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnDnnnnn 

International Seamen's Union 
of America 



(Continued from Page 5.) 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 58 Commercial St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1408% Western Ave., P. O. Box 
875. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 242 Flander St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 674. 



MARINE COOKS* AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 42 Market St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Pier No. 1, Room 63. P. O. 
Box 214. 

PORTLAND, Ore., Room 10, Bickle Bldg., 27% 
Second St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 49 Clay St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 



DDnDDDnDnDnaaDnDnannaDnnciDDDDDnDnD 

The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured by seamen at 
:my of the above-mentioned places; 
also at the headquarters of the 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Labor News. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Office Phone 
Elliott 135 



The trade union movement of 
Peterboro, Ontario, is protesting the 
city council's action in awarding a 
paving contract without including a 
nine-hour day provision. The un- 
ionists say city officials bound them- 
selves to insert this provision. The 
company is now paying laborers 
$10.50 for a sixty-hour week. 

More than 250 strike-breakers, 
picked up on the streets of Boston, 
are being used by the New Haven 
Railroad officials to replace its 150 
striking freight handlers at Bridge- 
port, Conn. Luxuriously equipped 
dining-cars are at the service of the 
company's new employes and they 
sleep in cars with well-appointed 
berths. 

Striking boiler makers and help- 
ers at the Standard Oil Company's 
plant in Baton Rouge, La., have 
voted to reject the company's propo- 
sition that they return to work. The 
management still refuses to reinstate 
discharged employes, which caused 
the lockout. The company declares 
the plant will be shut down indefi- 
nitely — probably. 

The eagle eye of President Ru- 
dolph Stern of the National Marine 
Lamp Company at Forestville, Conn., 
discovered several employes agitating 
for an eight-hour day and wage in- 
creases. President Stern took in- 
stant action and dismissed these agi- 
tators forthwith. He was surprised 
when practically his entire force 
walked out with their discharged 
fellows. 

With many mills working day and 
night to fill millions of dollars' 
worth of orders which are flowing in 
from all sections of the United 
States and from abroad, September 
has opened in the Kensington, Pa., 
textile district under booming condi- 
tions. Many mills have enough or- 
ders to keep them busy until the 
latter part of 1916, and most of them 
have been obliged to establish night 
shifts to get the work out on time. 

More than 400 drivers and chauf- 
feurs employed by sixteen of Bos- 
ton's largest milk concerns have 
voted to leave the time for enforcing 
their wage demands in the hands 
of a committee. These demands 
call for an increase of $1 a week to 
all members of the union, which 
would bring the wage of route fore- 
man to $23, of drivers to $20 and of 
helpers to $15 a week. The agree- 
ment under which they are now 
working expired September 1. An- 
other demand which the committee 
was instructed to press is for a daily 
balancing of the accounts of the 
drivers, instead of by the week or 
month as is now the practice of 
some firms. 

A three years' contract with em- 
ployers has been signed by the New 
Westminster, British Columbia, Ty- 
pographical Union. The hours re- 
main the same, 7 l / 2 on newspapers 
and 8 in job offices. The news- 
paper scale is $30 and $33, and the 
job scale is $27.50. The following 
scale for apprentices is included in 
the contract: Ten dollars per week 
for the first six months of the third 
year, $12.50 per week for the last 
six months of the same year, $15 per 
week for the first six months of 
the fourth year, $17.50 per week for 
the last six months of the fourth 
year, $20 per week for the first six 
months of the fifth year, and $22.50 
per week for the last six months of 
their apprenticeship. 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-date methods in Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy. 

Compasses adjusted. 

PIER NO 1. Established 1890 SEATTLE, WASH. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
8EATTLE. WASH. 

~AUlSH^^ 

CORNER WESTERN AVENUE AND 

SENECA STREET 

New Building — New Furniture 

26 cents and up per Day 

Special Rates Per Week 

FREE BATHS 

PETER DESMORE, Proprietor 

SEATTLE 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 

Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 

Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 



Pho.ie Main 1202 

L. V. WESTERMAN 

CLOTHIER 

FURNISHER and HATTER 

ALASKA OUTFITTER 

220-222 First Avenue South, at Main 
SEATTLE 



Eureka, Cal. 



MERCANTILE LUNCH 

Is the place for a good and quick service 

233 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 

Teddy ® Hagan 

Proprietor! 



^^^^^^^A^^^^^V^^VWWWW^ •N^%^> 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 



Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 



612 Fourth St. 



Eureka, Cal. 



BONNEY-WATSON CO. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium in 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 

NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH 
Four year9 Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor in New York Nautical College. 

Room 4187 ARCADE BUILDING 

Next Room to Masters, Mates and Pilots 

Association 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer in 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire- Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofftce, letters addressed in care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mail forwarded 
during that period, they should notify 
. nt to hold mail until arrival. 

Abrahamsen, Mann, Emil 

Ilalptan Moyer, Wm. 

Andersen, Hjalmar Martensen, IriB.oald 

Andersen, P. T. Martensen, Knist 

Rerntsen. Bernt Martinsohn P. A. 

I '.lower, Geo. Mathlsen, Martin 

Bucknam, J. W. Mathlsen. Sigurd 

Carlson. Herbert McNiell. Ross 
Chrishansen, TrygoeMoen. Tryger 

Christensen. Anton Mortensen, .1. H. 

Chudelow, Geo. Mikk. 



Edvords, John 

is, John 
Engebretsen, Ed. 
Edverdsen, Anton 
Edson, Frank 
Frlsch, Peter D. 
Gilbert, Arthur 
Glademo. Lars 
Gundersen, Peter 
Gustafson, Karl 
Hansen. Alex M. 
Hansen, John 
Hatton, Pete 
Hughes. W. L. 
Hansen. C. 
Howard, Geo. 
Jakobson, Walde- 

mar 
.Tansewitch, John 
Jensen. Oscar 
Jensen. S. 
Johnson. Kd. 
Johnson, Emil 
.Torcensen. Fred 
.Tnrobsen, Tenglls 
Jon an son. Wm. 
Kalning. Jacob 
Larsen. Albin 
Larsen, John 
Larsen. Pete 
Larsen, K. -1560 
T.arsen. L. A. 
Larson. Olaf 



Moore, C. R. 
Nass, T. M. 
Nelsen. Osear J. 
Nohereit, Gust 
Nygaard. oiuf 
Olsen. C. E. 
Olsen, Edwin 
Olsen, O. 
Olson, J. E. 
Olson, E. -OfiK 
Olsen. Harald 
Olsson, C. 
Pestoff, Sam 
Petersen, A. -1223 
Petersen. Hugo 
Petterson. llarrv 
rvrersen. Gnrl M. 
Ouains, Nick 
Quigle. R. B. 
Ouigley, Tom 
Ramberg. Barney 
Renstrom. A. G. 
Roos, Axel E. 
Role. Filing 
Rehwelstous. W. 
Shankat. Hans 
Slmmingh.Um. G. 
Speller, Henry 
Stone. C. L. 
Teichert. Karl 
Thomsen. Finar 
Thompson. Fete 
Torlusen. G. T. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY <£ YOUNG 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

— or — 

A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 
EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



f/VVWWSi'WVWWWV^WVWV^-VWWWWl 



SAILORS' OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS, 
SAILORS* SINGLETS 

Everything Union Made 

PAGE & SCHWARTZ 

Cor. Second and E Sts., Eureka, Cal. 



Lelrdman, C. H. O. TTrsln. Johannes 
Leonard, John Veekenstedt, Billle 

Lundberg. C. Waagen. C. O. 

L'itten. Theo. Wall. W. 

Mlones, John Wetland. John 



Tacoma Letter List. 



Cords, W. A. 
Evertsen. Olof 
Farrell. William 
Haugan. Arthur 



Olsen. Martin E. 
Paterson. John 
Person, Fritz Leo- 
nard 



Johannsen. ChristlanSchmidt. Louis 
LInea, W. Thomas. Paul 

Line. Wictor T'llman. Emil 

Murphy, Danial 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



Carl Kristianson, who shipped on 
the bark "Nuanu" in September, 

1912, from Honolulu to San Pedro, 
was on the bark "Allen" and 
schooner "Repeat" previously. Any- 
body knowing his whereabouts please 
notify his mother, Mrs. Anna Kris- 
tianson, Majornas, Route 6, M. 27, 
Lilla B. Nystrama St., Gothenborg, 
Sweden. 5-13-14 

Frank Melson, who went as fire- 
man on the S. S. "Maye" from Phila- 
delphia to New Orleans, in May, 

1913, is inquired for by his mother. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify Mrs. G. W. Paruin, 
4309 Westminster avenue, W. Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

George Barrett, who, on November 
12, 1912, left the ship "Port Logan" 
at Newcastle, of which he was an 
apprentice, is inquired for by his 
mother, his father having died. Any- 
one knowing the whereabouts of this 
lost son please at once communi- 
cate with Amelia Barrett, 1 Wood- 
land Place, East Greenwich, Lon- 
don, England. 3-3-15 

Otto E. Bickel and John Sherman 
Bickel, brothers, who have not been 
heard of for many years, are in- 
quired for by their sister. They are 
both tall, light complexioned, and blue 
eyes. Any information regarding 
their whereabouts will be highly ap- 
preciated. Please address Miss Laura 
Bickel, 1591 East Ninety-third street, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 4-14-15 

Knut Jensen No. 5018, a member 
of the Lake Seamen's Union, a 
native of Denmark, is inquired for 
by his wife, Lieschen Jensen, of 
Sangemunde, A/Elbe Ostenerweg, F. 
Germany. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify the Lake 
Seamen's Union, 133 Clinton street, 
Milwaukee, Wis. 4-14-15 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. SWANSON, Prop. 



Eureka, Cal., Letter List 



I Ion! 1 1 

Eriksen, Anton 

Kj rks 

M Keating, R. 



Lawrence, Harry 

Xils 
ii, l-'i edi Ick x. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Johan Hilmar Hansen, a seaman 
who was last heard from in Seattle, 
Wash., in 1911, is inquired for by his 
father, Anton Hansen, Nygaten 34, 
Moss, Norway. 5-13-14 

Alex McDonald, formerly of Dun- 
dee, Scotland, who has not been 
heard of for 22 years, but is thought 
to be sailing on the Pacific Coast, 
is inquired for by Jas. Perry, 30 
Bridge End, Buckpool, Buckie, Eng. 

5-13-14 

Fred Riley, a colored seaman, last 
heard from at Genoa, Italy, and at 
other times from ports in Australia 
and at Liverpool, England, is sole 
heir to his mother's estate. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts kindly no- 
tify Mr. John E. Selkirk, Attorney- 
at-Law, 100 Erie Co. Bank Bldg., 
Buffalo, N. Y. 6-24-14 

Henry Smallwood, a native of New 
York, is inquired for by his mother. 
Anyone knowing his present where- 
abouts please notify the following 
address: Mary Smallwood, Academy 
of the Holy Name, 200 Fair Oaks 
Ave., Pasadena, Cal. 7-29-14 

Alfred Petersen Hilland, a native of 
Bergen, Norway, age about 44, is in- 
quired for by his brother, Randolf 
Petersen. Any one knowing his 
whereabouts please notify Sam An- 
derson, address 100 Steuart St., San 
Francisco, Cal. 7-22-14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 



Portland, Ore. 
WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 
For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 

GDaDnDDnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnDDDD 



NEW AND SECOND HAND 
CLOTHING 

WEINER'S BARGAIN 
HOUSE 

Shoes, Hats, Suitcases 

Furnishings and Tools 

French Dry and Steam Cleaning 

UNION SHOP 

35 NORTH THIRD STREET 

Corner of Cauch PORTLAND, ORE. 



P. ROSBNSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers in 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnside, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. Main 8295 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 



SQUARE DEAL 

RESTAURANT 

Best Meals on the East Side 

$5.50 Meal Ticket for $5.00 

Phone East 406 

371 BURNSiDE STREET 

PORTLAND - - OREGON 

CON. SILVER, Mgr. 



Willamette Cigar Store 

H. SORENSEN, Proprietor 

" CIGARS, TOBACCO, 

CONFECTIONERY, FRUIT AND 

SOFT DRINKS 

Corner Front and Burnside, 

Portland, Ore. 

Portland, Or., Letter List. 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 
DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 
no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treat. 



Home 


N 


ews. 





VOTE AGAINST PROHIBITION 



DEMAND 



PERSONAL LIBERTY 



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Union 

MADE 

Seer 




"Ale 

AND 

Porter! 



B 

□ 

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IN CHOOSING WHAT YOU g 

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THIS IS OUR LABEL -«•-„ „*«.„ □ 

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p£&h Of America ricV | 

COPTRICHT &TRADE MARK REGISTERED 1903 j 



WILL DRINK 

Ask for this Label when 

purchasing Beer, Ale 

or Porter, 

As a guarantee that it is 

Union Made 



Aberdeen, Wash. 



Bese, P. 

Bernahrdsen. Chas. 
Bjornlund, Axel 
Bugge, Mr. 
Christensen, H. P. 
Decas, O. 
Dolany, Willie 
Edstrom, John 
Ekberg, Hugo 
Fernandez, Frank 
Geiger, Joe 
Hecker, Wm. 
Halbeck, J. O. 
Holmstrom, Chas. A. 
Henriks, Waldemar 
Ingelbrigsten, O. 
Jensen, Christ 
Jensen, Wm. 
Jegstrup. Harold 
Johnson, Nils 
Jonsson, Karl 
Knopp, Fritz 
Kristiansen, Wm. 
King, J. L. 
Kelly, Patric 
Kjer, Magnus 
Knudsen, Richard E. 
Larsen, H. 
Leonhard, George 
Letchford, A. 
Lindblad, Konrad 
Lindberg, A. C. 
Lindholm, John 
Loescher, Joseph 
Miller, E. 
McKeating, R. 
Munchmeier, H. 
Miller. Andy M. 
Morgan, Tim 



Muller, P. 
Metts, John 
Moller, L. D. 
McConnell, David S. 
Mark, Thorwald 
Meckermann, Ernst 
Neuling, George 
Nielsen, H. -1253 
Olsen, Arthur 
Ohlsson, J. W. 
Osterberg, Henry 
Oglive, Wm. A. 
Palm, P. A. 
Pedersen, J. A. 

-1515 
Perkins, Paul 
Peterson, M. 
Rabel, John 
Reskran, George 
Rlnkel, H. 
Rimmer, Chas. 
Schneider, J. 
Schneider, Fritz 
Swanson, Emil 
Soderlund, Uno 
Sorensen, Jorgen 
Shea, Oscar 
Schacht, H. 
Schultz, John N. 
Selin, Joe 
Salmelin, H. 
Saarinen, W. 
Tuhkanen, J. J. 
Urso, Geozzep 
Vinx, H. 
Windblad, M. 
Wheatcroft, L. E. 
White, Harry 
Westengren, C. W. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Albers, Geo. L. 
Andersen, -1118 
Arntzen, W., reg. 
Andersen, Andrew 
Arnell, John 
Burmelster, T. 
B A If. 

Bjorkhind, G. 
Bowen, J. J. 
Davis, Frank 
Eriksson, -333 
Evensen, ECrist 
Gustafsson, Chas. 
Gronros, Oswald 
< rueno, Piei re 
Hansen, 

Hansen. Ilnll'dan 

Holmroos, W. 
Hansen. Ove Max 
Hylander, Gustaf 
Jacobson, J. 
Kallas, August 
Kerr, Wm. 
Knappe, Adolph 
Kristiansen, Nils 
Kustel, V. J. 
Ladwig, otto 
Ludtke, Emil 
Machado, Henry 
Munsen, Fred 



Nielsen, N. C. 
Nilsen, -1054 
Nilsen, llarry 
Nordgren, Chas. 
Peitson, J. 
Peters, Walter 
Andrew 
-in, Karl 

Petersen, J. 
Peterson, Nels 
Risen ius, Sv"en 
Rundblad, Oscar 
Schmidt, I leinrlch 
Simensen, isak 
Schefi hit, Bei i 
Thorn, A. L. -70 

es, II. C. 
Thome, John 
Thompson, S. K. 
Udby, Harold 

Weinman. John 
Wiksti n. Arvid 
Wilson, John 
Walder, Olsen N. 

Packages. 
Glazer, v. 
Gorgensen, Olaf 
1 1: us. n. John 
MacGuire, O. F. 
i s. W. S. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers,. always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



HU0TARI a CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



When In Aberdeen Trade at 
BEE HIVE 

Very best union made Hickey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, 
Shoes, Underwear, Beddings, Tobac- 
cos, and notions for seafaring men. 
NYMAN BROS. 
304 South F St., Aberdeen, Wash. 
Near Sailors' Union Hall 
Open Evenings 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



TO LET 

Very Desirable, Light 
and Roomy 

Stores and Basement 

— in the — 

Maritime Hall Building 

— on — 

49-59 CLAY STREET 

Between Embarcadero & Drumm Sts., 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Apply to I. N. HYLEN, 49 Clav St. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

I war Westerberg, age about 50, 
sailing second mate on some steam 
schooner on the Pacific Coast, is in- 
quired for by Gus Englund. Any in- 
formation regarding the above named 
will be gladly received at 214 Jack- 
son street, San Francisco, Cal. 

1-27-15 

Theodore Krakan, last heard of in 
September 1911, at New Orleans, La., 
is inquired for by his mother. Any 
one knowing his whereabouts please 
notify Mrs. Ad. Krakan, Langenvehm 
38 I, Hamburg 22, Germany.— 8-25-15. 



Port Townsend, Wash. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union-Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

Water Street, Port Townsend 

Next door to Waterman & Katz 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Ingvald Andreas Hansen, alias 
Andrew Hansen, a native of Nor- 
way, age about 36; tall, dark; last 
heard of July, 1905. His address 
then was, Andrew Hansen, Karluk, 
Kodiak Island, Alaska. He is in- 
quired for by his mother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify Staff Captain Robert Smith, 
district officer, native work, Alaska, 
Box 925, Wrangell. 4-3-15 

Wilhelm Ekelund, a native of 
Sweden, is inquired for by his 
brother, Axel Ekelund, New Harbor 
Hotel, Drumm street, San Francisco, 
Cal. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify the above ad- 
dress. 3-10-15 

Patrick McFee, who was cook on 
board the schooner "Robert Henry" 
on a voyage to Mexico last year, is 
inquired for by the U. S. Shipping 
Commissioner, at San Francisco, Cal. 

9-15-15 

George Alexander Sharman, a na- 
tive of Brooklyn, N. Y. About 28 
years of age, height 5 feet 9 inches, 
supposed to have sailed on the Great 
Lakes in 1907, is inquired for by 
M. L. Kinvan, 1211 Mosher street, 
Baltimore, Md. 7-14-15 

Carl Janson, age 36, born in Was- 
tervik, Sweden; last heard of in Seat- 
tle six years ago. Anyone knowing 
his address please communicate with 
Erika Askenberg, 2280 86th street, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

George Alfred Hall, last heard of 
on the Sch. "Sehome" in June, 1913, 
will please communicate with his 
brother, Walter Hall. Address 790 
18th street, Oakland, Cal. 

William McGrail, of Baltimore, 
Md.. who sailed on the Atlantic and 
Gulf Coasts as cook for a number of 
years, is inquired for by hi<= brother, 
George McGrail, 603 Decatur street. 
New Orleans, La. 



After dropping on September 1 to 
$4.48 in foreign exchange markets, 
the English pound sterling rallied, 
with its value fluctuating since then, 
but did not again fall to the point 
noted. 

Elizabeth Gurley Flynn went to 
Paterson, N. J., to make an address 
on September 4 to striking silk mill 
workers. Chief of Police Bimson, 
with a force of detectives, compelled 
her to go back to New York. 

By employing rigid economy the 
Bureau of Engraving and Printing at 
Washington is said to have met the 
scarcity of dyestuffs resulting from 
the war in Europe and now has 
available enough pigments to color 
the Government's money and stamps 
for six months to come. 

A call for an International Con- 
gress of Women to meet in San 
Francisco on November 1 to 5 has 
been issued by National Council of 
Women of the United States. The 
program will consist of discussion of 
education, philanthropy, civics, social 
and economic welfare, federation of 
spiritual forces and co-operation with 
the Federal Government. No discus- 
sion on the war will be permitted. 

The $325,000 bonds voted for mu- 
nicipal wharves and docks, schools 
and streets at Orange, Texas, has 
been approved by the State of 
Texas. The plans for the erection 
of the wharves and docks in the 
southern part of the city, which are 
to be constructed at an approximate 
cost of $150,000, have been com- 
pleted, and so soon as the bonds are 
sold and bids have been advertised 
for, work is expected to start. 

Reductions in the rates on anthra- 
cite coal from the Eastern mines to 
tidewater recently ordered by the In- 
terstate Commerce Commission will 
not go into effect until December 1. 
According to the original decision of 
the Commission in this case, the 
Commission gave the roads notice 
that they must put new rates in 
effect by October 1. It is under- 
stood that the object of the post- 
ponement is to give the anthracite 
railroads an opportunity to appeal to 
the courts for a reversal of the de- 
cision of the Commission. 

There was a big decrease in cotton 
shipments from Wilmington, N. C, 
for the past year as compared with 
1914. Exports for the cotton year 
ending August 1, 1915, amounted to 
248,945 bales, which was a decrease 
of 104,387 bales from the previous 
year. There are now stored in Wil- 
mington 32,890 bales of cotton, held 
by cotton exporters and by mer- 
chants. Some of this cotton was 
purchased over a year ago when 
the merchants and corporations, both 
North and South, sought to aid the 
Southern cotton farmer by buying 
up a certain number of bales. 

The New York State Constitutional 
Convention adjourned finally on Sep- 
tember 10, having been in session 
since April 6. It adopted 33 articles 
and amendments. The revised docu- 
ment goes to the people to be voted 
on for adoption or rejection as a 
whole in November. The final vote 
submitting it was 118 to 33. In voting 
against it William Barnes protested 
against the refusal to let voters | 
(in each amendment separately, and 
in reference to the clause allowing 
palliative legislation he said: "I can 
not by my vote do anything to aid 
the cause of State Socialism." 
ii suffrage will be separately 
voted on. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




The steamer ''Silver Wings," 
bound from New York to Archangel, 
which is a total wreck at Sable 
Island, is of 2,804 tons, built in 1904, 
and valued at £36,000. 

The ex-revenue cutter "Woodbury" 
arrived in Boston harbor recently in 
tow of the tug "Neptune," from 
Portland, on her last voyage. She is 
now the property of Thomas Butler 
& Sons. After being stripped she 
will be burned at Governor's Island 
to get the metal in her. 

Authority for the receiver of the 
Eastern Steamship Corporation to 
pay priority claims aggregating $305,- 
000 with interest at the rate of 5 per 
cent, from November 1, 1914, to 
September 1, 1915, has been given 
by Judge William L. Putnam in the 
United States District Court at Port- 
land. 

The fate of twenty-two members 
of the crew of the Italian sailing 
ship "Ciampa," which was aban- 
doned 500 miles southeast of the 
island of Fernando de Noronha in 
the South Atlantic August 16th, is 
in doubt, according to a cablegram 
from Pernambuco, Brazil. Eight 
members of the crew, who aban- 
doned the vessel when she took fire 
at sea, reached the island safely after 
fifteen days in an open boat. 

With her lumber cargo saved, but 
otherwise a total loss, the bark 
"William T. Lewis," owned by Mind, 
Rolph & Co., of San Francisco, is 
now at Bantry Bay, according to 
news received by the marine de- 
partment of the Chamber of Com- 
merce. So badly was the vessel 
riddled by the shots fired by the 
German submarine which attacked 
her that her hull is a sieve and her 
masts and rigging are all shot away. 
The "Lewis" left the Pacific Coast 
last March with a full cargo of pine 
destined for England, and had nearly 
reached her destination when at- 
tacked by the German. 

The Department of Commerce re- 
cently announced the following 
changes in the U. S. Steamboat In- 
spection Service: Andrew J. Savage, 
local inspector at Boston, and James 
McGrath, local inspector at Cleve- 
land, have resigned. W. K. Martin 
has been appointed local inspector 
at New York; Robert Clark, assist- 
ant inspector at Boston, and W. F. 
Oilman, inspector at Boston, suc- 
ceeding Savage. Whitmore Hall has 
been appointed local inspector of 
boilers at Galveston; Philip J. Shaw, 
to a same position at Providence, 
R. I., and Harry Lord, at Seattle. 
All the men now occupy other po- 
sitions in the service. 

The reported sinking by a Ger- 
man submarine 12 miles outside of 
the mouth of the Gironde of the 
French steamship "Bordeaux" shows 
that the underwater craft of the 
German Navy have considerably ex- 
tended the scope of their operations, 
for heretofore no vessel has been 
attacked so far away from the North 
Sea German bases. This report, if 
true, might confirm the rumor circu- 
lated some time ago that German 
submarines had a secret base on the 
coast of the Iberic Peninsula for at- 
tacks upon shipping in the Bay of 
Biscay. The "Bordeaux" was well- 
known on this side, having for years 
been operated by the Compagnie 
Generale Transatlantique in fast car- 
go service from New York to French 
ports. She was of 4,530 tons, built 
in 1891 and was formerly the Wilson 
liner "Francisco." 



SPECIAL NOTICE! 

Call or send for your Advertised Mail and 
Packages as early as possible. 



San Francisco Letter List. 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
L'niun Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail Is advertised In 
these columns should at once notify 
1. M. Holt, Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 



Anderson, Fritz 
Anderson, Geo. 
Anderson, Gust 
Anderson, H. E. 
Anderson, Hilding 
Anderson, John C. 
Anderson, Joseph 
Anderson, Oscar 
Anderson, Thos. 
Anderson, Walter 
Andersson, K. E. 

-1323 
Andersson, Victor 
Andreasen, Karl 
Andreassen, H. 

-1477 



Abhors, Arne 
Abnieyer, Henry 
Acorn, Albert 
Adams, Hugo 
Aha, Jack 
Ahlfors, Arthur 
Ahokos, Ilmori 
Akman, Joseph 
Aimer, John G. 
Andersen, Alfred 

Dial 
Andersen, H. J. 

-1620 
Andersen, John 
Andersen, N. -1649 
Andersen, Otto 

Andersen. Kmanuel Andstrom, Y. 
Andersen, Henry Antonsen, H. -1372 
Andersen, V. -!Ui2 Antonsen, H. -17S3 
Anderson, A. -1344 Antonson, Viktor 
Anderson, Chr. -1765Ashlund, Jas. H. 
Anderson. Ed Augustin, Hermann 

Anderson, E. L. Azevedo, Manuel T. 

Anderson, Ernst 



Backman, Axel 
Backman, Aug 
Hickman, Paul 
Bakkenson, P. J. 
Bakker, Haakon 
Han. Martin 
Karrell, George 
Bartsch, W. 
Baxter, Ed 
Behrendt. Carl 
Bensen, I. -2164 
Benter, H. 

Berggren, I. L. 
list. Win. 
Berklind, Gus 
Berry, David J. 
B. J. 
Bertelsen, Kristlan 

-en, Olof 
Beyerle, Rupert 
Biedeman, Aug. 
Bllke, E. -2049 
Caen, P. 

Calnan, George I. 
Galson, Fred 
Campbell, D. C. 
Campbell, 8. 

11. Martin 
Cariera, Peter 
Carlson, C. O. 
Carlson, C. R. 
Carlson, Joe 
Carlson, Martin 

on, John 
Carlstrom, Claes 
Catt, Frederick 
CHlan. John 
Christensen, Alfred 
Dahlkvist. Fred 
Daly. John 
Daniel, J. C. 
Danlelson, David 
Danielson. Eric 

William 
De Baer, Harry 
Dehler, Alfred 
Denis, I. 
Earling, Gus 
Ebersole, R. E. 
Kchlin, Lester W. 
Eckart, T. G. 
Eckstrand, Frank 
Eckstrom, George 
Edolf, C. 
Eisenhart, N. 
Elenlus, Axel 
Eliassen, E. -396 
Eliassen, Sigurd 
Fagerli, Ott 
Falcon, M. 
Fane, James 
Ferguson, B. 
Ferguson, J. 
Fitzgerald, Wm. 
Fltzpatrlek. Potrick 
Flinkenberg, Uno 
Follan. Thomas 
Forde. S. C. 
Foss, John 
Gabrielsen, Peder 
Gallagher, Jas. 
Gart, George 
Gerner, Hans 
Gilbert, A. 
Gilholm, Albin 
Gorden. George 
Granberg, Fred 
Grant, Dave 
Grantstrom, Nestor 
Gronthal. Arthur 
Gross, Ernest 
Gudmundsen, B. 

I laak. Ueinhold 

k, O. 
Hall, H. 

Halvarsen, Henry 
Hammergren, Oscar 
Ilannus. M. 
Hansen. Charlie 
Hansen, C. M. 
Hansen, P., -1735 
Hansen. Hans M. 
Hansen. Hans O. 
Hansen, H. C. 
Hansen, H. P. 
Hansen, Jeremiaa 
Hansen, K. -967 
Hansen, L. P. 
Hansen, M. -968 
Hansen. Norkard M. 
Hansen, Thomas 

rold 
Hanson Henrlk 
TTnss. Wilhelm 
Hauan. Knrl 
Hawkins. F. 
Ikonem. Joe 
Ingebretsen. Olaf 



Billington, Martin 
Blume, Earnest 
Blum, Ernest 
Boro, Severin S. 
Bowman, Jack 
Boy, Geo. 
Brandt, B. 
Bredemeyer, Elmer 

H. 
Brown, George 
Brown, Jno. 
Brown, William 
Brunst, Frank 
Bruum, Aksel 
Buaas, Tomas 
Buckly, J. J. 

. Charles 
Burke, Andrew 
Bush, H. 8. 
Byglfn, Ovia O. 
Byloff, Charles 

Christensen, Hans 
Christensen. Louis 
Christiansen, L. P. 
Claus, John R. C. 
Clausen, Cha 
Clausen, Chr. 
Clausen, I. 
Clifford, J. 
Cook, Harry 
Collier. H. S. 
Collins, E. F. 
Comstedt, Ernst 
Corlon, R. A. 
Costantinos. Lay 
Countedt, Ernest 

I lerengowski, Julius 
Dewetrak, C. 
Dixen. Ben 
Dixon, John 
Douglas. G. Sam. 
Doyle, Wm. 
Dracar, Ed. 
Dreyer, Jack 

Ellefsen, Otto 
Ellingsen, Fred 
Engelhardt, Ferdi- 
nand 
Erlckson, E. R. 
Eritkson, George 
Eriokson, John 
Ericson, Sigurd 
Ertman, Eskil 
Evansen, Louis 
Evertsen, Olaf 
Foster, Chas. 
Fredholm, Chas. J. 
Fredriksen, Berger 
Fredrlckson. F. 
Frilieig, Frank 
Friedrich, H. 
Frig, W. 
Fritseh. Leonard 
Funk, Burno 
Furlong, Peter 

Gudmundsen, L. 
Gumas, Nicholas 
Gundersen, Kristlan 
Gundersen, L. I. 
Gunderson, G. A. 
Gunderson, J. C. 
Gunderson, M. 
Gunther. Hans 
Gunvaldsen, I. 
GuBtaison, Gus 
Gustavsen, O. 
Guthre, R. 
Gutman. C. 

Hedenskog, John 
Hein, M. 

, Charles F. 
Helln, John 
Helin. Paul 
Helsten, Gustaf 
Helberger. M. 
Henriksen, T. 
Hermansson, Gustaf 
Higgins. F. 
Hilderbranch. A. 
Hofgnard. 1 1 
Holberg. Oluf 
TTolmquist. F. 
Holm. Arthur 
Holm. Karl 

Chas. P. 
Hoist. R. 
Hord. Charlie 
Hoseth. Christian 
Hoversen. Carl 
Hrelja. J. -229R 
Huhertz. Emil 
Hubner, c. f. W. 
Insunso. Francisco 



■ lade, Hans 

;-n, Alfred 
. E. a. - _: _: 1 7 
Jaasson, Jonas 
Jar< inski, Feiiks 
Jenkins, F. 
Jensen, Curl 
Jensen, C. 
Jensen, 11. 
Jensen, Hans 
Jensen, Haaiord 
Jensen, Henry 
Jensen, Jack 
Jensezi, Knud 
Jensen, Thoyus 
Jespersen, Christ 
Johansen, Carl J. 

ivaleva, Gustaf 
Kallio, Jonn -346 
Ivuilberg, Arvld 
ivailsoii, \\ iktor 
Kayser, Chas. 
KinlocK, Win. 
Kipste, Chas. 
Klrrowsky, Adam 
Klebingat, F. 

nan, Frank 
Klepzig, Otto 
Klotzke, otto 
jvnoul, Louie 

Luakso, Frank 

Ihos. E. 
I.ala, August 

Larsen, a. C. 
Larsen, J. -1386 
Larsen, John 



Johansen, Fritz 
Johanson. Edward 
Johanson, Nathaniel 
Johannson, Ails 
Johansson, E. A. 
Johansson, J. it. 
Johnsen, C. B. 
Johnson, A. -2077 
Johnson, C. J. 
Johnson, E. G. -227 
Johnson, Eric 
Johnson, Henry 
Johnson, John 
Jones, iierthon 
Jorgensen, Fred 
Jungberg, L. 
Junge, Heinrich 

Knappe, Adolph 
Knudsen, Daniel 
Kolbe, Albin 
Konslatin, Anist 
Kolsted, A. 
Korner, Fred 
Koso, Petter 
Krishjan, Karl 
Kristensen, K. D. 
Kristiansen, Jakob 
Kruk, J. 
Kulin, John 

Leverridge, H. 
Lewald, Harry A. 
Lewis, Robt. W. 
Ligoski, Joe 
Lindenkranlz, Chas. 
Lindh, Nils V. 
Larsen, Julius Liljendahl, Ludvig 

Larsen, L. K. Llndroth, Erik 

Link, Geo. 
Li- ingston E J ward 

J. 
Ljung, Gustaf 
Lonau, John 
Loren, A. L. 
Loreotsen, Karl 
Luberg, W. 
Lundberg, Charles 
Lundgren, Colmar 
Lundstrom, John 
Lunsmann, Henry 
Lutjen, Valdeman 

Mattson, J. 
McLaughlin, M. 
McMahon, Jack 
Meislahn, H. 
Melba, Chas. 
Menk, Billy 
Mertensen, Henry 
Meyer, Ernest 
Meyer, F. 
Meyers, Max 
Miller, Winford 
Moore, Albert 
Morgen, L. 
Muller, Thorn 
Murphy, J. 

Nilsen, Hans L. 
Nilsen, O. E. 
Nllssen, Harry 
Nilsson, HJalmar 
Nonberg, Gustaf 
Nor, Niels 
Nordlof, Sigurd 
Norman. Olaf 
Norris, N. A. 
Norton, Edgar 
Norton, Emil 
Nunner, Albert A. 
Nurme, Victor 
Nyrnan, Oskar 
Nyross, Julius 



Larsen, Pete 

Larson, Allied 
Larson, S. G. 
Larssun, Karl 
Larsson, K. E. 
Larsson, Ragnar 
Langworth, H. E. 
Latz, C. 
Laursen, Chris. 
Lawson, J K 
am, Mace 
Leelkaln, Martin 
Leirevaag, H. J. 
Leroen, Lars 

Macke, David 
Macomber, H. B. 
Maki, lvar 
Malland, O. 
Manse. Peter 
Marmion, J. 
Marqueis, Frank 
Ala: tens, 11.. -1892 
.Martens. H. H. F. 
Martenstn, J. C. 

2191 
Martin, A. 
Martin, H. 
Mathiassen, Sigurd 
Malta, 1 1 unibei to 
Mattson, Charles 

Nedsen, John B. 
Nelsen, Albin C. 
Nelson. Albert 
Nelson, Alvln ■ 
Nelson, C. 
Nelson, Fred 
in, John 
Nelson, John B. 
Nerby, Kristlan 
Nicolaisen, Carl 
Nielsen, Edwin N. 
Nielsen. H. F. -1195 
Nielsen, Nils 
Nielsen, Valdemar 
Niemeyer, Oscar 



oberg, Oscar 
O'Brien, R. F. 
Ohland, Chas. 
Oleman, Henry 

Albert 
Olsen, B. O. L. 
Olsen, C, 1315 
Olsen, Charles A. 
Olsen, F. -1249 
Olsen, G. W. 
Olsen, J. A. 

Olsen, John Arthur Olsson, Dolph 
Olsen, John Olsson, Eric 

Olsen, Jorgen Ollsson, Carl 

Olsen, O. -1283 Orlllng, Gust 

Olsen, O. Osterbolm, J. W. 

Olsen, O. B. Owen. Fred 

Olsen, O. G. J. -1189 



Olsen, Ole, -1047 
Olson, C. E. 
Olson, C. O. -705 
Olson, J. 
Olson, Morten 
Olson, Nick 
Olson, P. 
Olsson, Adrian 
Olsson, A. W. 
Olsson. B. O. 

-1L"<I 



s. 



Para, E. H. 
Paul, George 
Paulman, Geo. 
Paulsen. Aksel 
Paulsen, N. 
Paultin. Martin 
Pedersen, Carl 
Pedersen, H. -1560 
Pedersen, .1. A. -151! 
Pedersen. L. -1167 

in. P. -896 
Pedersen, W. G. 
Pel ton a, W. 
Pergher, Charles 
Persson. John 
Peters, Wm. 
Petersen, Hugo 
Qulgley, Robert E. 
Raalsen, F. 
Raaum, Henrlk 
Randolph, J. 8. 
Rank. W. 
Rasmussen. Emil 
Rnsmussen. J. A. 
Relnhardt, Werner 

old, Ernst 
Reinink. Herman 
ck. I li. 
Robert 
Retail. Otto 
Rlckes, G. 8. 
nimmer, C. M. 

!sen, Ingo 
Sanders, Robert 
Sanders. S. 
Sanderson. Alfred 
Sandstrom. Ivar 
Sass, John 
Saunders. .Tnmes 
Savage. Roland 
Saxhy. C. 11. 
Schachte, A. O. 
Schaffier, Hugo 

enz, Charles 
Schmehl. Jas. P. 



Petersen, Niels 

Petersen, O. -159 

Petersen, Otto 

Petersen, Peter 

Petersen, 

Peterson, 

Peterson, 

Peterson. 

Petersson 

PInklert, 



C. V. 
L. -1389 
Oscar 
Tom 
Conrad 
C B. 



Plom. Charles 
Plottner, Alf 
Poknandt, H. 
Pommer. Jon 
Power, F. A. 
Publlcatus, Aug 
Punls. Antoni 
Qulnn. William 
Rinta. Karl 
Ritcher. J. 
Rivera, Ben 
Rivera. John 
Roberts, Grift 

. l-'iitz 
Rolland, Lars O. 
Rosenqulst, A. 
Rotter, R. 
Rudt. Walter 
Rundqulst. O. 
Ryan, James 
Ryan, Patrick 

Schmidt, Emil 
Schmitt. F. 
Schneider. H 
Schroder, Willy 
Schub.uk. Henry 
Schuldt, Teodore 
Schultz, F. .1. 
Scott. A 
Sjoras. Johan 
Seberg. G. 
Sellers, Wm. G. 
Sikman, A. 
Sivers, Frank 



Slmonsen, S. -2046 
Sinnott, Nickolas 
Skoglund, Harry 
Skegoldenborg, F. 

is. John 
Smith, Donald 
Smith, L. K. 
Smith, Lyman M. 
Smith, Max. 
Sneider, G. 
Soderberg, R. 
Solberg. Bernt 
Sorensen, Anton 
Sorensen, Eduard 
Sorensen, Jens 
Sorensen, Jorgen 
Sorensen, L. A. 
Sorensen, Vigo 
Spanas, Nick 
Spanon, James 

-h, R. 
Steinfart, J. H. F. 

Tamlsar, P. 

Tamman, K. 

Tanum. Helge 

Taronske, Teo 

Taucer, Charles 

Thewas, e. J. 

Thompson, Johan 

Thompson, John 

Thorsen, Rolf 

Ulman, John 

Valboe, H. 

Van Frank. W. O. 

Verney, Paul 

Wacner, Wll 

Waldman, Edward 

Walker, Erlck 

Wallin, Gustaf 

Walter, John 

Wanag, J. 

Wans, E. 

Webber, Charlie 

Weiss, Kar 

Weltz, Hille 

Werner, Chas. I. 
roft. L. E. 

White. J. D. 

White. Peter 

Yejola, Yejo 

Zabel, Carl 

it, Karl 
. Walter 

Zerket, B. W. 

Zlehr, Ernst 



Stenberg, Alfred 
Stenberg, Gus 
Stensland, Paul 
Stendabl John 
Slintman, J. 
Stolzerman, E. 
Strand, Charley 
Strand, Konrad 
Strasdin, W. 
Stratten, Henry 
Strauss, W. 
Stromberg. O. 
Substad, Pete E. 

K. K. 

Svendson, J. 
Svensen, Albert 
Soensen. C. J. 
Swanson. E. 
Swanson. Martin 
Swanson, O. 
Szallies, Gustav 

Thorsen, Theodore 
Tlerney, Pat 
Tolllnger, A. 
Tomberg, Matt -593 
Tonzel, R. 
Traynor. John 
Trledrlch, H. 
Tuppitz, C. 



ard, Jens 
Villemayer, Walter 
Vogel. Gus 
Whiteside. Fred 
Wickstrom, Axel 
Wihtol, J. 
Williams. J. C. 
Wills. George 
Wilson, J. W. 
Wiltz, Arnulf 
Wintlier, Haakon 
Winton. J. A. 
Witt, Otto 
Wold. Olaf -1285 
Wollesen, A. Chr. 
Wremmer. George 
Wrig, Frank 

Zunk. Bruno 
Zurenberg, Fritz 
Zwartz, M. C. 
ZweyDerg, John 



PACKAGES. 
Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 



>r the Pacific. 
Anderson, A. 
Heiling. J. B. 
Billington, Martin 
Ceelan, John 
Ellefsen. Otto 
Furth, Richard 
Hansen, Karl 
Hansen, Marlus 
Hansen, O. 
Hendrlksen. Hag- 
hart 
Hillig, Albert 
Jansson, A. L. 
Johansen, A. K. 

Inhansen, Emil 
Jorgensen. Aluf 
Legander, Benj. 
Nor, Nils 



Olsen, Arne 
Olsen. Carl -1101 
Pennlngrud, Ludwlk 
Persson, Oscar 
Petersen. Aage 
Raasch, O. 
Raaum, Henry 
Rarly, Frans 
Rathke. Reinhold 
Relursen. A. L. 
Roberts, John 
Sorensen. Pete 
Smith, Max 
Strasdin. A. W. 
Wakely, R. E. 
Wlnje. Hilmar 
Wurthman, W. L. 



Phones: Office, Franklin 7766 

Res., Park 6950 
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 6:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cal. 



TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO ST., near Market 

Phone Douglas 4174 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

'Nut Sed 



FRENCH AMERICAN 
BANK OF SAVINGS 

Savings and Commercial 

108 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Resources . $7,700,000 

Member of Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco 

United States Depository for 

Postal Savings Funds 

DIRECTORS 

G. Beleney J. M. Dupas 

J. A. Bergerot John Ginty 

S. Blssinger J. S. Godeau 

Leon Bocqueraz Arthur Legallet 

O. Bozlo Geo. W. McNear 

Charles Carpy X. De PIchon 



nnnzinnDnrjnnnniinnnnnDDiJLJLJUG 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Ned Kirchheimer, a native of Ger- 
many, weight about 215 pounds, age 
49. blue eyes and dark curly hair, who 
left his home April 24, 1915, to look 
for work, is inquired for by his wife. 
Anyone knowing the whereabouts of 
the above named, please notify Mrs. 
Elsie Kirchheimer, 712 Rush Ave., 
Houston, Tex. 9-29-15 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 

(Member of the Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco.) 

The following Branches for Receipt and 

Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mis- 
sion and 21st streets. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. W. 
Corner Clement street and 7th avenue. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. 
Corner Haight and Belvedere streets. 

JUNE 30, 1915: 

Assets $60,321,343.04 

Deposits 67,362,899.35 

Capital actually paid up in 

cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve & Contingent Funds 1,958,443.69 

Employees' Pension Fund 199,164.12 

Number of Depositors 66,965 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 60 cents per day, or 
%2 to $2.50 per week, with all modern 
conveniences. Free Hot and Cold Shower 
Bath on every floor. Elevator Service. 
AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front Street and Broadway, 
Opposite Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. Office 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



Phone Garfield 833 



E. Benvenutl, Mgr. 



HOTEL FAIRFIELD 

250 Large Sunny Rooms Furnished Up- 
to-date. With all Latest Conveniences 
and Elevator Service. Rates: 25, 30 and 
50 cts per Day. $1.25 per Week and Up. 
Free Baths — Large Reading Room 
1325 STOCKTON STREET 
Near Broadway San Francisco, Cal. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Fair Prices. Reliable Good*. 

50 East Street, 

San Francisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopee 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN ® NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Cigars and Tobacco 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



JORTALLBROS.EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 

206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Fred Marjama, a native of Russia, 
age 36, has not been heard from since 
1908, at Buffalo, N. Y. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify his brother, J. Marjama, 51 
South St., New York, N. Y. 9-1-15 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

CLASSY CLOTHIER 

HATTER AND FURNISHER 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

UNIFORMS 



Gold Braid and Gold Wreaths 
of All Descriptions 



News from Abroad. 



Phone Douglas 1082 

139 EAST STREET - - - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Between Merchant and Washington 



g> m. ig^^V W^ r~* T~^ g> See that this label (in light 
,^^ IV/I C 3 1^. l~L.I ,l ^^^S bme ) appears on the box in 
WlTlV^l^V^l^ ^-"which you are served. 



Issued by Autftonty of tne Cigar Makers' International Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

<Jhi# drrlrfift. nw*» at** imtmt trMi to nnin ■*. fr» BBHte WM M MI 



wnctnail of *5 M0M.MATOIIU ml INTEUffWU WUMK Of Dit 
Uwm CtQjn to all vnokar* Uirmatout U» worid 
illUnqwni iiiin-itiii I ihi'-ir'r i — *— ' jgWW 

Q. 7? (£Ufou44. Pmuknt, 



devoted rotlw ad- 
rhtn<u«»wraaaaatf 



*»• SIMILE 



J. MILLER 

124 EAST STREET Garfield 7690 

Union Store 

HATS, CAPS, 

FURNISHING GOODS, 

ETC. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN. 
San Francisco. 

Blom, J. Petterson, Carl 

Ekeland, Will Hj. Thorsen, Ole 
Hakansson, Ingvar Thorstensen, H. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

•THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANlirACTURERS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 

Phone Douglas 1660 



BANK OF ITALY 

San Francisco Los Angeles 

San Jose San Mateo 

The Story of Our Growth 

As Shown by a Comparative 
Statement of Our Resources. 

December 31, 1904 $285,436.97 

December 31. 1905 $1,021,290 80 

December 31, 1906 $1,899,947.28 

December 31, 1907 $2,221,347.35 

December 31, 1908 $2,574,004.90 

December 31, 1909 $3,817,217.79 

December 31, 1910 $6,539,861.49 
December 31, 1911 $8,379,347.02 

December 31,1912 $11,228,814.56 
December 31,1913 $15,882,911.61 

Dec. 31,1914, $18,030,401.58 

June30,l9i5,*19,080,264.20 

NUMBER OF DEPOSITORS, 53,946 



Samuel Dickson, a seaman, age 
about 40 years, son of Moffett Dick- 
son, deceased, of Belfast, Ireland, or 
any person knowing his whereabouts. 
is requested to communicate at once 
with the undersigned in connection 
with a legacy. A. R. Smith, U. S. 
Shipping Commissioner, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of John Burke, No. 2, a member of 
the Marine F. O. and Watertenders' 
Association of the Great Lakes, last 
heard of in Chicago, will please com- 
municate with Mrs. Julia Noonan, 
276 Twelfth street, Jersey City, N. J. 

William Walker, a native of Island- 
magee, Antrim Co., Ireland, is in- 
quired for by his nephew. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts kindly com- 
municate with John Walker, Geddis, 
7 Willowbank St., Brooklands, Win- 
nipeg, Manitoba, Canada. 

Edvin Nikolai Nielsen, a native of 
Kristiania, Norway, is requested to 
communicate with his sister Minni, 
who has important news from home. 
Address, Mrs. Minni Hall, Green 
Farm, Conn. 9-16-14 

Herman Sigfrid Persson, a native 
of Malmo, Sweden, supposed to be 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, who has 
not been heard of for two years, is 
inquired for by his brother, Gustav 
Persson. Address 13 Stenbarksgatan 
Malmo, Sweden. 7-28-15 

Vencelus Durbich is inquired for 
by his brother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please communicate with 
Gerolamo Durbich, Zurich, Switzer- 
land. 7-28-15 

John Dickson, who left Greenock, 
Scotland, about 10 years ago, his last 
address was Melrose House, Lower 
Boxhill, Brooklyn, New Zealand, is 
inquired for by his mother. Any- 
body knowing if he is alive or dead 
please notify the Secretary of the 
National Sailors' and Firemen's Un- 
ion, Greenock, Scotland. 



The British Minister of Munitions, 
David Lloyd George, has taken over 
715 private munitions plants since the 
creation of his department. 

Renewed disturbances in Portugal 
are announced as an insurrection in 
Lisbon and in the principal provincial 
cities. No statement has been given 
out by the Portuguese government. 

The Italian campaign and the cam- 
paign at the Dardanelles show little 
change. The Italians are preparing 
to renew their attack on Goritz on 
the Isonzo River, which must be 
taken before they can advance upon 
Trieste. 

The German Government, in a note 
from the foreign office to James W. 
Gerard, American ambassador, made 
a disclaimer of responsibility for the 
sinking of the steamship "Hesperian." 
On the face of the evidence the Gov- 
ernment is satisfied the "Hesperian" 
was not sunk by a German sub- 
marine. 

The British export coal trade con- 
tinues to show signs of the paralysis 
due to the great war. The ship- 
ments from the United Kingdom in 
July this year were 3,539,117 tons, 
as compared with 6,599,481 tons in 
July, 1914, and 6,975,211 tons in July, 
1913. These totals were increased 
to 5,731,932 tons, 6,917,852 tons, and 
7,275,630 tons respectively by the 
addition of coke and patent fuel. 

Pending final action by the Haitian 
Congress on the Treaty with the 
United States, giving the supervision 
of the island's finances to the Amer- 
ican Government, Rear-Admiral Ca- 
perton reports that it has been nec- 
essary to declare martial law in Port 
au Prince, the capital, and practically 
all the open ports. It is said that 
the Navy's functions will be con- 
fined to collecting the customs and 
maintaining order. 

Among reforms demanded by the 
Manila (Philippine Islands) Inde- 
pendent in Bilibid prison are: "The 
abolition of inhuman punishments 
such as carrying stone of 35 pounds 
under the intense heat of the sun, 
bread and water, and the inquisi- 
torial iron rings"; according of equal 
treatment to white and native pris- 
oners; and separation of prisoners 
convicted of political offenses, or on 
account of their opinions, from rob- 
bers and assassins. 

The British Admiralty announced 
that in all probability, the British 
submarine "E-7" had been sunk off 
the Dardanelles. The statement fol- 
lows: "The enemy claims to have 
sunk the submarine 'E-7,' Lieuten- 
ant-Commander Archibald D. Coch- 
rane, off the Dardanelles, and to 
have taken three officers and twen- 
ty-five of the crew prisoners. As 
no news has been received from this 
submarine since September 4, it must 
De presumed that this report is cor- 
rect." 

In explanation of the activity of 
German submarines in the Bay of 
Biscay the assertion is made by a 
Bordeaux newspaper that a Spanish 
steamship left Bilbao recently with 
three hundred barrels of benzine. 
Where the cargo was unloaded is 
unknown, but soon after the steam- 
ship left port empty barrels were 
seen floating on the sea. The news- 
paper declares the same steamship 
took fifty barrels of benzine to a 
submarine at Concha de Artedo last 
June. Private advices received at 
Bilbao stated that agents have been 
scouring the north of Spain for 
gasoline which has been sent to Bay 
of Biscay ports. 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the Wits. 



Not Crowded. — Coasting Skipper 
do interviewer) — Yus. From your 
rs you'd think the sea round the 
coast was full of German subma- 
rines. But it ain't so reely. W'y. 
sometimes we goes for as much as 
a tiour without seein' p'raps more 
than one of 'em. — Cartoon. 



A Fair Start. — "Why do you ob- 
ject t<> my marrying your daughter?" 

"Because you can't support her in 
the style to which she has been ac- 
nied all her life." 

"How do you know I can't? I 
can start her on bread-and-milk, 
same as you did!" — Tit-Bits. 



Strategic — "Fore!" shouted the 
golfer, ready to play. 

But the woman on the course paid 
no attention. 

"Fore!" he repeated, with not a 
bit more effect than the first time. 

"Try her with 'Three ninety- 
eight,' " suggested his partner. "She 
may be one of those bargain- 
counter fiends." — Boston Transcript. 



Instant Relief.— Cholly (to shop- 
man)— I say — aw— could you take 
that yellow tie with the pink spots 
out of the show-winder for me? 

Shopman— Certainly, sir. Pleased 
to take anything out of the window 
any time, sir. 

Cholly— Thanks, awf'ly. The beast- 
ly thing bothers me every time I 
pass. Good-mawning. — Christian Reg- 
ister. 



One Way Out.— A short time 
back, while a certain general was 
inspi i regiment just about to 

depart for new quarters, he asked a 
young subaltern what would be his 
next order if he was in command of 
a regiment passing over a plain in 
a hostile country, and he found his 
front blocked by artillery, a brigade 
of dSvalry on his right flank, and a 
morass on his left, while his retreat 
was cut off by a large body of in- 
fantry. 

"Halt! Order arms, ground arms, 
kneel down, say your prayers!" re- 
plied the subaltern. — Tit-Bits. 



I Secure and Profitable 

The wise man keeps part of hie 
money in a reliable savings bank. If 
you are making money now, why not 
put aside something for a rainy day? 

Savings and Commercial Depts., 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCI8CO 



BAGLEY'S 
Old Colony 

THE HIGHEST TYPE OF 

TOBACCO PACKED IN 

10c TINS, ALSO 16 OZ. 

GLASS JARS 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco, Cal. 

THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 

Is under the direct and personal supervision 

of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equip- 

ped with all modern appliances to Illustrate 

and teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation In the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always In view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and Is now. In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and Its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There Is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how Igi.orant the seaman may be. even in the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of Ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and in a 
comparatively short Interval of time. 




m 



UNION LABEL OF THE 

UNITED HATTERS OF N. A. 



When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 

him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN W. SCULLEY, President MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary-Treasurer 

Rooms 72-73 Bible House, New York City 



*^i^ 



STRICTLY UNION STORE 

J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET, OPPOSITE FERRY POST OFFICE 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER — UNION LABEL 
NOTICE! BOSS OF ROAD 
OVERALLS— PRICE, 70 CENTS 

Phone Douglas 1737 

Demand the Union Label 



DoaLT:LTDaDDnnnnnaDDnnnDnnDDDDnnDDDaLT:nnncE3na3DDDnnDLXin 

a 

D 



Christensen's Navigation School 



I roawm workers 



UIVIOIV 



65TtoAirtJwi1y ot tha <-o- fl 

" 1HTERNOT0NAL 
UNION. 

Al gQlArJK 
v-J^JfZSLt MADE 



Established 1906 

116 DRUMM STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

(SCANDINAVIAN SAILORS HOME) 

Under Capt. Christensen's per 
sonal and undivided supervision 
pupils of this favorably knowi 
school are taught all up-to-date re- E 
quirements for passing a successful J 
examination before the U. S. In- 3 
spector. As only a limited number - 
of pupils will be accepted at one £ 
time, delay and loss of time will [ 
be avoided while preparing for ex- P 
amination. 

REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 

THE POPULAR PRICE JEWELRY STORE 

ScwmenCh 

715 Market Street, San Francisco 

NEAR CALL BUILDING 

Jewelers, Watchmakers, Opticians 

James Ji.Sorensen 

#»- •*• SOUVENIRS 







"2* 



Upholding American 
PROSPERITY 



HI Value 




The key to Prosperity is Saving! 
So make up your mind to prosper 
by buying one of Hale's $1.00 Banks 
for only 50c. It is the best possible 
way to teach the children thrift and 
the vital principles of saving. We 
keep the key, and you can only open 
the Bank by bringing It to Hale's 
Do what you wish with the money 
Banks on Sale at Transfer Desk. 




jOooa oooi>** . 

Market at Fifth 



LVNDSTROM HATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 
in 4 Stores: 
1126-28 MARKET STREET 
2640 MISSION STREET 
605 KEARNY STREET 
26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 

iTSAJvilJEL 

The Old Union Store 

CLOTHING $ GENTS 
FURNISHING GOODS 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, 

Boots, Shoes, Rubber Boots and 

Oil Clothing of All Kinds, 

Watches, Jewelry, Etc. 

693 THIRD STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

Opp. S. P. Depot at Third & Towmend 



Justice to All. Please Give Us a Trial 
and You Will Be Convinced. 



"YOUR HATTER" 
FRED AMMANN 



72 Market Street 
San Francisco 



Union Hats 



V\AAArV^N^VVV^^VVVVVVVVVVVVVVSi^V>/VVS 



CJBfrBasr'ai 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



s 






FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXIX, No. 4. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1915. 



Whole No. 2350. 



THE LA WS ON CASE. 

A Brief History, Based on Court Records and Plain Facts. 



The United Mine Workers of America an- 
nounce that so many inquiries have been re- 
ceived asking for a detailed account of the re- 
cent trial and conviction of John R. Lawson 
that it was finally decided to prepare the follow- 
ing plain statement of facts: 

Lawson's Life History. 

John R. Lawson, recently sentenced by Judge 
Granby Hillyer, at Trinidad, Col., to life im- 
prisonment, was born in Schuylkill County, 
Pennsylvania, in 1871, the son of a coal miner. 
At the age of eight years he went to work in 
the mines, picking slate as a "breaker boy." A 
year and a half later he became a "trapper boy," 
and after two years a mule driver in the mine, 
and later a miner digging coal. He has worked 
as a coal miner in Pennsylvania, Oregon, 
Wyoming, and Colorado. In 1898 he was mar- 
ried, and his family consists of his wife and a 
daughter fifteen years of age. In 1905 he was 
elected a member of the International Executive 
Board of the United Mine Workers of America, 
as the representative of District No. 15, which 
district consists of Colorado, New Mexico, and 
Utah. The miners of these States have, with 
the exception of a few months in 1909, con- 
tinued him in this position. His home has 
been in Denver, Col., since 1908. 

Prior to the coal strike in Southern Colorado, 
which began in September, 1913, the miners ap- 
pointed a policy committee consisting of Frank 
J. Hayes, Vice-President of the United Mine 
Workers of America; John McLennan, President 
of the Colorado State Federation of Labor and 
also President of District No. 15; Edward 1.. 
Doyle, Secretary-Treasurer of said district, and 
Board Member John R. Lawson. This commit- 
tee strove for many weeks to secure a con- 
ference with Mr. John D. Rockefeller's coal 
company, the Colorado Fuel & Tron Company, 
and the other coal companies which had allied 
themselves with Mr. Rockefeller's company to 
resist the request of the miners for better con- 
ditions in the mines. All efforts to confer with 
the coal companies were fruitless. The allied 
coal companies refused to even meet and discuss 
the questions with the miners' representatives. 
Numbers of public bodies of men. and prominent 
officers of the State, appealed in vain to the 
operators to have a meeting with the repre- 
sentatives of the miners. There was nothing 
left for the miners to do, when they were re- 
fused even a conference, but to strike, and on 
the 16th day of September, 191.3, 250 delegates, 
coming from all parts of the State where coal 
is mined, assembled in convention in the City of 
Trinidad. They came to the convention with 
grim determination and with full authority to 
represent the wishes of their constituency. In 
taking up for consideration the advisability of 
calling a strike, in view of the arrogant attitude 
of the coal operators, the delegates were unani- 
mous in favor of calling a strike, and to take 
effect at once. Rut, acting on the advice of 
Frank J. Hayes ami John R. Lawson, the con- 
vention voted to delay calling the men out of 
the mines for a week. This delay was created 
as a last hope that the coal operators would 
change their unfair position, and for the sake of 
peace and justice would agree to meet in joint 



conference representatives of their employes. 
The extension of time brought forth no results, 
and on the 23d of September, 1913, the many 
thousands of miners in Southern Colorado laid 
down their tools. The companies owned the 
houses in which the workmen lived, and the 
miners were forced to leave their homes, and, 
with their wives and children, take up their 
abode in tent colonies, one of these colonies 
being that of Ludlow, where, on April 20, 1914, 
occurred the terrible massacre in which mine 
guards, in the guise of militiamen, attacked and 
burned the tent colony, which resulted in the 
burning and smothering to death of numbers 
of women and children. 

When the miners w^ent out on the strike the 
allied coal companies brought into the field pro- 
fessional gunmen from all over the United 
States, including the strike-breaking detective 
agency known as the Raldwin-Fclts Agency, and 
armed them with high-power rifles and machine 
guns. The sheriff of the county commissioned 
these men, many of whom had been brought 
from other Slates, as deputy sheriffs. In other 
words, he commissioned the hired gunmen of 
the coal companies as officers of the law. Prior 
to the massacre at Ludlow, to wit, on October 
25, 1913, one of these men, John Nimmo, was 
killed in a battle at Ludlow. It was for the 
death of this man, Nimmo, that Lawson was 
sentenced to imprisonment. As shown from the 
evidence produced in court, Lawson had no part 
whatever in the battle in which Nimmo was 
killed. 

"Ludlow" and the Aftermath. 

After the killing of the women and children 
at Ludlow in April, 1914, a grand jury was em- 
paneled at Trinidad. Although the coroner's 
jury which held an inquest over the bodies of 
these women and children had reported blame 
on the coal companies, not a coal mine operator 
nor one of their alleged "guards" was indicted, 
but instead, indictments were returned against 
great numbers of miners. A partisan report 
was made by the grand jury, blaming the miners 
and whitewashing the operators, and to this day 
not a single indictment has been returned for 
the massacre of the wives and children of the 
miners who lost their lives in the ashes of 
Ludlow 

John R. Lawson was one of the indicted men. 

He was, as before stated, accused of the alii 1 

murder of the mine guard Nimmo. 

Upon the return of the indictment the at- 
torneys for the United Mine Workers filed on 
behalf of Lawson a plea in abatement. This 
plea asked that the indictment In- quashed, and 
alleged under oath thai thi operators had 

been permitted by the sheriff to nominate and 
select tlie members of the grand jury, and that 
they had filled the panel with coal comp 
partisans, including coal company employes, al- 
leged deputy sheriffs, and men who had actually 
participated as hired men for the coal comp 
in actual battles which bad occurred, and who 
had boasted that they had killed striking miners. 
It was shown in the plea that the judge of the 
COUrl had not caused the "land fury to ]., dl 
from the regular jury box, but had authorised 
the sheriff to select the grand jurors, and Lhat 



the sheriff allied with the coal companies had 
permitted the coal operators to name the grand 
jury, with the result of securing indictments 
against the miners and permitting the operators' 
crowd to go free. 

A Most Remarkable Procedure. 
To this plea in abatement, astounding in its 
nature, no answer was filed denying the charges, 
but Jesse G. Northcutt, the chief attorney for 
the allied coal operators, signed and filed a de- 
murrer, setting up that, even admitting all the 
allegations in the plea in abatement to be true, 
they furnished no ground for the quashing of 
the indictment. This demurrer was also signed 
by Fred Farrar, Attorney-General of the State of 
Colorado. In other words, the Attorney-General 
of the State of Colorado permitted the coal 
operators to have their attorney appear in 
court against Mr. Lawson and to claim that, 
even if they had packed the grand jury, it 
furnished no cause of complaint to Mr. Lawson. 
The startling claim made by this demurrer was 
heard before Judge Charles C. Butler, of Denver, 
who was called on to come down to the Trinidad 
district and determine whether or not the plea in 
abatement was good. Judge Butler horrified 
the coal operators and the Attorney-General of 
the State of Colorado by holding that the plea 
in abatement was good. In other words, he 
overruled the demurrer, and said that the At- 
torney-General and the coal operators' attorney 
would have to file a denial of these charges 
or else Mr. Lawson would be released. It is 
worthy of note at this point, that so incensed 
did the powers that be become at Judge Butler 
for this ruling that he has not been since called 
upon to preside in any other matter in any strike 
case, and, as will be seen later in this statement, 
a scheme was adopted of having a new judge 
to preside. After Judge Butler had ruled that il 
was illegal to permit a grand jury to he packed 
by the coal operators, a denial of the charges 
made in the plea in abatement was placed upon 
the records. This presented an issue of fact, 
and Mr. Lawson was entitled to have the ques- 
tion of fact tried and disposed of. But the At- 
torney-General and his associate, the coal com- 
pany lawyer, gave .Mr. Lawson no opportunity 
to prove the truth of his allegation. They dis- 
missed the indictment filed against .Mr. Lawson, 
and thereby prevented him from proving the 
truth of his charges, and immediately filed an 
"information" making the same charge. The 
information was sjmply a written statement 
signed by the \ 1 1 ornc v Lencral that Lawson 
committed said alleged offense, and was sworn 
lo by one of the sheriff's deputies who bad him- 
self participated in the battles which bad 01 
curred. 'Ibis information was tiled on the 13th 

day of February, 1915. 

Shortly after this, tin >rs seemed 

the appointment b> Governor Carlson of an 
additional judge for the Third Judicial I 
i rict, ami the < I. o ein. e mby 

llilher, oi Lamar, Colorado, 'in Vlarch 3, 1915, 
I uilve Hillyer cami to ["rinidad to hold court, 
I mmediately upon his first appearand 
I i son i]]ci\ a petit i' in, which wat • to, 
which stated that Judge Hillyer was one of thj 
coal company attorneys employed by the allied 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



coal operators in their prosecutions against the 
strikers. These allegations were supported by 
the affidavits of nun f citizens. It was 

further stated that Judge Hillyer, in addition to 

■irt on behalf of the mine o 
tors in thi cutions against strikers, was 

bitter in his denunciation of the strikers, and had 
repeatedly stated that the miners were outlaws 
who should be denied the benefit of the privilege 
of writs of habeas corpus when arrested and 
held incommunicado, and that said Hillyer had 
been paid a considerable sum of money by the 
operators, that he had never been employed bj 
any board of county commissioners to prosecute 
the miners, nor requested by any district attor- 
i appear against the miners, nor authorized 
by any court to appear, but was simply a hired 
attorney of the coal operators, and had appeared 
in court for them in prosecutions again 
miners. The law of the State of Col 
is well settled that when such affidavits are 
filed, the judge of the court loses jurisdiction, 
and has no right to do anything to call 

in another judge to preside. But Judge Hillyer 
on March 9, 1915, overruled Haw son's applica- 
tion for a change of judge, and announced thai 
lie would try the case himself. 

The Trial of Zancanelli. 
On March 15. 1915, Judge Hillyer began the 
trial of Louis Zancanelli, one of the strikers 
whose case came on for trial before the Lawson 
this trial the jurors were men whose 
names had been sent to the court by the Board 
of County Commissioners tor jury service. In 
other words, the jury was regularly drawn from 
the jury box. This trial of Zancanelli lasted 
about ten days, and resulted in a mistrial, the 

ity of the jurors voting not guilty, only a 
few of them voting for a conviction. It then 
appeared to the coal operators thai si 
system than the regular way of drawing jurors 
would have to be resorted to in order to secure 
convictions, so they had their attorney, Jesse 
G. Northcutt, who was not a public official, and 
had never been authorized by any public official 
to appear in the cases, appear before Judge 
Hillver and ask that the jurj done away 

with', and that the sheriff be authorized to select 
a jury. This same attorney, Jesse G. North- 
cutt, had testified before the Congressional Com- 
mittee which came to Colorado in February, 
1914, that the jury had always to be drawn 
the box if a defendant objected to an open 
venire. Bui on this occasion, on behalf of the 
coal companies hi- asked Judge Hillyer not to 
draw the jury from the box. but to authorize 
the sheriff to select the jurors, and Judge Hillyer. 
over the objection of defendant, actually granted 
the request of the coal company attorney. The 
sheriff thereupon brought in as jurors, 
company doctors, coal company employes, deputy 
sheriffs and men who had been in conflicts with 
the miners, as jurors to try the striking miners, 
and before a jury of this class of nun Zancanelli 
was placed upon trial. The first jury had almost 
unanimously reported in his favor. On the 

d trial the coal company attorney insisted 
that jurors could not be asked the question as 
to whether they Could give the defendant at the 
outset of the trial the benefit of tl 
of innocence. This simple question was oh 
to, because if it had been permitted to be asked 
and answered it would ha. n that the 

jurors were so partisan that they could not 
give to the defendant the benefit of bis con- 
stitutional rights. Judge Hillyer sustained the 
objection of the coal company attorney, and 
ruled the question incompetent He even r 
the attorney who appeared for Zancanelli per- 
mission to ask a juror whether or not he. the 
juror, had been in battles between tl 
and tl d mine guards. Affidavits were 

presented to Judge Hillyer showing that - 
the jurors was actually betting on the result of 
the trial, and had said that he would either 
hang the defendant or hang the jury. Bu1 
Hillyer, in the face of uncontrad davits, 

refused to allow the juror to be questioned as to 
this fact. The explanation, of course, of these 
remarkable rulings is that Judge Hillyer had 
been a part of the legal machinery of th 
companies in the prosecution of the miners, 
and was so prejudiced that he was unable to 
preside fairly at the trial. The defendant Zan- 
canelli was then upon placed on trial I 
coal company partisans, one of whom was 
gambling on the verdict. sull of the 

trial was foreordained. Zancanelli was. of 
coursi ;ed. 

Lawson Placed on Trial. 
John R. Lawson was then placed on trial. \ 
motion was filed on his behalf asking that the 
prosecution be compelled to furnish a bill of 
particulars stating whether Lawson was charged 
with having actually killed Nimmo, or whether 
the claim was that he was an accessory, or 
whether he was charged with having been a 
member of some conspiracy, the written charges 
against Lawson fumising no information as to 
these particulars. Judge Hillyer denied t ! 
plication, and sent Lawson to trial without his 

informed whether the claim v 
had actually shot a man. or thai he had en- 
couraged someone to shoot him, or that he was 
a party to a conspiracy. 

Lawson also filed a motion to le the 

panel of jurymen on the ground of prejudice 
and the manner of its selection. This motion 
Judge Hillyer denied. A petition asking that the 
court select a jury from the regular jury box 
containing over 200 names sent up by the 



of County Commissioners for jury service, was 
also deni( 

On the 21st of April, 1915, the trial of Law 

son began. V. ion for a postponement 

of the trial was filed by Lawson, and duly 

ed that the defendant could 

not be ready for trial on account of a large 

mine guard witnesses having been 

n the information only a lew days 

prior to the day of the trial. The showing was 

made that the defendant had had no Opportunity 

to investigate the character of the men who 

were ti him, or where they came 

■ erruled the apple 
and forced Lawson to trial. The testi 
against Lawson was wholly insufficient to justify 
iction, and no jury other than one selected 
in the manner in which the Lawson jury was 
ave returned a verdict of 
guilty, ami even that jury could n< ten to 

find Lawson guilty until the bailiff threatened 
the jury with the statement that the court had 
ordered them locked up without anything to 
eat until they agi i 

The great majority of the witnesses against 
on did not mention his name, or 
indirectly refer to him. The only witnesses who 
gave incriminating testimony against Lawson 
were two Baldwin-Felts detectives. Charles 
Snyder and Pat Murphy, alias Petty. These two 
men, who were brothers-in-law, admitted that 
they were in the pay of the coal operators, and 
had been working to obtain evidence again -t 
m. One of them, Murphy, alias Petty, 
admitted on i an ination that he \ 

convicted forger, and had served tim 
gery. The other. Snyder, admitted on I 
examination that he had tried to blackmail the 
United Mine V mey and that 

Mr. Lawson had refused to pay blackmail, and 
that he had threatened i he did ni i 

the money. He admitted that Lawson had said 
that he did not intend to permit Snyder to 
blackmail the union. He admitted a grudge 
against Lawson because of Lawson's refusal to 
submit to blackmail. The character of these 
two men vva^ shown to be disreputabb 
they were put forward by the coal operators to 
testify, and did testify that they saw Lawson on 

ring line while the battle was 
with the mine guards. Xo other witness 
anything of the kind. 

The instructions given by Judge Hillyi 
the jury were unfair towards Lawson, and his 
instructions and rulings showed that the charge 
which had been made that he was prejudiced 
vva~ true. 

Jury in Lengthy Session. 
The Lav e went to the jury for final 

consideration nil Saturday, May 1, 1915. and the 
jury was unable !" agree all day Sunday. On 
Monday morning an agreement had noi 

d. At noon Monday, while the jury was 
still d Frank Gooden, a court 

appointed by Judge Hillyer, and who had, 

of the partisan grand jury 
condui in had attacked in his pl< 

abatement, went into the jury i 1 told 

the jurors that Judge Hillyer had ordered them 
locked up in i without anything to 

eat until they reached an agreement. Under 
this threat an agreement of guilty was reached. 
and the jury was then given its noonday 
In no other way could even a prejudiced jury 
have been gotten to return a verdict of 
against John R. Lawson. After the jury had 

d, numbers of them made 
davits showing the misconduct of the bailiff and 
the th had been indulged in. and how 

the verdict was returned through coercion. A 

iew trial was thereupon m> 
behalf of | owing 

■iliffs threat, and in addition it was shown 
Tie bailiff had false! v stated to ' 
Hall, a iuror V >Ul for Lawson, 

- iid juror's wife Wi ill. The 

plan was to get this juror to agree to a verdict 
of guilty in his ha le to his wife, 

whom the bailiff bad reported to be ah 
die. There was also '-led in support of the 
for a new trial the affidavit of : 
had talked with the court bailiff, and to 
the bailiff had boasted how he had co- 
erced the if guilty. 'I'he bailiff did not 
lib- any affidavit denying any of the cl 
which, had been ma 1st him, nor did the 
call him to the witness stand 
ny judge 
would h 
an in n court of t ' 
made by I. aw sou. but Judge Hillyer. v 

ailiff t.i testify or to dispute the 

i hich had been made and sworn to. 

y overruli otion for a new trial, and 

sentenced Lawson to imprisonn life at 

labor in the Stale penitenti 

sentence up. .n Lawson, 
ttomeys for the miners under indictment 
i . tile Supreme Court of Colorado and 
tlted an at.plieati' in 
Hillver he prohibited from proceeding in any 
further trials, and claiming that he had no 
ter a motion had been made for a 
change of judge. The Supreme Court granted 
a temporary writ of prohibition preventing 
Hillyer from trying any further cases, 
and set the final argument as to Hillvcr's juris- 
diction or lack of jurisdiction for July 12. 1015. 
On that day. July 12. when the attortu 
the United Mine Workers of America v. 
the Supreme Court arguing the question as to 
Hillyer's jurisdiction, he, Judge Hillyer, without 



giving them any opportunity to be present, over- 
ruled Lawson's application for a new trial, and 
sent him to prison. Lawson's attorneys had 
led to Judge Hillyer to wait a few days 
until the Supreme Court could pass on the 
I jurisdiction, and he knew that the 
question as to his jurisdiction was being argued 
in the Supreme Court, yet. without waiting for 
Supreme Court decision, and without waiting 
for Lawson's attorneys to return to Trinidad, 
Hillyer overruled the motion for a new trial, 
and, as before -I;. ted. committed Lawson to 
prison. 

The whole record in the case is one of in- 
justice to Lawson. He had no fair trial. He 
mvicted on testimony on wdiich the aver- 
uman being would not even convict a dog, 
much less a fellow man. The trial was before a 
against the strikers, and 
who had been a part of the legal machinery of 
the coal companies in their prosecutions against 
id, in addition, the jurors were 
threatened with starvation in order to coerce 
them into rendering a verdict. 

The statements hereinabove made arc borne 
■"it b ord, and are not overdrawn. 

THE UNIT! : WORKERS OF 

AMERIC \ 

Per Wm. Diamond. Statistician. 



A VALUABLE PAMPHLET. 



The California Industrial Accident Com- 
mission lias had prepared, for the conven- 
ience of the general public, a pamphlet 
combining the Workmen's Compensation, 
Insurance and Safety Act and the various 
acts amendatory of it, which were pa 
at the recent session of the Legislature, 
and which went into effect on August 8, 
1915. The most important amendments. 
other than those relating to procedure, 
are : First, that extending the benefits of 
the law to cover injuries received in the 
course of employment, whether accidental 
or otherwise ; second, one empowering the 
Commission, in special cases, to extend the 
time during which medical and surgical 
benefits shall he furnished to injured em- 
ployees; and. third, one which provides 
that, in case of the loss of an eye or limb, 
an artificial member shall be furnished by 
the employer. Another amendment makes 
it a misdemeanor for an employer to exact 
or receive In m any employee any contri- 
bution, or make any deduction from his 
earnings to cover any part of the cost of 
treatment or compensation provided by 
the Act. There are other changes from 
the original text, all of which are of gen- 
eral interest. 

Copies of the pamphlet will be furnished 
free on application to the Industrial Acci- 
dent Commission, 325 Market street, San 
Francisct >. 



THE PROFESSOR AGAIN! 



Charles \Y. Eliot, emeritus president of 
Harvard University, declares that an early 
would be a disaster to humanity. 

We know Dr. Eliot from of old. 

It is he who has denounced the eight-hour 
movement, alleging that there could not be 
such a thing as overwork. 

It was he who spoke against the idea of 
old-age pensions for workingmen, arguing 
that to pension aged workers was to pauper- 
ize — and then, on his retirement from the 
well-paid office of university president, ac- 
cepted a pension of several thousand dollars 
a year. 

It was he who encouraged college students 
to act as scabs, describing the strikebreaker 
"a high type of American hero." 

We have Dr. Eliot's number. It is quite 
fitting that he should deprecate the peace that 
the world's toilers yearn for. — New York Call. 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Journal's ad columns. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



All Responded to the Call. 

The cartridge workers employed in the 
United States Cartridge Company's plant 
at Lowell, Mass., precipitated a strike last 
week, 1,500 leaving their jobs. A. F. of L. 
Organizer Frank H. McCarty then took 
charge and formed a cartridge workers' un- 
ion. Following that action a list of de- 
mands was drawn up, and by the authority 
of the new union he was instructed to 
present them to the manager, Thomas B. 
Doe. Included in the demands was recog- 
nition of the union, eight hours per day, 
no work between 6 p. m. Saturday and 7 
a. m. Monday, overtime to be paid for at 
the rate of time and one-half, the wages 
of all male operators to be increased 15 
per cent., female operators to be increased 
20 per cent., a definite pay day, and the 
agreement to continue for one year. When 
presented to Manager Doe he asked for 
time to consult the directors. No reply 
has been received from Manager Doe. 
Supt. Gerald Cahill informed the strikers 
that the concessions would not be granted. 

Following the strike of the cartridge 
workers the machinists also left their jobs 
and are now making a common cause with 
the others. The entire plant is closed and 
4,500 men and women are idle. 



A Terrible Disclosure. 

The United States Public Health Service 
has recently made a special study and ex- 
amination of the health of persons engaged 
in the garment industry of New York City. 
In its report it says that the Joint Board 
of Sanitary Control of the Industries and 
the various labor unions connected there- 
with joined in the study and co-operated in 
the investigation and performance of the 
United States officials. Two thousand male 
workers and one thousand female workers 
were examined and a trifle over 2 per cent, 
of the total number of persons examined 
were found free from physical defect or 
disease. A total of 13,457 defects of all 
kinds were found, 9,451 defects being 
among the males and 3,916 among the fe- 
males. The examination disclosed an aver- 
age of 4.36 physical defects or disease to 
each person examined. While all of the 
defects were not serious, many of the physi- 
cal conditions produced an injurious effect 
upon the individual. It was discovered, 
however, that there were no vocational dis- 
eases peculiar to the garment trades, but 
the industry being sedentary, it intensified 
the bad effects upon health and efficiency 
of certain inherent physical defects and 
diseases. 

The prevalence of tuberculosis among 
males was found to be ten times that in 
the United States Army. Among females, 
-tuberculosis was three times the Army rate. 
The most damaging effect disclosed was 
that the dreaded White Plague was most 
prevalent among the lowest paid class of 
workers. 

Aside from tuberculosis, the most com- 
mon physical troubles were defective vision, 
69 per cent ; faulty posture, 50 per cent. ; 
chronic nose and throat complaints, 26 per 
cent.; defective teeth, 26 per cent.; weak 
and flat feet, 26 per cent.; diseased tonsils, 
IS per cent.; defective hearing, 10 per cent.; 



nervous affections, 7.75 per cent. Only 11 
per cent, suffering with bad eyesight wore 
glasses and only 2.35 per cent, of these had 
glasses which fully corrected the defects. 

The inspectors were led to conclude that 
a large number of the garment workers' 
afflictions arose from ignorance or neglect 
of personal hygiene. Proper methods of 
instruction were recommended for the bet- 
ter education of such sedentary workers in 
personal hygiene, especially the correction 
of visual defects, correct posture of habits 
and if better instruction is afforded school 
children in these principles, improved health 
results would be more quickly obtained. 

In thirty-four of the workshops a careful 
investigation was made of the light at the 
stations in the shops where workers are 
located. Over one-half of the working sta- 
tions, 1,800 in all, were found to possess 
inadequate illumination. The light from 
windows was obstructed by piles of gar- 
ments. They were unclean and poorly ar- 
ranged. Unshaded lamps and bad reflectors 
were used in many cases either too high or 
too low to afford proper light. More large 
units for local illumination should be used 
and few smaller units. 

Additional reports will be made in the 
future by the Public Health Service with 
regard to health and hygienic conditions 
of workers in other trades. 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



Anthracite Miners' Demands. 

The very successful campaign of organ- 
ization in which President White, of the 
United Mine Workers, has been engaged 
in in the Wilkes-Barre, Pa., section ter- 
minated last week when a convention . of 
500 delegates representing districts 1, 7 and 
9 drew up demands for presentation to the 
operators. The list follows : 

1. We demand that the next contract 
be for a period of two years, commencing 
April 1, 1916, and ending March 31, 1918, 
and that the making of individual agree- 
ments and contracts in the mining of coal 
shall be prohibited. 

2. We demand an increase of 20 per 
cent, on all wage rates now being paid 
in the anthracite coal fields. 

3. We demand an eight-hour work day 
for all day labor employed in and around 
the mines, the present rates to be the basis 
upon which the advance above demanded 
shall apply, with time and half time for 
overtime and double time for Sundays and 
holidays. 

4. We demand full and complete recog- 
nition of the United Mine Workers of 
America in districts 1, 7 and 9, anthracite. 

5. We demand a more simplified, speedy 
and satisfactory method of adjusting griev- 
ances. 

6. We demand that no contract miner 
shall be permitted to have more than one 
working place. 

7. We demand that the selling price of 
coal-mining supplies to miners be fixed on 
a more equitable and uniform basis. 

8. We demand that wherever coal shall 
be mined on the car basis, it shall In- 
weighed and be paid for on a mine-run 
basis by the ton of 2,240 pounds, and all 
refuse cleaned from the coal (either gobbed 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



Internationa] Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, Lon- 
don, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers. 4 Spekeland Bldgs., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts Maritimes de France, 33 rue Grange aux- 
Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 
NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade 15, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 
Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 
ITALY. 
Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S, Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 
Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinnen Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 
SPAIN. 
Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocincros y Reposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 
Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calle tngla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 
Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Ruenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Altos). 

BRAZIL. 

Associacao de Marinheiros e Remandorcs. Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 1>S, Rio de Janeiro. 

Socicdada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo dos Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dns Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 
Amalgamated Society of South African 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World's WorKers. 



Women police are employed in 
Holland, Denmark, Norway, Sweden, 
Russia, Germany, Austria. America, 
and New South Wales. In every 
country their services have l 
so valuable that their numbers are 
growing. 

The Labor Government of Queens- 
land has decided to build all workers' 
dwellings by day labor, and to ob- 
tain the timber from government 
sawmills. Step by step the middle- 
men contractors are being pushed 
aside. 

Two hundred girls employed at 
making soldiers' clothes in the I 
monwealth clothing factory, Mel- 
bourne (Victoria), went on strike 
against the order of the manager, 
and after a brief suspension of work 
labor scored a victory. 

Vickers-Maxim, Limited, are of- 
fering to pay the passages of 1000 
skilled men from Australia to Eng- 
land at good wages for munition- 
making. A representative of the 
firm is in negotiation with the 
Amalgamated Society of Engineers 
in Sydney. 

Tabor Member Thorne in the Brit- 
ish House of Commons recently 
stated that the wages of English 
workers had advanced by £72,000, 
and the cost of bread and flour 
alone by £700,000 weekly. N 
one is doing well out of the war, and 
it is not the worker. 

The Queensland Minister for Rail- 
ways (Mr. John Adamsonl an- 
nounced recently that the govern- 
ment had decided to grant all work- 
ers engaged in the construction of 
new railways an increase of Is. a 
day from July 1. Between 3000 and 
4000 men will be benefited by this 
increase of wages. 

In the Victorian Legislative As- 
sembly recently the Minister for La- 
bor gave notice of his intention to 
move, "that it is expedient to ap- 
point a special board to determine 
the lowest prices or rates which 
be paid to any persons employed 
as laborers in connection with the 
construction of sewers." 

Tt is estimated that as a result of 
the advanced cost of living in 
Britain, the workman's wage went 
down in value from 3s. to 3s. 6d. per 
week, from July, 1914, to January, 
1913, and the seriousness of the 
position, particularly in the case of 
the more poorly paid workers, has 
been generally (not generously") 
recognized. 

From the Australian Common- 
wealth Statistician's returns it is 
evident that, despite the huge exodus 
of unionists to the front, labor con- 
ditions are still bad. For the first 
quarter of 1914, 15,541 unemployed 
members were on the union books. 
For the first quarter of the current 
year the number was 33,465, or 
double the number. 

The Victorian State mine at Woon- 
thaggi, an echo of the maritime 
strike of '90, is now the largest coal- 
producing mine in Australia. For the 
financial year ended June 30, 1014, 
after allowing £46,202 For 
tion, sinking fund, etc., a net profit 
of £1213 was obtained, derived from 
an output of 510,491) ton-, o) which 
177.S73 tons were sold as slack. 
mine is at present giving employ- 
ment, the Secretary of Mil 
in his report for 1914, to over 1000 
men. of whom 450 are mining coal 
on contract rates and are earning on 
an average 14s. per shift. The output 
is about 2300 tons per day. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. B. CANNON 



CANNON a BLAIZE 



A. E. BLAIZE 



Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 
515 FRONT-516 BEACON STS. .... 8AN PEDRO 



"WHEN IT COMES TO GOOD CLOTHES" 

Tailored to FIT YOU, in a UNION SHOP 
It will be to your Interest to call on 

S. G. SWANSON 

641 SOUTH BEACON STREET, next door to Postoffice 
Established 1904, at the Los Angeles "Waterfront" SAN PEDRO, CALIFORNIA 

^^edr^SewT^ M. BROWN and SONS 

Sixth and Beacon Street*, San Pedro, Cal. 

DEALERS IN ALL KIND8 OF 

STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All Ban 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



^WWMAA^WWVWWVWWWWWWMVt 



Mills, Elbert ® Nash 

SIXTH AND BEACON STREETS 

FIFTH AND BEACON STREETS 

— Dealers In — 

EDGEWORTH TOBACCO AND 

UNION LABEL CIGARS 



GIVE US A TRIAL 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

The members of the crew of the 
barkentine "Mary Winkelman" who 
made the voyage in her to Mollendo, 
Peru, and arrived at San Francisco 
on her return trip on April 5, 1914, 
are wanted by the Charles Nelson 
Co., at San Francisco, Cal. — 6-24-14 

John Erik Nordberg, a native of 
Sweden, age about 26, supposed to 
be sailing on the Pacific Coast, is 
inquired for by his brother Harold, 
care of Sailors' Union of the Pa- 
cific, San Francisco. 

Oscar Olsen, age 37, a native of 
Hallerna, near Gothenborg, Sweden, 
who was sailing on the Great Lakes 
about three years ago, is inquired 
for by John V. Olsen, Sun Com- 
pany, Marcus Hook, Pa. 5-26-15 

Adolph Godfred Eriksen, born in 
Moss, Norway, is inquired for by 
his brother, Herman Eriksen. Any 
one knowing his whereabouts please 
notify W. Nielsen, 206 Moravian St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 5-26-15 



have moved to 

109 SIXTH STREET 

Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Edgar Duncan Stewart, age 22 
years, white, born in Massachusetts, 
who, on October 9, 1912, was 
shipped as seaman on the American 
steamship "Toledo," at Marcus Hook, 
Pa., for a voyage to Sabine, Texas, 
but who did not join the vessel the 
next day, and has not since been 
heard from. The undersigned will 
highly appreciate your kind co-oper- 
ation: Augustine R. Smith, United 
States Shipping Commissioner, or 
Shipping Commissioner, Appraisers 
Building, San Francisco. 5-13-14 

Nils Edmund Johansen, a native of 
Tonsberg, Norway, age about 50, 
last heard of at Melbourne, Austra- 
lia, is inquired for by his brother. 
Address, Martin Johansen, 839 Cen- 
tennial avenue, Alameda, Cal. 

Eugene Martin, age 25, 6 feet tall, 
gray eyes, is inquired for by his 
mother. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify Mrs. Rose T. 
Martin, 4231 15 N. E„ Seattle, 
Wash. 1-27-1915 

Chas. Maywell, a sailor, last heard 
of in New York City in 1892, is en- 
quired for by his son; anyone know- 
ing his whereabouts please notify 
William J. Maywell, 426 West 59th 
street, New York City, N. Y.— 12-23-14 



VN^^/>^^N^>/VN^^>^^VS^rfS^Si^S^^^N^S^^^^i^^ l ^^ , '^'^V^^^Ni^^^^»^^^^i^/^^^^^^^ l ^^^^^^^^^^V l, ^ , V , Srf'»^ , ^VS^^^^N 1 ^^^^ 



A SAILOR'S BANK. 

With Branches Throughout the World 

In the Philippines, Japan, China, Straits Settlements, India, 
London, Mexico and Panama, the 

INTERNATIONAL BANKING CORPORATION 

is particularly well equipped to give service to 

SEA- FARING MEN 

IN THE 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 
of its San Francisco Branch 

it gives "Personal Service" and courteous treatment to all its 

customers. Four per cent, per annum is paid on Savings 

Deposits, computed semi-annually. 

In 1910 it purchased and took over the business of the 

SWEDISH AMERICAN BANK 

and for the accommodation of its Scandinavian customers, 
the bank carries on hand at all times an ample supply of 
Swedish, Norwegian and Danish 5Kr. and lOKr. bank notes. 

Sailors' Accounts are Especially Welcomed 

Head Office— 60 Wall Street, New York 

Resources over $40,000,000 

MILLS BUILDING :: BUSH and MONTGOMERY STREETS 

Uptown Branch, Geary and Fillmore Street! 

Open Saturday Evenings, 6 to 8 

E. W. WILSON, Manager 



San Pedro Letter List. 



Anderson, Emanuel 
'ii, EdW. 
-1739 
Anderson, John -1968 
on, Martin 

-on, Sven. 
Letter.) 

<>n. Oscar 

Enkan 

ApelqUiSt. Otto 
i , Arthur 
i. Borge 
ik, L. 
Hans 
Bensen. Kay 

nan, Leo 
Benrowitz. Felix 
Carera, Pete 

I'ete 
Doyle, William 
I luval, Will 

son, Otto 
Eklund, Sven 
Fisher, Wm. 

n, Oskar 
d, Charly 
Hansen. M. 

ilmar 
. William 
Hannus, Alex. 

1 1. - 1 r. r. 
Victor 
.lohanson, T. 

■ August 
Johansson, Geo. W. 

-1219 
Johanson, Geo. 

on, Edvard A. 
Johansen. Chas. 
Johnson. Herman 
Johansson, John A. 

on, Gus. 

Johnson, K. H. 

K'alnin, Ed. 



Llndeberg, Ernst 
Lata, Eonstant 

Lundstedt, Chris. 
Lutzen, Valdemar 
Lalan, Joe 
Lindsberg, C. 
Larsen, L. K. 
Lindholm, A. 
Matson, Johan 
Mlkalsen, Andreas 

Gustaf 
McGuire. J. 
Mesak. B, 
Martinson, P. A. 
gen, Julius 
Nohr. Niels 
Olsen, 

1, Ludvig 
i ilsen, olaf 
Owen, Fred 
Ophaug. Wilhelm 
oiin. Emll 
Penningrud. Ludvik 
Peterson, Hans. 

-1064 
Peterson, N. 

son, Otto 
Poscet, P. 
Philips, Charley 
Richardson, A. 
Parsons, Olaf 
Rogis. A. 
Renvall. Anshelm 
Smith, Lawrence 
Sutse, Michael 
Sanders. Cha 
Stromsberg. 

nson. Paul z 
Sievers, G. P. 
Tamisar, P. 
Toren, Gustaf A. 
fhlig. Richard 
v. M. O. 
Verdonk. Peter 
Warkkala. John 
Packages. 
Johnson, K. H. 



Honolulu, H. T. 

Anderson. John E. Nelsen, C. F. 

Burk. Harry -1284 Petersen. Carl 

Crantly. C. W. Peters. Walter 

F.ugenlo, John Reither. Fritz 

Ekelund. Rickhard Solberg, B. P. 

Ivertsen. Slgvald B. Strand, Conrad 

T.engwenus, W. L. Thompson, Emll N. 
, F. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Daniel William Thorin is inquired 
for by his mother. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify Fru 
Thorin, Hegagata 7, Gothenborg, 
Sweden. 9-23-14 

Carl Fritjof Johansson Lind, age 
39, a native of Sonderborg, Germany, 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, is in- 
quired for by his brother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify John Lind, 1401 West 9th St., 
Cleveland. Ohio.— 3-24-15. 

Frederick Wood, a seaman, sailing 
on the Pacific Coast, is inquired for 
by his sister, Miss Lucy Wood, 10i 
Broughan street, Darlinghurst, Syd- 
ney, N. S. W, Australia. He is de- 
scribed to be tall, with dark curly 
hair and carries a scar on the nose. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
kindly notify the office of Chief of 
Police, San Francisco. Cal. — 6-24-14. 

Waldemar Stintman, alias Broth, 
a native of Russia, age 21, supposed 
to be sailing on the Pacific Coast. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify his brother, John Stint- 
man, address Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific, San Francisco. 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Magnus Magnussen, a native of 
Soderhamn, Sweden, should at once 
communicate with F. A. Smith, Box 
770, Aberdeen, Wash. 9-23-14 

Martin Xielsen, a native of Den- 
mark, member of the Sailors' Union 
on the Pacific for the last 8 years, 
has not been heard of since July, 
1912. His address then was Sailors' 
Union, Seattle, Wash. Any one- 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify George Leonhard, Sailors' Union, 
59 Clay St.— 8-11-1915. 

Olai Ingebrigtsen (Brock), a na- 
tive of Norway, last heard from 13 
years ago, when leaving San Fran- 
cisco for Australia on the American 
bark "Golden Gate," is inquired for 
by his brother. Any information re- 
garding the above named will be 
gladly received by Niels Ingebrigtsen, 
469 — 49th street, Brooklyn, N. Y.J or 
Sam Andersen, 100 Steuart street, San 
Francisco, Cal. — 8-4-15. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



Harry B. Gregg, Secretary of the Matson 
Navigation Company, has been elected a director 
of the Shipowners' Association of the Pacific 
Coast. The election was made in San Francisco 
at the annual meeting. 

The five submarines under construction at 
Vancouver, B. C, are said to be for the Russian 
navy, delivery to be made at Vladivostok. The 
boats, after completion, will be taken apart and 
shipped in sections on freight steamers. 

The Los Angeles Inner Harbor Fog-Signal 
Station has been equipped with a 3800-pound 
bell, struck by machinery which is electrically 
wound. The apparatus is started and stopped 
by throwing a switch in a warehouse about 800 
feet distant. 

According to a report just issued by the Uni- 
ted States Public Health Service, it will be neces- 
sary for quarantine officials to exercise unusual 
precautions against the major pestilences during 
the coming year. The South American dis- 
tribution of the diseases is considered particular- 
ly important. 

The Panama Canal authorities call attention 
to the fact that a vessel must be on even keel 
when passing through the waterway. When 
listed, a vessel presents steering difficulties that 
may cause accidents, and for this reason the 
canal authorities have power to prevent the 
transit of ships with a heavy list. 

Parties along the beach at Coos Bay, Ore., 
saw a novel sight recently when the old schooner 
"Northwest" was towed to sea, set on fire and 
allowed to drift ashore on the beach several 
miles north of Coos Bay. The craft had been 
moored on Isthmus Inlet for six years and was 
worthless and a menace to navigation. 

The Oakland Paunch & Tugboat Company's 
new excursion launch was launched during the 
past week at the Anderson ship yards in San 
Francisco. The new boat's dimensions arc 60 
by 14:6, making her one of the largest excursion 
launches operating about the bay. She will be 
elaborately furnished and fitted with a high- 
power engine. 

The small power schooner "Diamond L," trad- 
ing along the Siberian coast, was crushed in 
the ice, according? to advices received at Nome, 
Alaska. Mike Gottschalk of the schooner, a 
well-known fur trader of Nome, was taken a 
prisoner to Siberia by the Russian authorities, 
charged with shooting a soldier. The cargo of 
the ship was confiscated. 

The German steamer "Walkuere," which was 
sunk by the German cruisers in Papeete ("Tahiti) 
harbor a year ago while lying alongside the 
French gunboat "Zelle" which captured her, has 
been purchased by a group of San Francisco 
shipowners headed by John A. Hooper. The 
"Walkuere" will be raised and brought to San 
Francisco for repairs. 

The Pacific Alaska Navigation Company, the 
Admiral line, has been installed in its new 
San Francisco quarters at nier 24 and Captain 
R. C. Brennan of the "Admiral Dewey" had the 
distinction of taking the first vessel to the new 
dock. On the new pier, which is 800 feet 
long, the company has much better quarters than 
on pier 20, where it has been for some time. 

A new motor-ship built by Burmeister & Wain 
for the East Asiatic Steamship Company, now 
operating from Copenhagen, was successfully 
launched during the past week. She is a sister 
ship of the "Australien," which was launched 
about two months ago by the same builders. 
The new vessel, which was named "Columbia," 
will be placed in the Pacific Coast trade. 

The wooden steam whaler "Behedere." which 
left Seattle March 17 last on an expedition to 
Siberian waters to hunt walrus, polar bears and 
whales, and which, as already reported, lost four 
of her crew from a capsized boat early last 
Tune, has arrived at Nome. Alaska. She narrow- 
ly escaped being crushed in the Arctic ice, which 
all reports agree is unusually heavy for this 
sen son of the year. 

According to the September "Timberman" the 
California lumber situation shows no improve- 
ment over a month ago. Tf anvthing it is a 
little worse. The outlook for the fall is not very 
promising, and most concerns are resigned to a 
period of slack business. It is generally felt that 
until world conditions improve and conditions 
peculiar to the lumber industry become adjusted 
there can be no hone for better things. Over- 
production, a greatly curtailed consuming de- 
mand, and unwise merchandising are given as 
the chief reasons for the present dullness. 

Two coast guard vessels, laid up at San Fran- 
cisco for renairs, have arrain been placed in com- 
mission. The tug "Golden Gate" has had extra 
fuel tanks nut in so that she will have a 
steaming radius of 300 miles instead "f about 
100 as at present and so can make longer 
trips along the Coast to chase opium or coolie 
smuqrglers. The cutter "Unalga," Captain Harry 
Hamlet, which lias been on dutv at San Fran- 
cisco for two months, was ;it the United En- 
gineering Works for minor repairs to boilers 
and deck. She subsequently left for her station 
on Puget Sound. 

A suit in admiralty wps tiled in the United 
States District Court at Scnttle by the Nippon 
Yuscn Kaisha, owners of the Japanese steam 



schooner "Shiduoka Maru," against the steam- 
schooner "William Chatham" for damages aris- 
ing from a collision in Tacoma harbor Septem- 
ber 25 last, when, the libelant alleges, the 
"William Chatham" was so unskilfully navigated 
that she ran into the "Shidzuoka Maru," bending 
that vessel's beams and a number of steel plates. 
The libelant's damages are placed at $2500. The 
"Chatham" was reported as having left Port 
Angeles for the West Coast of South America 
after loading a full cargo on the Sound. 

After a journey of 156 days from the Co- 
lumbia River, the British bark "Inveresk," the 
last of the 1914-1915 grain fleet, reached Queens- 
town during the week. She was dispatched by 
Balfour, Guthrie & Co. and sailed from Astoria, 
April 15. With the last year's fleet cleaned up, 
a glance over the record shows that all but seven 
of the grain-laden vessels reached their destina- 
tion safely. The fleet numbered 102 vessels. 
Four were sunk by the German submarines 
about the British Isles, two were sunk by the 
German warships in the South Seas and one was 
wrecked in a gale shortly after she had left 
the Panama Canal. 

It was announced that the Grand Trunk Pa- 
cific steamers "Prince Rupert" and "Prince 
George" will enter the Alaska service next 
spring. The company does not intend to aban- 
don its Seattle call, but the question of hand- 
ling the Seattlc-Skagway trade will require some 
adjustment to come within the American coast- 
ing laws. Up to this summer the boats operated 
at a heavy loss. Next year the management 
expects a large tourist traffic west over the 
Grand Trunk road to Prince Rupert. From there 
the tourists will be picked up, taken to Skag- 
way and brought south to Seattle. Officials 
figure on a ten days' schedule from Chicago 
to Dawson, Yukon territory. 

The American schooner "Golden Gale," be- 
longing to the Hind-Rolph fleet, is making her 
way to San Francisco under sail from the canal, 
according to report made by the steamer "O. 
M. Clark," which arrived at San Francisco from 
Balboa during the week. The "Clark" started to 
tow the "Gate" here from the canal, but Septem- 
ber 3 the skipper of the windjammer decided to 
do without a tow, and so the line was cast off. 
Coming to San Francisco to load barley, the 
"Golden Gate" is in ballast from Montevideo. 
She was in a big blow off the South American 
Coast several months ago, and had to undergo 
extensive repairs before being able to put to sea 
again. 

The cargo of the power schooner "Archer," 
namely 584,822 feet of lumber, and her owners, 
the Tacoma and Roche Harbor Lime Company, 
have been made defendants in a libel suit 
brought at Los Angeles by the Bloedel Donovan 
Lumber mills. The Pacific Wharf & Storage 
Company have also been made a party to the 
suit. The "Archer" nearly foundered wdiile on 
her way from Puget Sound ports to Atlantic 
Coast points, was towed to safety and her cargo 
removed. It is alleged by the libelants that the 
vessel was overloaded. It is also stated that the 
cargo shifted, which was partly responsible for 
the action of the boat in weathering the storm. 
The libelants sue for the possession of the 
lumber and damages. 

On the eve of her departure from Fensacola, 
the British steamer "Strathendrick" was held up 
on a libel for $220,000 tiled by Davics and Fe- 
hon, according to information received by the 
Marine Department of the San Francisco Cham- 
ber of Commerce. The "Strathendrick" was 
chartered by this company to load in Oregon for 
Australia, but at the last moment was com- 
mandeered by the British Admiralty and could 
not fulfil the agreement. The case is similar to 
that of the "Strathesk" of the same line, which 
was chartered at San Francisco to load lumber 
at Eureka, and then at the last moment was 
rommandeered by the Admiralty and started for 
South America, wdierc a cargo of nitrate was 
taken on for the United Kingdom. 

The Alaska Steamship Company has an- 
nounced the purchase of two steed freight 
steamships for the Alaska trade — the "Benning- 
ton" and the "Burlington" — from the Rutland 
Transit Companv. subsidiary of the New York- 
Central lines. The vessels cost approximately' 
$400,000. The vessels, built for Great Lakes 
trade, are just adapted to Vlaska trade. They 
have carcro capacity each of 4000 to 5000 tons. 
Captain Fred Warner, Captain C. I'.. McMullen, 
First Officer Gus Blamberg. First Officer Ed. 
Schraker, Chief Engineer Sam Coddling and 
Chief Engineer R. B. Bruce have already left for 
Ogdensburg, N. Y., to man the steamships, 
bring them through St. Lawrence River, down 
the Atlantic and through Panama Canal to Seat- 
tle. They will have western loading from New 
York to Seattle and then will enter the Alaska 
trade at once. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants' Exchange Bldg., Th<rd Floor. Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomerv. Telephone Kearny 
394. fAdvt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 
AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 
and 
INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS- 
FEDERATION. 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary, 

570 West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass, 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway St 
NEW YORK CITY, 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St 
NORFOLK, Va., 41 Loyalls Lane. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 South Commerce St 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 12 South St. Telephone 2107 

Broad. Night Call 2108 Spring. 
New York Branch, 400 West St. Telephone 5153 
Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 258 Commercial St 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 117 Decatur St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 806 South Broadway. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 
Headquarters (temporary): 
BOSTON, Mass, D/ 2 A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
NEW YORK, 51 South St. and 280 West St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway 
NORFOLK, Va., 41 Loyalls Lane. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 190 West St. Phone 4126 Worth. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, III., 570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
N. TONA WANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 15 Twelfth St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. " 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 445 La Salle Ave. 
DETROIT, Mich., 27 Jefferson Ave. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
HEADQUARTERS: 
406 N. Clark St., Chicago, III. 
Telephone Main 365. 
BRANCHES: 
Buffalo, N. Y. Toledo, O. 

Cleveland, O. North Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Milwaukee, Wis. Superior, Wis. 

Ashtabula, O. Erie, Pa. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 59 Clay St. 

Branches: 
VANCOUVER, B. C, 213 Hasting St., E. corner of 
Hasting and Main, P. O. Box 1365, Tel. Seymour 8703. 
i 'DMA, Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 
SEATTLE, Wash., 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65. 
ABERDEEN, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 
PORTLAND, Ore., 44 Union Ave., North. 
EUREKA, Cal., 227 First St., P. O. Box 64. 
BAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67. 
HONOLULU, II. 'I'.. Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sts., 
P, O. Box 314. 

(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 
BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 
Established in 1887 



PAUL SCHARRENBERG Editor 

I M. HOLT M 



I ERMS IN ADVANCE. 

ill - $2.00 | Six months - - - $1.00 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



in advertisements must b 
ich week. 



in by Saturday 



To Insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
dress all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 

Entered at the San Francisco Postoffu-e as second- 
class matter. 

Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 

:■'< Clay Street, San Francisco. 

NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published In the JOURNAL, provided they i 

uihle. written on one side only 

paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 

iddress. The JOURNAL is not responsible for 

the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 

anuacript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 6, 1915. 



AllOUT SHIP-SUBSIDIES. 



The average American seems to have a 
rather well-settled, though somewhat hazy, 
notion that American ships cannot compete in 
the foreign-going trade because other mari- 
time nations pay a liberal ship-subsidy. 

Nothing is further from truth. Yet, con- 
sidering the vast amount of misinformation 
published upon this subject in American 
newspapers, it is not at all surprising to ob- 
serve the average man's delusion. 

American attempts to mulct the national 
treasury in the guise of ship-subsidy have 
failed so far. By all indications, however, 
the near future will see another desperate 
attempt to open the vaults at Washington, D. 
C, for the purpose stated. In view of this 
situation reliable and authoritative data ought 
to be especially welcome at this time. 

Accepting a report issued by the British 
Board of Trade, under the date of June, 1913, 
as his authority, a writer in the Century 
Magazine shows conclusively that the prac- 
tice of subsidizing ships has never created 
a successful merchant marine. 

It is true England, Germany, France and 
Japan pay subsidies in considerable amounts. 
Of these nations, however, only Japan has 
ever seemingly in this way created a mer- 
chanl marine. Japanese steam shipping 
amounted in 1905 to 900,000 tons; in 
1913 it was 1,500,000, the greater part of 
which is represented in the four great lines 
which the Government supports. Japanese 
taxpayers give to the shipping interests $7,- 
000,000 a year, but as a rule there are ii 
nificant returns in freight concessions. Yet, 
the four subsidized Japanese lines have at 
times found it difficult to compete with unsub- 
sidized English and German lines. Notwith- 
standing lower wages, the Japanese profits 
are, even under the most favorable circum- 
stances, only slightly more than those of the 
European competitors, and about half of the 
profit comes from the subsidy account. Japan 
has no tramp freight service worth mention- 
ing. Her subsidized ships travel only in the 
accustomed channels. 

France is exceedingly liberal, making pay- 
ments to steam and sailing craft and to 
vards. Since 1881 $36,000,000 has been paid 



out in subsidies. Such growth as the French 
marine fleet has made has come in the last 
ten years, when the increase was 58 per 
cent. Yet remove the two great and highly 
subsidized French lines and the French flag 
would practically disappear from the sea. In 
contrast with the French method is placed 
the Dutch. Holland pays $550,000 a year 
for mail service. The Holland-America line 
is not subsidized. The Dutch merchant ma- 
rine is almost as large as the French. Ger- 
many subsidizes only the German East Africa 
line and the North German Lloyd, paying 
SI, 750,000. The Century writer states that 
none of the great German passenger and cargo 
ships with which the American public is so 
familiar receives imperial aid; and yet the 
curious fact remains that the German mer- 
chant marine, in contrast with the French, 
has increased 100 per cent, in ten years. 

Italy pays out $4,000,000 a year for only a 
negligible growth. Norway's payments 
amount to only $450,000 a year, and the 
Norwegian fleet is larger than either the 
French or the Japanese. 

England, contrary to belief, does not have 
a general subsidy law. The account for the 
year 1912-13 stood at $3,706,654, of which 
$720,000 went to the Cunard steamships 
"Mauretania" and "Lusitania" reserve serv- 
ice. The rest of the money was for postal 
transportation between the colonies and the 
home country. The tramp and line cargo 
steamers did not receive British aid, and yet 
it is the cargo steamers which make up a 
country's merchant marine. And despite the 
fact that not a single British tramp ship re- 
ceives a shilling in subsidy, that type of ves- 
sel is able to hold its own with all comers. 

All of which ought to have a tendency to 
create a healthy and uncompromising senti- 
ment against the prospective raid upon the 
United States treasury by would-be Amer- 
ican ( ? i subsidy grabbers. 



STRIKES AND "NEUTRALITY." 



One of the most encouraging prospects of 
American life is the obedience of our people 
to I 'resident Wilson's request for maintenance 
of strict neutrality regarding the war in Eu- 
rope. And considering the varied racial and 
national components of our citizenship, we 
were beginning to believe that there was just 
cause for satisfaction with prevailing con- 
ditions. 

Recently, however, we have been subjected 
to a rude awakening, and find that we are 
the victims of a snare and a delusion. Ac- 
cording to quoted statements of some cer- 
tain prominent citizens, the only persons who 
can be neutral in the United States are those 
who will not go on strike. Any individual 
or organization who demands just conditions, 
or expects to share in the greatly increased 
profits of those industries which have been 
given impetus by the war, are considered by 
these aforesaid prominent citizens as emis- 
saries of the Kaiser. All persons who agi- 
tate for shorter hours and better conditions 
are openly declared to he the concentrated es- 
of pro-Germanism and conspirators 
against the peace and welfare of the United 
States. 

When the stock of the Bethlehem Steel 
I Corporation began to rise from $68 per share 
to its present quotation of $350, and huge 
fortunes were made over night in several 
other war stock industries, the magnates 
feared that it might be natural for the (17 
cents per hour ) workers to desire enjoyment 
of a certain amount of this prosperity. A 



means of checking such desire was therefore 
immediately put into operation. The first in- 
cipient strike of munition workers in New 
Jersey was effectively suppressed by the 
usual forces of hired gunmen and resultant 
shedding of the workers' blood. This was 
followed by a press campaign throughout the 
country, declaring that German spies were 
active in the inspiration of industrial unrest. 
This line of action upon the part of our 
patriotic capitalists has been industriously 
and energetically pursued, giving the intima- 
tion to the public that to strike at this time 
is unpatriotic and rebellious. The fact that 
200,000 coal miners in Wales went on strike 
for a reasonable share in huge profits, in 
open defiance of the so-called Munitions Act, 
but without any bloodshed, while the smallest 
protest of munition workers in the United 
States resulted in brutal usage and shooting 
of the strikers, does not seem to cause any 
particular surprise. It seems to be the ac- 
cepted order of things in certain quarters 
that the workers in the United States have 
no right to strike under any circumstances 
as long as such strike will interfere with the 
plans of the Anglo-Jap Alliance. And while 
the corporation magnates of this Republic are 
cleaning up millions from the blood and mis- 
eries of the stricken peoples of Europe, it 
is to be treasonable for the workers to 
demand a living wage or tolerable conditions. 

When a icw machinists went on strike re- 
cently at Chicago, Paul B. Goddard, presi- 
dent of the Illinois Tool Company, declared 
that "the strikes are a part of a well-laid 
plot to cripple American industries; not mere- 
ly to check the manufacture of munitions, but 
to cripple industries that contribute directly 
or indirectly to the aid of the Allies. These 
industries can be reached only through the 
labor unions." Therefore the inference of 
Mr. Goddard, that labor unions are conspira- 
cies and strikers are traitors to the country. 

Surely, the long-suffering workers are the 
recipients of more than their share of cal- 
umny and vilification from the press and 
allied corporate interests. But the many mys- 
terious and unsupported statements emanating 
from certain "leaders of labor" would seem 
to indicate that others besides the plutocrats 
are interested in the suppression of action 
and thought. If recent press statements are 
authentic, the modest sum of $1,035,000 or 
thereabout, was offered to one "leader" to tie 
up the transportation of the United States. 
Of course, we hasten to assure our readers, 
this particular leader promptly refused to 
accept the Kaiser's filthy lucre. Other labor 
leaders have told similar stories, but one anec- 
dote will suttice to illustrate the utter reck- 
lessness of the Kaiser's fiscal agents. 

At intervals we have borne in agony of 
silence the effusions of certain leaders rela- 
tive to the machinations of Austrian and 
German emissaries and their sympathizers. 
Since Ambassador Dumha's letter fell into 
the wrong hands, the emanations from the 
fertile brains of these aforesaid martyrs and 
patriots have become almost more than we 
can bear. For indiscriminate waste of money 
the Kaiser has the prodigal son backed clean 
off the boards. Just fancy offering over a 
million dollars to one labor leader, in order 
to induce him to attempt to do what every- 
body knows is the impossible. The whole 
consideration of statements such as the one 
quoted would be highly amusing, were it not 
for the fact that someone can always be de- 
pended upon to give credence to any ram- 
bling and impossible statement. 

While the freight rates have risen beyond 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



the wildest hopes of shipowners, and vessels 
are making unheard-of profits, there is little 
danger of the workers ashore or afloat re- 
ceiving any benefit from these unusual con- 
ditions if they are to be guided entirely by 
the suggestions of self-constituted guardians 
of American neutrality. It is indeed well for 
humanity that all great minds do not run in 
the same groove. The Journal is com- 
pelled to disagree with the actions and sug- 
gestions of those leaders of labor who see 
the Kaiser's shadow behind the workers' 
every legitimate demand for shorter hours 
and longer wages. If we did not believe 
that most of these expressions were actuated 
by a desire for free advertising, and the due 
impression upon unsophisticated constituents 
as to their sublime honesty, we might think 
evil of our "strictly neutral" colleagues in 
the labor movement. Under the circum- 
stances, however, we forgive them — for we 
do not believe that the rank and file of Amer- 
ican workers will ever accept the new defini- 
tion of neutrality, which is in brief: Don't 
strike, don't kick, don't growl ; in fact, don't 
do anything that will in any manner interfere 
with the Morgan-Schwab arrangements of 
greasing the skids for the Kaiser. 



A SAN JOSE DREAM. 



An esteemed San Jose, Cal., contem- 
porary calls the "Seamen's bill" a "theo- 
retical fulmination" and after relieving 
itself of considerable compressed wrath 
informs the public that "it was because 
of this law that the Dollar Steamship 
Company with its fleet of twenty steamers 
recently withdrew from San Francisco to 
British Columbia and changed registry to 
the British flag." 

My, oh my, how '.hat Dollar fleet has 
grown ! According to maritime records 
the Dollar Steamship Company never 
owned more than eight steamers at any 
one time, and never had more than five 
steamers under the Stars and Stripes. 
The records also show that only one of 
these five Dollar vessels has been trans- 
ferred to the British flag. The records 
further show that not a single American 
lost his "job" because of that transfer. 
For this so-called "American" steamship 
gave employment to aliens only, i. e., she 
had British officers and a Chinese crew. 

Talk about "theoretical Culminations" ; 
why that San Jose editor is some fulmi- 
nator himself! He ought to apply for a 
position as a lightning calculator with the 
warring nations of Europe. Xo man of his 
ability ought to remain in sleepy San Jose. 

We are truly jealous of our fellow scribe 
on the San Jose Mercury. He has shown 
us a few valuable points about the fine 
art of "seeing" things double, treble, quad- 
ruple, etc., as required. It is easy to write 
a magnificent roast if "truth" is only a 
side issue and the editor feels himself at 
liberty to disregard plain facts to suit his 
whims and fancies. 



A PROFITABLE VEXTI 



During the first year of its existence the 
War Risk Insurance Bureau of the Treasury 
Department earned approximately $1,300,000. 
Ships and their cargoes valued at about 
$80,000,000 were insured and the premiums 
aggregated nearly $2,000,000. The loss dur- 
ing the year was nearly $700,000, mainly on 
vessels carrying cargoes of cotton destined 



for neutral ports and German destinations. 
Much of the loss, it is thought, will be re- 
coverable, and, altogether, this seems to have 
been a most profitable venture. 

But is not this government enterprise bor- 
dering on Socialism ? 

Is it not giving a horrid object lesson to 
the millions of American citizens who pay 
vast sums in the shape of premiums to all 
sorts of private insurance companies? 



"THE SEA AND ITS RICHES." 



A Boston contemporary tells us how on 
one day recently the fishing craft that make 
Boston a home port landed, at the specially 
designed and equipped pier where their 
trade is carried on, 2,500,000 pounds of fish. 
Local demand, a market that includes the 
six New England States at a season when 
food consumption is high owing to hun- 
dreds of thousands of visitors, and con- 
sumers even as far south as New York and 
Philadelphia, all helped to use this harvest 
from the sea, gathered on fishing banks 
that already have been productive for sev- 
eral centuries, and that seemingly know no 
such thing as failure of supply. 

The incident — for it is just that in the 
ongoings of one of the largest fish markets 
of the world — is cited to show how unex- 
hausted the marine food supply of the race 
is, and what immense reserves exist even 
in waters conspicuous for the thoroughness 
with which boatmen of a certain type and 
of several nationalities have explored the 
resources. British, French and Yankee 
mariners have taken out of the American 
North Atlantic billions of dollars of wealth 
in the form of fish. For the fishing rights 
within this most productive area human 
sacrifice has been made, treaties have been 
manipulated, and nations have been in con- 
troversy — an era, however, happily now 
past. Kings, premiers, presidents, secre- 
taries of State and arbitrators have come 
and gone. Tariffs have been raised and 
lowered. Cities and towns and provinces 
have had their days of prosperity and ad- 
versity, according as diplomacy and na- 
tional conditions and relations affected the 
fishing rights of various groups. But all 
the time, and never more so than now, not- 
withstanding all men's mechanism for en- 
larging the hauls and seemingly plundering 
the deeps, the teeming ocean has brought 
forth its wealth of food supply. 

If this be the record of the water long 
fished in, what of those North Pacific wa- 
ters thus far hardly touched, and of the 
great Hudson Bay area which Canada has 
in reserve? The practical problem is not 
one of shrinking supply of the wealth on 
which the race may maintain existence, as 
urban growth, congestion of population and 
growth of industrialism lessen steadily the 
laud area set apart for food supply. Rather 
it appears to be a question of continued de- 
velopment of the kind of men needed for 
the experiences involved in the fisheries, 
and of saving the business of marketing 
the sea food from falling into the hands of 
men that would gamble and speculate and 
monopolize after the manner of so many 
that deal in the products of the land. 



Mi 



DIED. 

Alfred li Rcichel, No. 1200, a natn 
' lermany, age 23. d, < )re , Si 

21, 1915. 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 4, 1915. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. in., E. A. Erickson presiding. Secretary re- 
ported shipping dull. The Quarterly Finance 
1 ommittee elected to examine the Union's ac- 
counts for the past three months, reported hav- 
ing found same correct. Twenty-five dollar- 
was donated to Schmidt & Caplan defense fund. 
Andrew Furuseth addressed the meeting, and 
stated he would leave for Chicago on Wednes- 
day, f (ctober 6, 1915. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, Secretary pro tem. 

Maritime Building, 59 Clay St. Phone Kearny 
2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Sept. 27, 1915. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects poor; 
few men ashore. 

REGINALD TOWNSEND, Agent. 
Room 11, De Cosmos Block, 1424 Government 

St. 

Vancouver, B. C, Sept. 27, 1915. 
Shipping dull; prospects poor. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
213 Hastings St., E. corner of Hastings and 
Main. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Sept. 27, 1915. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 27, 1915. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Sept. 27, 1915. 
Shipping medium; prospects poor. 

T. PEARSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Sept. 27, 1915. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
44 Union Ave. North. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Sept. 27, 1915. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping and pros- 
pects poor. 

JOHN ANDERSON, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 27, 1915. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
12SV 2 Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 

67. Tel. 137 R. 

Honolulu Agency, Sept. 20, 1915. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping and pros- 
pects poor. 

TACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Sept. 30, 1915. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order 
at 7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping slow. Thomas Ellis was 
elected delegate to attend the convention of the 
California State Federation of Labor, 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

42 Market St. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 23, 1915, 
Shipping slow. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203. P. O. Box 214. 

Phone Main 2233. 

Portland Agency, Sept. 27, 1915. 
No meeting, Shipping poor; plenty of men 
ashore. THOMAS BAKER^ Agent. 

89 Second St. N. Thone Broadway 2306. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 1, 1915. 
Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7:30 
p. m., Chas. F. Hammarin presiding. Secretary 
reported that all vessels with tin- exception of 
I lie Karluk, Alitak and Loring ships had am 
home, an exceptional poor catch for the Kwi- 
chak and Naknek Rivers, and fair catches for 
the Nushagak, Egegak and Ugashik Rivers, also 
fair catches in Central and Soul \l.iska 

■ reported 14 deaths in Alaska during sea- 
son for 1915, of which eight lost their lives by 

I n'ng. 

Resolution to vote upon a question of appro 
ling $1500 to he used by the International 
Seamen's Union of America for organizing pur- 

•- was unanimously adopted Ballot on 'his 
(ion were east, and will be continued in the 
ings. 
u lar I inani e Committee was el 

! d to the Wireless 

iW out on stril 
Herman Twedt, Chas. F. Hammarin and f. X. 

II will represent the Alaska Fishermen's 
Unio ition of the California State 

I abor, which convenes at Santa 
T. I V, Secretary. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



THE DANGEROUS CLASSES. 



We are indebted to The New Republic 
for several quotations that are herein used. 
They are particularly appropriate at this 
time when there are thousands of men 
without employment and with little chance 
that they will have employment. 

Business in war munitions and its cxten- 
have added considerably to our vol- 
ume of business, but the demand is for 
skilled workmen rather than common la- 
borers; while it is true there is increased 
activity in industry it is equally true that 
there arc too many men out of wurk to 
insure the peace of mind of the comfortable 
classes. 

The helpless despair that accompanies in- 
ability to provide for one's self and family 
is not understood by one who has never 
experienced it. There are some things that 
cannot be realized without experience and 
even then, when they do not affect us per- 
sonally, we do not quite understand the 
depths of misery that follow certain hap- 
penings. 

We always express our sympathies when 
we feel something should be said that will 
show our interest and feelings in the mis- 
fortunes of our friends and while we are as 
sympathetic as we know how and honestly 
try to be, we know we do not feel as badly 
as we would if the same thing happened 
to ourselves and, even then, we do not 
understand unless it happens to us. 

What docs it mean to be out of work, 
homeless and hopeless, condemned to wan- 
der from place to place, with little hope 
of work and wages, and what more does it 
mean to the man who leaves a family desti- 
tute while he does his best to earn a living 
for it and finds nothing to do? Is it any 
wonder that such men are desperate, that 
they accept any chance that offers for their 
temporary advantage? Is it any wonder 
that now and tin if them purposely 

will violate the law for the simple sake of 
being relieved of his own care during the 
time he is in jail or the workhouse serving 
his sentence: And. when these unemployed 
men, made desperate by conditions that 
are no fault of theirs, get together it is no 
wonder they feel the protection and sympa- 
thy of companionship of their kind and 
become radical in thought and act. Then, 
we refer to them as the dangerous classes. 
They are dangerous from the viewpoint of 
those who are better off; they may decide 
that they were put into the world to live-, 
nol to die without a chance, and they some- 
times show a disposition to take by force 
the chance that was denied them, but or- 
ganized society is composed of a larger 
number backed by greater resources and 
it squelches the danger in its own way, 
which never assists the man out of his 
troubles. 

There has been a disposition to belittle 
tlie number of the unemployed and to as- 
sert that the situation was exaggerated, but 
investigations have proved that the number 
was underestimated. Of this situation we 
quote from the New Republic: 

"Those reckless demagogues who recent- 
ly proclaimed that three hundred thousand 
workers were idle in Xew York City must 
realize to-day how timid is mendacity, for 
their 'wild exaggerations' have proved to be 
gross underestimates, and the truth is far 
worse than they ever dared imagine. We 
have now before us the results of three 
independent investigations — by the Mayor's 



Committee on Unemployment, the Metro- 
politan Life Insurance Company and the 
Lnited States Department of Labor; and 
these investigations show that in the early 
months of 1915 from four hundred to four 
hundred and forty thousand wage-earners 
in the city were simultaneously unem- 
ployed, to say nothing of those workers 
who were kept on part time or were em- 
ployed irregularly. The detailed figures, 
as presented in Bulletin 172 of the Bureau 
of Labor Statistics, are infinitely depress- 
in-. But they arc worth careful study. 
The only reassuring feature of this hideous 
revelation is that at last we seem willing 
to face facts and to study the problem of 
unemployment as it recurs year after year, 
in bad times and good. 

"And yet as we console ourselves with 
this reflection we wonder how much of this 
new solicitude about the unemployed is due 
to our sympathy and how much to our 
fear. We have had unpleasant meetings 
of the unemployed, and have been dis- 
quieted because these jobless men broke 
into our churches and our newspapers, and 
crashed through the glass of those hot- 
houses which we call our private con- 
sciences. We know, of course, that they 
are weak, and that a platoon of policemen 
with nightsticks could handle hundreds of 
them. But we also know that it is the 
weak who are formidable. It is from this 
fringe of our economic population, so we 
are told, that 'the dangerous classes' are 
recruited. 

"We have always marveled at this con- 
fident phrase, 'the dangerous classes.' It 
seems so completely to explain itself, to 
preclude all discussion of values and in- 
terpretations. And yet who arc the dan- 
3? Why are they dangerous, 
and to whom? . . . 

"If such men are dangerous it is because 
they are at once without habits and with- 
out hope. Society never totally fears the 
man with a steady job, however infertile. 
for such a man is a slave to habit. When 
the employed man awakes in the morning 
he does not think of brawls and revolu- 
tions, but of breakfast and his daily task. 
He moves to his work in obedience to a 
habit as unconscious and ingrained as that 
which forces you each morning to put your 
left shoe on first or to button the buttons 
of your vest in some particular unreasoned 
succession. Even the slave is held as much 
by habit as by force. But the unemployed 
man. if he is unemployed lon.^ enough, 
tends to become habitless, as he also tends 
to become hopeless. He has no reverence 
for a government under which he starves, 
or for a social system into which he does 
not fit. Despite his weakness, he is danger- 
ous, and it is well that he is dangerous. 
For if he were not dangerous we should, 
despite our philanthropy, let many more 
men and women rot in the streets or in 
the foul little holes that our official reports 
call 'dwellings.' If the unemployed were 
still more formidable, we should have long 
since learned how to help them — and our- 
selves. 

"In ancient Rome, as in Athens centuries 
before, the wealthy met this danger by cor- 
rupting the unemployed, by buying them 
off with presents of grain and oil and even 
of clothes and money. Rome thus com- 
pounded its unemployment. And if Rome 
bribed, Europe, in the late middle ages and 
in more recent centuries, assassinated its 
unemployed. The able-bodied rogues who 



festered in filthy alleys or marched in 
troops along the highroads were recognized 
as intrinsically perilous to all 'good peo- 
ple,' and were accordingly set in the stocks 
and condemned to have their ears hewn 
off or their noses sliced and on the third 
offense to be hanged by the neck. Life in 
the middle ages was secure for the masters 
and artisans of the guilds, but outside was 
an increasing number of miserable souls 
who existed at their own peril. If you 
were unfortunate or improvident enough to 
he without place in the economic structure 
of the middle ages, you were not unlikely 
end a short and a miserable life. In 
those days the stolid burghers had a tough 
conscience, a clear sense of their own worth 
and of the worthlessness of the wretched, 
and a quick and a merry way of dealing 
with the unemployed. 

"We to-day have no such clear con- 
science, no such absolute judgment, and we 
can no longer believe that these 'danger- 
ous' unemployed men are wretched because 
they are evil. We have been taught the 
dismaying doctrine of social responsibility, 
and it becomes increasingly difficult to ab- 
solve ourselves from moral liabilities which 
once seemed remote. We have learned still 
other things, to our mental discomfort 
though not to our hurt. One is that men 
cannot decay in society without healthy 
men dying of the decay. The other is that 
iniiot destroy a class either by bribery 
or assassination, and cannot attempt either 
policy without undermining the morality of 
the entire nation." 

And, while there is discussion, little has 
come out of it. It resembles a peace con- 
ference of the uninterested during a time of 
war, a splendid opportunity to make speech- 
es and give advice that every one knows 
cannot be followed, for the simple reason 
that the ones needing it the most have the 
least use for it. 

( >ne great trouble with us, we have too 
many theories and too much insistence that 
each theory is the only one; intolerance and 
indifference have done more to hamper 
progress toward settling our social prob- 
lems than anything else. Everybody is 
wrong but the man with his own plan for 
doing the right thing. The main criticism 
to he found with all of the plans for prog- 
ress is that each on< more calcu- 

lated to work to the advantage of the one 
who has it than it is intended to benefit 
society as a whole. We are a nation of 
many people and many minds and herein 
show one instance at least that there is not 
much wisdom in a multitude of counsel. 

Tlie Xew Republic sums up the situation 
as fi illows : 

"We are far away indeed from even an 
approach to a solution of the unemployed 
problem. While we suggest broad schemes 
for industrial change, we find even the 
most obvious and immediate reforms — those 
which cost little and will effect correspond- 
ingly little — opposed by conservatives on 
tlie grounds of economy, personal liberty, 
the Bill of Rights and Magna Charta. We 
speak of great transformations of society, 
but find it almost impossible to get a sys- 
tem of labor exchanges or government in- 
surance of the unemployed, to say nothing 
of such a thoroughgoing regulation of in- 
dustry as would decasualize labor and give 
stability to the wage-earning group in all 
indusl 

"In view of the difficulty of securing even 
the mildest measures of reform, because of 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



the indifference of the people who do not 
know what they want and of the obstruc- 
tion of the people who do, the phrase 'the 
dangerous classes' is not free from am- 
biguity. We wonder who were the danger- 
ous people in the England of the Tudors ; 
the sturdy rogues, who tramped along the 
highroads and did some stealing and worse 
and were hanged by the neck until they 
were dead, or the loyal and conservative 
gentlemen of England who 'legally' en- 
closed the common lands and thus filled the 
roads with more vagrants than all England 
could hang." — The Railroad Trainman. 



THE CAVE MAN'S CREED. 



We are constantly being told that war 
is the supreme test which proves whether 
or not a nation is fit to survive. That out 
of it come those types which alone are 
fitted to continue the work of procreating 
and perpetuating the human race. It is 
the doctrine of Might is Right. It is the 
application to human kind of the principle 
which governs the animal life of the jungle. 
Now whichever view a person may hold, 
it will at least be conceded by all that the 
first requisite for strong and healthy chil- 
dren is strong and healthy parents. So if 
war produces strong and healthy men, it 
will justify itself so far as that part is 
concerned. 

But does war make strong and healthy 
men? Just at present we are able to look 
at this matter from a very practical stand- 
point. If a man wishes to go to the war 
and offers himself as a recruit, his enthu- 
siasm for the fight is only a secondary con- 
sideration in deciding the question of 
whether or not he will be accepted. The 
first thing required is perfect physical fit- 
ness. His wind and limb must be sound, 
his eyesight keen, and in every bodily re- 
spect he must be the kind of man who, 
from an eugenic point of view, is physical- 
ly fit to perpetuate his kind. The weedy, 
the wilted, and the weakly are not ac- 
cepted. The result is that if the war is 
of the magnitude of the present one, thou- 
sands of physically fit men are killed, and 
thousands more are broken and maimed 
so as to be unsuitable types afterwards for 
the work of reproduction. 

The plain object and result of war is to 
kill healthy men. It does not seek the 
survival of the fittest, but their annihila- 
tion. That is perhaps even more true in 
these days than in Roman times. The 
bodily strength of the individual had more 
to do with victory then than it does to- 
day. Men were killed by the strength of 
men. Today they are killed by the per- 
fection of applied mechanics. It took a 
strong man to carry a heavy shield and 
armor and wield a battle-axe. But it does 
not require a Goliath to work a Maxim 
gun, which will kill more men in ten min- 
utes than a man could kill with an axe 
in ten weeks. 

So that instead of modern warfare pre- 
serving the fittest from death by reason of 
their superior strength, it slaughters them 
under conditions where their strength can- 
not be used for their protection. As war 
is carried on now it does not, therefore, 
eliminate the unfit types. On the contrary, 
it ensures their survival by keeping them 
out of the conflict. And to them, along 
with the fit types who do not go to war, 
the work of reproducing human kind is 



left. That means that the proportion of 
unfits in the community is greater than 
before. Looking at it from a purely utili- 
tarian standpoint, that is the real result of 
war, despite all the specious arguments and 
sophistry put forth by the "blood and 
iron" school. They are the pests of the 
earth, hovering like vultures wherever 
peaceful men and women are striving to 
purge the race of the cave man. In peace 
they produce nothing. In war they destroy 
everything. They are the arch-parasites 
of the age. — J. W. W., in British Colum- 
bia Federationist. 



"SOLE SALVOR" REWARDED. 



Writing in "Case and Comment" of 
steamship salvage cases George L. Canfield 
of Detroit says that occasionally a pas- 
senger may be the sole salvor, as in the 
"Great Eastern," 2 Asp. Mar. L. Cas., 148. 
This ship was in her day the largest of 
the Atlantic passenger steamships. During 
a voyage in September, 1861, her rudder 
was disabled and she lay quite helpless in 
the trough of the sea for several days. All 
the devices of the master and engineers 
failed to steer her and her situation be- 
came very dangerous. Among the pas- 
sengers was a civil engineer who then pro- 
posed a plan of his own and it was adopted 
by the master with the result that the ship 
successfully reached port. The court 
awarded the passenger $15,000. But this 
case would not warrant any general rule 
that every passenger who assists in ac- 
complishing the safety of his ship will be 
treated as a salvor. One essential ele- 
ment of salvage service is that it is volun- 
tary ; that is, outside of what one is bound 
to do. Now, up to a certain point, the 
maritime law requires passengers to work 
for the safety of the ship if a common 
danger arises. In such a situation, where 
all are in peril, it becomes the duty ' of 
each to render all the assistance he can. 



FISHERIES SERVICE BULLETIN. 



The Bureau of Fisheries of the Depart- 
ment of Commerce is now issuing a Fish- 
eries Service Bulletin, a monthly publica- 
tion designed to acquaint the employes 
of the bureau at Washington and in the 
field with the workings of all branches ot 
the service. In an organization as exten- 
sive as that of the Bureau of Fisheries it 
is a difficult matter for the individual em- 
ployes to keep in touch with the work of 
the organization as a whole, especially 
when a large proportion of them are in the 
field, and it is thought that this condition 
of affairs can be remedied to some extent 
by publishing a monthly bulletin devoted 
to changes in personnel, disciplinary pro- 
cedures, departmental and bureau orders, 
movements of vessels, new constructions, 
publications, outlines of fish-cultural oper- 
ations and of field and laboratory investi- 
gations, movements of officials, personal 
services of a particularly worthy character, 
civil-service examinations, fishery matters 
before Congress, and current fishing and 
fish-cultural news of special interest. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



Sweden's imports of raw cotton during 
the first quarter of 1915 amounted to 123,- 
443,400 pounds, against a total of 16,860.000 
pounds in January-March, 1914, and 17,- 
■ll f ),600 pounds in the corresponding 
mi mths of 1913. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above stated 
reasons, or because of rules of the so-called 
"Welfare Plan," by any agent or represent- 
ative of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied concerns, including the 
masters and officers of the ships. 
Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 

LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 

570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 

BRANCHES AND AGENCIES: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 15 Twelfth Street 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

HEADQUARTERS : 
71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 445 LaSalle Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS: 
406 N. Clark St., Chicago, III. 
Telephone Main 365. 
BRANCHES: 
Buffalo, N. Y. Toledo, O. 

Cleveland, O. North Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Milwaukee, Wis. Superior, Wis. 

Ashtabula, O. Erie, Pa. 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

MARINE HOSPITALS: 

CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 



KKI.IKK 



Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
Escanaba, Mich. 

I Haven, Mich. 
I Bay, Mich. 
Hon Men, Mich. 
I.udlngton, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 

Pa. 
Menominee, Mich. 



STATIONS: 

Ogdensburg, N. Y 
Oswego, N. Y. 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

iglnav 

i adusky, O. 

Sri ult Htc. Marie, M 
Sheboygan, Wis. 
Superior', Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



or loaded) shall be paid for on at least an 
equal basis as is paid for the coal. 

9. We demand a readjustment of the 
machine mining scale to the extent that 
equitable rates and conditions shall obtain 
as a basis for this system. 

10. We demand that the arrangement 
of detailed wage scales and the settlement 
of internal questions, both as regards prices 
and conditions, be referred to representa- 
tives of the operators and miners of each 
district to be adjusted on an equitable basis. 

Probably the most important of these 
provisions in the effect they will ha. 
future conditions in the anthracite field are 
demand- for full recognition, a speedy sys- 
tem of settling grievances and the last de- 
mand that detailed matters shall be worked 
out in each district by conferences of local 
operators and miners. 

l'.\ this last clause. President White has 
eliminated from the negotiations with the 
operators questions of comparatively minor 
importance, which in themselves might in- 
terfere with a settlement, and has insti- 
tuted a system to bring operators and 
miners into a closer relationship for mutual 
understanding and voluntary arbitration of 
matters peculiar to the districts. 



Illinois Assembly — N. G. 
The Joint Labor Legislative Board of 

Illinois has issued its report concerning 
efforts on their part to secure beneficial 
legislation for the workers from the 49th 
Illinois General Assembly. It is in part 
as follows: After most strenuous efforts 
we secured 20 favorable pieces of legis- 
lation on minor matters. The Legislature, 
however, was more easily influenced by 
corporation interests ami as a consequence 
20 of the most important measures to la- 
bor were defeated. Those measures were: 
I 1 i anti-trust and injunction limitation bill; 
(2) the 7? ear limit hill; (3) the initiative 
and referendum; (4) constitution conven- 
tion: (5) the gateway amendment; (6) 
nine hours for women; (7) the full crew 
hill; (8) the child labor bill; (9) one day's 
rest in seven bill; (10) uniform text book 
bill; (11) women's minimum wage; (12) 
old age pensions; (13) engineers' license; 
(14) wages as a preferred lien; (15) free 
text hooks; (16) weekly pay day; (17) pro- 
tection for compressed air workers; (18) 
workers protected from extortion; (19) 
working day of 10 hours within 12 for 
street-car workers ; (20) compulsory com- 
pensation for injuries. The Joint Com- 
mittee feels justly indignant with the inef- 
ficient, ill-balanced, corporation representa- 
tives who posed as State legislators at 
Springfield the last session. 



Typhoid Will Claim 200,000. 
The typhoid fever season is again at 
hand, according to an announcement by. the 
United States Public Health Service, and 
during the coming year probably no less 
than 200,000 people will contract this dis- 
ease. About 18,000 of these will die, in the 
opinion of officials, who have made public 
a statement designed to draw attention 
to the fact that the fever is a disease of 
filth and can be avoided by proper pre- 
cautions, as scientific knowledge of the dis- 
ease is most complete. The report says 
the death rate since 1900 has been reduced 



by half, but it still remains much higher 
than that of countries "which we are apt 
to consider less civilized than our own.'' 

In deferring to the 18,000 who will pos- 
sihly succumb, it is stated that 50 per cent, 
of these will be between the ages of 15 and 
35 years, and that no sooner is the compu- 
tation of the 18,000 completed than another 
series is begun and so on interminably. 
The report says the fever can only be con- 
1 by taking into the system the waste 
products of one previously ill of the disease. 
These waste products are conveyed from 
one individual to another usually by means 
of a third object, such as water, tlies or 
milk. 



Railroad's Vast Earnings. 

Last winter the Pennsylvania Railroad 
led the fight to repeal the Pennsylvania 
full crew law, which is intended to protect 
the lives of trainmen. Legislators were as- 
sured that railroads in that State are nearly 
at the "breaking point - ' because of such 
"unnecessary legislation." 

The bill was repealed, but the repealer 
was vetoed by the Governor. 

With these facts in mind, trade-unionists 
are pointing to this announcement, made 
last week: 

"for July the operating profits of the 
Pennsylvania Railroad system show an in- 
crease of SI. ''05,036. That increase nearly 
equals the gain for the whole first half of 
the year, which was $2,102,089. 

"for July the railway operating income, 
or, stated otherwise, the profit on opera- 
tions, was $9,797,177. For seven months of 
the year it was $38,546,492. 

"The Pennsylvania Railroad system is 
now doing a gross business at the rate of 
$400,000,000 per annum. The greatest sys- 
tem gross earnings were for 1913, being 
for that year $392,436,000. For July the 
total revenue was $33,197,016, or $1,132,382 
more than for that month last year." 



Organizing Central Bodies. 

In conjunction with the general organ- 
izing campaign that is being so persistently 
conducted, American Federation of Labor 
officials are appealing to unionists in hun- 
dreds of localities throughout the United 
State- and Canada to form central bodies. 

In a letter to these workers, Secretary 
Mi 'rrison writes : 

"Not only must our individual members 
unite in their respective trades, but like- 
wise our unions should combine in a Cen- 
tral Labor Union. In urging the forma- 
tion of a Central Labor Union, J do so 
in the interest of the development of your 
local movement so that each union may de- 
rive the fullest possible strength and sup- 
port therefrom. In cities where we have 
a Central Labor Union it has been fully 
mstrated that it affords a place where 
the affairs of labor can be discussed, ad- 
vice given one another, each trade being 
thereby in a position to act in a co-opera- 
tive manner with its fellow trade-unions. 
Your union should realize that it cannot 
gain the greatest protection and highest 
benefits for its membership by maintaining 
an independent or isolated position, which 
j is the state of affairs in your locality. His- 
tory has demonstrated that the most pro- 
gressive cities in the United States and 
Canada are those that have a live, up-to- 
date, energetic Central Labor Union. There 
must be systematic, persistent, united effort, 



and there is no better method of develop- 
ing this feeling of brotherhood than 
through the instrumentality of a good Cen- 
tral Labor Union." 



Poor Children Sacrificed. 
1 )r. Louis I. Dublin, a member of the ad- 
visory council of the New York Board of 
Health, in the last issue of the Board's bul- 
letin, gives some startling facts regarding 
the mortality of the children of the poor. 
lie says: The lives of the poor children 
are blasted before they are born, due to 
the fact that the mothers must help earn 
a miserable living. It is evident that the 
infants of these mothers show a much 
higher death rate than do those of mothers 
engaged in housework only. That these 
conditions play a part in mortality, both 
during infancy and later, is plainly evident. 
The highest death rates are found in the 
wards of cities where poverty is most com- 
mon ; the converse also holds good. This 
has been demonstrated in Johnstown, Pa., 
where the low family income and high in- 
fant mortality are clearly demonstrated. 
It was also further confirmed in an in- 
vestigation at Fall River, where a group 
of 72 fathers was interviewed, employed 
in the textile industry, earning an average 
of $10.22 per week. The wives of 27 per 
cent, of these fathers were engaged in work 
outside their homes. Dr. Dublin continued 
nrvey in that city and discovered that 
the mortality among 833 infants, born there, 
showed a death rate of 202, a rate more 
than twice as high as that recorded of a 
number of the large cities. The cause of 
the slaughter of the infants is plainly evi- 
dent. 



State Federation Convention. 

The Maryland State and District of Co- 
lumbia Federation of Labor held a five-day 
session in Washington recently. There 
were 150 delegates present. The conven- 
tion was opened by Secretary John B. 
Colpoys, of the Washington Central Labor 
Union. After a few remarks he introduced 
President Gompers, who spoke briefly, as 
did also Secretary Morrison. Jackson II. 
Ralstan, of counsel for the A. F. of L., and 
Secretary Spencer, of the Building Trades 
Department, also addressed the convention. 

President John H. Ferguson then as- 
sumed the chair and the business of the 
convention commenced. One of the im- 
portant resolutions acted on was that giv- 
ing free text books to the children of the 
high schools of the District, and authorizing 
a committee to prepare a bill to present 
to Congress for the purpose of securing 
the necessary appropriation to make such a 
law operative. A large number of addi- 
tional resolutions were acted on favorably. 

The delegates were banqueted by the 
plate printers Wednesday evening, a num- 
ber of invited guests being present beside 
the delegates. 

The officers chosen were : President, 
John H. Ferguson ; recording secretary, 
Henry J. Hardy; secretary-treasurer, John 
A. Banz, and delegate to the A. F. of L., 
P. J. Ryan. 



Only 64,977 carats of diamonds were ex- 
ported ' from British South Africa during 
the first four months of 1915, whereas in 
January-April, 1914, there were 1,524,649 
carats exported, and 1,802,126 carats in the 
like period of 1913. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



'ONLY ONE BRAVE AND HONOR- 
ABLE MAN IN LAST CONGRESS." 



To prove the above proposition may be to 
assay something of a task, but the burden 
will be well borne and the reward will be 
ample if it can be established that we of the 
First Congressional District have in our midst 
that one brave and honorable man. Just 
think what a distinction that is to the First 
Congressional District of Washington. 

Now let's see if it can be proven. 

In the Post-Intelligencer and the Seattle 
Times last Sunday there appeared three col- 
umns of a statement by Congressman Humph- 
rey concerning the Seamen's bill. Among 
other things he said : 

The enactment of this law was almost a crime. 
It was the Crime of Cowardice and not of ig- 
norance. 

The bill in practically the shape that it passed 
has been before Congress for many years. All 
who wanted to know its. provisions had been 
given the fullest opportunity. 

Those who voted for it did not follow their 
judgment, but their fears. They dared not stand 
against the power that was behind. 

When it was up for passage in the House of 
Representatives I stood practically alone in my 
light against the Seamen's bill. 

Whereas, Our Congressman cannot lie ; 

Therefore, He was the sole and only mem- 
ber of Congress who combined within his 
own self the two attributes of honor and 
bravery. Let no one challenge our "There- 
fore," for in so doing what becomes of our 
"Whereas"? — James W. Bryan in Navy Yard 
American. 



SPIGOT ECONOMY. 



The attempts of the British Government 
to economize in public expenditures, that 
resulted in the laying off of 1,700 persons 
engaged on the land valuation, still troubles 
the admirers of real democratic England. 
The great fundamental principle involved 
in the famous budget of 1909 depends for 
practical execution upon this land valuation. 
And it has been the expectation of many 
that the Government, in its present strait, 
would have recourse to this great fund to 
defray the expenses of the war. But that 
there has been a turning aside from this 
purpose would seem to be indicated by the 
present move. For the Government to stop 
the salaries of the clerks and others en- 
gaged in this great work, while allowing 
to run undiminished the enormous pensions 
of former Government officials, is most dis- 
quieting. George Lansbury, speaking of 
these pensions in the London Herald, says: 

"Ex-Lord Chancellors all take their 
£5,000 a year. Dear old Lord Halsbury, 
who in nine years has drawn a total of 
£45,000 as pension, still continues to econ- 
omize by taking £5,000 a year as a re- 
ward for about ten years' service at £10,- 
000 a year, which means he has taken a 
total of £145,000 for ten years' work and 
nine years' rest. This kind of statement 
can be multiplied many hundred times over 
— retired judges, retired viceroys, retired 
generals, and so on — which would give us 
a total running into millions a year for 
pensions and allowances, every penny of 
which must in one form or another be paid 
by labor and by labor alone." 

It is to be hoped that protesting labor 
will soon be able to make its voice heard. 
Patriotism is an admirable thing, when 
accompanied by wisdom and a sense of 
justice; but the man who is called upon 
to lay down his life for his country should 
see to it that the Government that calls him 



is worthy of the sacrifice. If such pen- 
sions as Mr. Lansbury names were ever 
justifiable, they certainly are not at a time 
when the country is fighting for its life. 
And to continue such unreasonable ex- 
penditures, while at the same time curtail- 
ing the work that is being done in the 
interests of the common people, is alto- 
gether inexcusable. It savors too much of 
the time-honored method of the tory 
bureaucrat who gives his attention to stop- 
ping the drip at the spigot, while per- 
mitting the flow at the bunjr. — The Public. 



HOW IT WORKS. 



To be without visible means of support, 
subjects one nearly everywhere to danger 
of prosecution. At the same time the law 
is very careful to shut men off from the 
means of supporting themselves. How this 
works out is shown in the following sketch 
from the May-June issue of The Single 
Tax Review of New York, by Harry Wein- 
berger, an attorney of that city : 

Place — City of New York, where vast tracts 
of land are allowed to be kept idle. 

Scene — Magistrate's Court. 

Time — Present. 

Characters — Judge, first Policeman, second Po- 
liceman, two prisoners, driver of a wagon, ped- 
dler. 

Judge — What is the charge? 

First Policeman — Cruelty to animals, driving a 
sick horse. 

Judge — Guilty or not guilty? 

Driver — Guilty. 

Judge — $5 fine for cruelty to animals. Don't 
do it again. Next case. What is the charge? 

Second Policeman — Peddling without a license. 

Judge (to prisoner) — Don't you know that if 
you want to peddle in the City of New York 
you must have a license? 

Peddler (sick and emaciated) — Yes. But, your 
Honor, they do not issue any more licenses to 
peddlers. To buy a license from someone else 
costs too much. I can't afford it. 

Judge — I cannot help that. The law says you 
must have a license to peddle on the streets of 
Xew York City. 

Peddler — Yes. but I can't get a license, and 
I can't get a job. What am I to do? 

Judge — I don't know. I am here to enforce the 
law. 

Peddler — You tell me that I can't use the pub- 
lic streets of New York City like everyone else 
because I am peddling something. I can't get a 
job and I can't pay my rent. What am I to 
do? 

Judaje — You will have to pay $5 fine. 

Feddler — T haven't got it. 

Judge — Five days in jail. 

What is the moral? Oh, nothing, only 
that all laws must be enforced, with exact 
justice — it is not illegal to keep land idle, 
though idle land means idle men — and sick 
animals must be protected. 

The name of almost any other city might 
ne substituted for that of New York with- 
out lesseninsr the force of the moral. 



Labor's Economic Platform 



SULPHUR IN NEW ZEALAND. 



Sulphur deposits are found on White Is- 
land, in the Bay of Plenty on the coast of 
the North Island of New Zealand, about 30 
miles from the mainland. This island, 
which covers about 600 acres, attains a 
height of 900 feet on one side and opens 
to the sea on the other. Its topography 
indicates an old crater, and the boiling lake 
on the island, which is one of the awe- 
inspiring sights of New Zealand, is a fur- 
ther evidence of volcanism. After the New 
Zealand Sulphur Co. had spent $100,000 in 
preparation for mining sulphur in this lo- 
cality, a volcanic disturbance wrecked the 
camp and killed ten men. 



Organization is a lever which can move 
world. 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntarv 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes. 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 

seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

DnDnDnnnnnaannnnnnnDDnnDnnnnDDDnDa 

International Seamen's Union 
of America 



(Continued from Page 5.) 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 58 Commercial St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1408'/ 2 Western Ave., P. O. Box 
875. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 242 Flander St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., 613 Beacon St.. P. O. Box 574. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 
•SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 42 Market St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Pier No. 1, Room 63, P. O. 
Box 211. 

PORTLAND, Ore., Room 10, BIckle Bldgr., 27H 
Second St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 54. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases! 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 40 Clay St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash., st Seneca St., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA. Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

DDDDannLnnnnnDnnDannDnnDcxiDaDDnaDD 

The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be I » «t 

any of the above-mentioned places; 
>ters of the 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



L 


abor 


N 


ews. 





The knitters employed bj B 
Sons Co., of I3ristol, Conn., demand- 
ed an increase of 15 cents per hun- 
dred pounds of yarn. The demand 
was refused and a strike resulted, 
causing a cessation of work. The 
previous price was $1.70. P.y the 
settlement the men will be paid $1.80 
per hundred pounds of yarn. 

A broad construction has 
placed by Attorney-General Turner 
of Ohio on the constitutional pro- 
vision providing an eight-hour work- 
day for all employes engaged in 
public work, and the penal provisions 
for violations contained in the law- 
passed in l f H3, and which did not be- 
e operative until July of this 
year. The law automatically puts 
thousands of employes in State, city, 
county and township work under the 
provisions of the eight-hour day. 

Compulsory education will be< 
an actuality in Alabama as soon as 
rnor Henderson attaches his sig- 
nature to a bill which passed the 
Senate by a vote of 23 to 5. The 
same bill previouslj passed the house. 
The bill makes it compulsory for 
children between the years of 8 and 
IS to attend school at least seven 
weeks in the year: it also makes it 
illegal to employ a child between 
the years named. The only States 
nol having compulsory education are 
Mjssissipi and Georgia. 

American Federation of Labor or- 
ganizers, James E. Roach and Mrs. 
Mary Sculley, have succeeded in or- 
ganizing 10,000 men and women into 
the various unions formed at B 
port, Conn. For days they were 
constantly on the go, attending meet- 
ings and conferences with commit- 
tees of strikers. In response to an 
urgent appeal from New Haven, they 
extended their work to that city, and 
during a brief stay organized addi 
tional unions, bringing the total up 
ti> the number named. Their activ- 
ities are being continued and a fur- 
ther increase is expected. 

The Machinists' Union of Balti- 
more has complained to the munici- 
pal water board that working condi- 
tions are unsatisfactory, and present 
a series of demands, among which 
are the following: Witnesses for 
men when up on charges; cessation 
of charges and arraignments without 
trial: helpers taken off of machinists' 
work; recognition of shop steward 
and shop committee selected by the 
men of the shop. The machinists 
state that some of the tools and 
machinery is out of date, and that 
the superintendent "made slaves of 
his men" and then charged them 
with not getting out as much work 
as they should. 

The Labor Review of Minneapolis, 
Minn., vouches for the truthfulness 
of this story: The Milk Wagon Driv- 
ers' Union was organized three years 
ago with dues of $12 per year. In 
the three years which have elapsed 
since the union was organized, the 
wages of the members have been in- 
creased on the average to the amount 
of $240. Total dues paid per mem- 
ber for the three years is $36; $240 
is 6661-3 per cent, dividend on the 
investment of $36. In addition to the 
benefits in wages, the drivers have 
secured the advantage of fourteen 
days off during the year with pay. 
The union recently signed an a 
ment with the employers which calls 
for an advance in wages of $5 per 
month. This is one of many in- 
stances indicating the large financial 
returns wdiich result from a progres- 
sive, militant union. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Office Phone 
Elliott 135 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-date methods in Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy. 
Compasses adjusted. 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



PIER NO 1. 



Established 1890 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pol* 
SEATTLE, WASH. 



ALASKA HOTEL 

CORNER WESTERN AVENUE AND 

SENECA STREET 

New Building — New Furniture 

26 cents and up per Day 

Special Rates Per WeeV 

FREE BATHS 

PETER DESMORE, Proprietor 

SEATTLE 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 



Pho e Main 1202 

L. V. WESTERMAN 

CLOTHIER 

FURNISHER and HATTER 

ALASKA OUTFITTER 

220-222 First Avenue South, at Main 
SEATTLE 



Eureka, Cal. 



MERCANTILE LUNCH 

Is the place for a good and quick service 

233 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 

Teddy $ Hagan 

Proprietors 



BONNEY-WATSON CO. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 

NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH 
Four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor In New York Nautical College. 

Room 4187 ARCADE BUILDING 

Next Room to Masters, Mates and Pilots 

Association 

SEATTLE, WASH 



WWWWVWVS^S/rfVWS/VWWWWVW^WS 



Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mall forwarded 
during that period, they should notify 
,nt to hold mall until arrival. 

Abrahamsen, Mann, Einil 

Halptan Mover, Wm 

Andersen, Hjalmar Martensen. Ingoald 

Andersen, P. T. Martensen, Knist 

sen. Bernt Martinsohn. P. A. 

Brower Geo Mathlsen, Martin 

Hurkna'm, J. W. Mathlsen, Sigurd 

Carlson, Herbert McNiell, Ross 
Chrlshansen, TrygoeMoen. Tryger 

tensen Anton Mortensen. J. H. 

Ohudelow, Geo. Mikkelsen. K. -1620 

Edvords, John Moore, C. R. 

rs, John Nass, T. M. 

Kneebretsen, Ed. Nelsen, Oscar J. 

IMv.nlsen. Anton Noherelt, Gust 

Edson, Frank Nygaard. Oluf 

h. Peter T>. Olsen, C. E. 

Gilbert, Arthur Olsen, Edwin 

Glademo, Lars Olsen, O. 

Oundersen, Peter Olson, J. E. 

Oustafson. Karl Olson. E. -9Sfi 

Hansen, Alex M. Olsen. Harald 

Hansen, John Olsson. C. 

Hntton. Pete Pestoff. Sam 

Hughes. W. L. Petersen, A. -1223 

Hansen. C. Petersen. Hugo 

Howard, Geo. Petterson, Harry 

Jakobson, Walde- Petersen. Cnrl M. 

mar Oualns, Nick 

.Tansewitch, John Quigle, R. E. 

Jensen. Oscar Ouielev. Tom 

Jensen, S. Ramherg. Barney 

Johnson. Ed. Renstrom. A. G. 

Johnson. Emil Roos, Axel E. 

.Tnrtrensen. Fred Sole. Erling 

.Tneobsen. Tenglls Sohwelstous. W. 

Johanson. Wm. Shankat. Hans 

Kalning, Jaeob SimmlnghHm. G. 

Larsen. Alhln Speller. Henry 

Larsen, John Stone. C. T.,. 

T.arsen. Pete Telohert. Karl 

Larsen, K. -1560 Thomsen. Elnar 

Larsen, I* A. Thompson, Pete 

Larson. Olaf Torlnsen. O. T. 
Leirdman. C. H. O. TTrsln. Johannes 

Leonard. John Veekenstedt. Blllie 

Lnndberg. C. Waagen. C. O. 

T.'itten. Theo. 'Wall. W. 

Mlones. John Wetland. John 

Tacoma Letter List. 

Cords. W. A. Olsen. Martin E. 

Evertsen, Olof Paterson. John 

Farrell. William Person. Fritz Leo- 

Haugan. Arthur nard 
Johannsen, ChrlstlanSchmidt. Louis 

Linea, W. Thomas. Paul 

Line, Wictor Ullman, Emil 
Murphy, Panial 

When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 
Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire- Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Carl Kristianson, who shipped on 
the bark "Nuanu" in September, 

1912, from Honolulu to San Pedro, 
was on the bark "Allen" and 
schooner "Repeat" previously. Any- 
body knowing his whereabouts please 
notify his mother, Mrs. Anna Kris- 
tianson, Majornas, Route 6, M. 27, 
Lilla B. Nystrama St., Gothenborg, 
Sweden. 5-13-14 

Frank Melson, who went as fire- 
man on the S. S. "Maye" from Phila- 
delphia to New Orleans, in May, 

1913, is inquired for by his mother. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify Mrs. G. W. Paruin, 
4309 Westminster avenue, W. Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

George Barrett, who, on November 
12, 1912, left the ship "Port Logan" 
at Newcastle, of which he was an 
apprentice, is inquired for by his 
mother, his father having died. Any- 
one knowing the whereabouts of this 
lost son please at once communi- 
cate with Amelia Barrett, 1 Wood- 
land Place, East Greenwich, Lon- 
don, England. 3-3-15 

Otto E. Bickel and John Sherman 
Bickel, brothers, who have not been 
heard of for many years, are in- 
quired for by their sister. They are 
both tall, light complexioned, and blue 
eyes. Any information regarding 
their whereabouts will be highly ap- 
preciated. Please address Miss Laura 
Bickel, 1591 East Ninety-third street, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 4-14-15 

Fred Riley, a colored seaman, last 
heard from at Genoa, Italy, and at 
other times from ports in Australia 
and at Liverpool, England, is sole 
heir to his mother's estate. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts kindly no- 
tify Mr. John E. Selkirk, Attorney- 
at-Law, 100 Erie Co. Bank Bldg., 
Buffalo, N. Y. 6-24-14 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 

Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

612 Fourth St. - - Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNO 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



— For i — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

— or — 

A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 
EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



SAILORS' OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS, 
SAILORS' SINGLETS 

Everything Union Made 

PAGE & SCHWARTZ 

Cor. Second and E Sts., Eureka, Cal. 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading; Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. 8WANSON. Prop. 



Eureka, Cal., Letter List 

ras, Julio Lawrence, Harry 

Briksen, Anton Lomas, Richard 

Kyrkslatt, Lars Xilsen, Nils 

M< Keating, R. Thorsen, Fredrick X. 



STATEMENT OF THE OWNERSHIP, 
MANAGEMENT. CIRCULATION. ETC., 
REQUIRED BY THE ACT OF AU- 
GUST 24, 1912, 

ist Seamen's Journal, publ 

weekly at San Francisco, California, for 

i ictober l. 1915. 
Name i Postofflce Address. 

ml Scharrenberg, San Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

Managing Editor, Paul Scharrenberg, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

Business Manager, I. M. Holt, San Fran- 
Cal. 

Publisher, Sailors' 1'nion of the Pacific, 
San Francisco, Cal. 

:s: i if a corporation, give its name 
and He- names and addresses of stock - 
i ilders holding 1 per cent, or mOl 
t' tal amount of stock. If not a cor- 
poration, give names and addresses of 
Individual owners.) 

Sailors' Union of the Pacific, San Fran- 
.isrn, Cal. 
Known bo mortgagees, and 

othei holders, holding i 

i i nt. or more of total amount of 
bonds, mortgages, or other securities: 
i if there are none, so state.) 
None. 

I. M. HOLT, Business Manager. 
Sworn to and subscribed before me 
this 23rd .lav of September, 1915. 

MARGUERITE S. BRUNER, 
Notary Public in and for tic City 
and County of San Francisco, State 
of California. 
(My commission expires January 8th, 
1918. 
Form 3526. 

DDDDDnaDcdDDaaDaDDrjjDnDnan 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Johan Hilmar Hansen, a seaman 
who was last heard from in Seattle, 
Wash., in 1911, is inquired for by his 
father, Anton Hansen, Nygaten 34, 
Moss, Norway. 5-13-14 

Alex McDonald, formerly of Dun- 
dee, Scotland, who has not been 
heard of for 22 years, but is thought 
to be sailing on the Pacific Coast, 
is inquired for by Jas. Perry, 30 
Bridge End, Buckpool, Buckie, Eng. 

5-13-14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 



Portland, Ore. 
WM. JOHNSON 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 

For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - • PORTLAND, ORE. 

□□□□□annnnnannnnLxnnDnoDao 



NEW AND SECOND HAND 
CLOTHING 

WEINER'S BARGAIN 
HOUSE 

Shoes, Hats, Suitcases 

Furnishings and Tools 

French Dry and Steam Cleaning 

UNION SHOP 

35 NORTH THIRD STREET 

Corner of Cauch PORTLAND, ORE. 



P. ROSENSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers in 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes, Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing, Trunks, Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnslde, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. Main 8295 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 



SQUARE DEAL 

RESTAURANT 

Best Meals on the East Side 

$5.50 Meal Ticket for $5.00 

Phone East 406 

371 BURNSIDE STREET 

PORTLAND - - OREGON 

CON. SILVER, Mgr. 



Willamette Cigar Store 

H. SORENSEN, Proprietor 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, 

CONFECTIONERY, FRUIT AND 

SOFT DRINKS 

Corner Front and Burnside, 

Portland, Ore. 

□QannnaonaoannnnnnDnoncDOQ 
Portland, Or., Letter List. 



Bese, F. 

Bernahrdsen, Chas. 
Bjornlund, Axel 
Bugge, Mr. 
Christensen, H. P. 
Decas, O. 
Dolany, Willie 
Edstrom, John 
Ekberg, Hugo 
Fernandez, Frank 
Geiger. Joe 
Hecker, Wm. 
Halbeck, J. O. 
Holmstrom, Chas. A. 
Henriks, Waldemar 
Ingelbrigsten, O. 
Jensen, Christ 
Jensen, Wm. 
Jegstrup, Harold 
Johnson, Nils 
Jonsson, Karl 
Knopp, Fritz 
Kristiansen, Wm. 
King, J. L. 
Kelly, Patric 
Kjer, Magnus 
Knudsen, Richard E. 
Larsen, H. 
Leonhard, George 
Letchford, A. 
Lindblad, Konrad 
Lindberg, A. C. 
Lindholm, John 
Loescher, Joseph 
Miller, E. 
McKeating, R. 
Munchmeier. H. 
Miller, Andy M. 
Morgan, Tim 



Muller, P. 
Metts, John 
Moller, L. D. 
McConnell, David S. 
Mark, Thorwald 
Meckermann, Ernst 
Neuling, George 
Nielsen, H. -1253 
Olsen, Arthur 
Ohlsson, J. W. 
Osterberg, Henry 
Oglive, Wm. A. 
Palm, P. A. 
Pedersen, J. A. 

-1515 
Perkins, Paul 
Peterson, M. 
Rabel, John 
Reskran, George 
Rinkel, H. 
Rimmer, Chas. 
Schneider, J. 
Schneider, Fritz 
Swanson, Emil 
Soderlund, Uno 
Sorensen, Jorgen 
Shea, Oscar 
Schacht, H. 
Schultz, John N. 
Selin, Joe 
Salmelin, H. 
Saarinen, W. 
Tuhkanen, J. J. 
Urso, Geozzep 
Vinr, H. 
Windblad, M. 
Wheatcroft. L. E. 
White, Harry 
Westengren, C. W. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Albers, Geo. L. 
Andersen, -1118 
Arntzen, W., reg. 
Andersen, Andrew 
Arnell, John 
Burmeister, T. 
Byman, Alf. 
Bjorklund, G. 
Bowen, J. J. 
Davis, Frank 
Eriksson, -333 
Evensen, Krist 
Gustafsson, Chas. 
Gronros, Oswald 
Gueno, Pierre 
Hansen, -2275 
Hansen, Halfdan 
Holmroos. W. 
Hansen, Ove Max 
Hylander, Gustaf 
Jacobson, J. 
Kallas, August 
Kerr, Win. 
Knappe, Adolph 
Kristiansen, Nils 
Kustel. V. J. 
I -ad wig. Otto 
Ludtke, Emil 
Machado, Henry 
Munsen, Fred 



Nielsen, N. C. 
Nilsen, -1054 
Nilsen, Harry 
Nordgren, Chas. 
Peitson, J. 
Peters, Walter 
Paaso, Andrew 
Pettersen, Karl 
Petersen, J. 
Peterson, Xels 
Risenius, Sven 
Runrlblad, Oscar 
Schmidt, Heinrich 
Simensen, Isak 
Scheftner, Bernimrii 
Thorn, A. L. -70 
Toves, H. C. 
Thorne, John 
Thompson, S. K. 
CJdby, Harold 

man, John 
Wiksten, Arvid 
Wilson. John 
Walder, Olsen N. 

Packages. 
Glazer, Y. 
Gorgensen. Olaf 
Hansen. John 
MacGuire, O. F. 
Stanners, W. S. 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 




Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 
DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 
no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treat. 



DDnDDnnDnDDODDnDnnnnaanannnDnnnnnnnnnnDannnnnnnnDnDna 



a 



VOTE AGAINST 






Union 

MADE 

Seer 




Tvie 

AND 

Porter! 



i*5&5V Of America ric^r 

COPTRICHT &TRAPE MARK RE6I8TERED 1908 I 



PROHIBITION 

DEMAND 

PERSONAL LIBERTY 

IN CHOOSING WHAT YOU 
WILL DRINK 

Ask for this Label when 

purchasing Beer, Ale 

or Porter, 

As a guarantee that it is 

Union Made 



THIS IS OUR LABEL 

DnnnDnDDDnDDnDDannnnDDnannnnnnnDnnnnDnannnnanDnnnnDan 



Aberdeen, Wash. 



HUOTARI a CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



When in Aberdeen Trade at 
BEE HIVE 

Very best union made Hlckey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, 
Shoes, Underwear, Beddings, Tobac- 
cos, and notions for seafaring men. 
NYMAN BROS. 
304 South F St., Aberdeen, Waih, 
Near Sailors' Union Hall 
Open Evenings 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES, COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS, SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



TO LET 

Very Desirable, Light 
and Roomy 

Stores and Basement 

— in the — 

Maritime Hall Building 

— on — 

49-59 CLAY STREET 

Between Embarcadero & Drumm Sts., 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Apply to I. N. HYLEN, 49 Clav St. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Iwar Westerberg, age about 50, 
sailing second mate on some steam 
schooner on the Pacific Coast, is in- 
quired for by Gus Englund. Any in- 
formation regarding the above named 
will be gladly received at 214 Jack- 
son street, San Francisco, Cal. 

1-27-15 

Theodore Krakan, last heard of in 
September 1911, at New Orleans, La., 
is inquired for by his mother. Any 
one knowing his whereabouts please 
notify Mrs. Ad. Krakan, Langenvehm 
38 I, Hamburg 22, Germany.— 8-25-15. 



Port Townsend, Wash. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively in Union -Made 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

Water Street, Port Townsend 

Next door to Waterman & Katz 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Ingvald Andreas Hansen, alias 
Andrew Hansen, a native of Nor- 
way, age about 36; tall, dark; last 
heard of July, 1905. His address 
then was, Andrew Hansen, Karluk, 
Kodiak Island, Alaska. He is in- 
quired for by his mother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify Staff Captain Robert Smith, 
district officer, native work, Alaska, 
Box 925, Wrangell. 4-3-15 

Wilhelm Ekelund, a native of 
Sweden, is inquired for by his 
brother. Axel Ekelund, New Harbor 
Hotel, Drumm street, San Francisco, 
Cal. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify the above ad- 
dress. 3-10-15 

nnaDnnnnnDDnDDDDDnDnDanDDn 




NAVIGATION! 




/ - 



This Book Free 

If you want to know more 
about Navigation, we will 
send this book free to you. 
It tells how young men have 
advanced to better positions 
— how they have climbed 
from small beginnings to 
the highest positions of 
master and officers of sea- 
going craft. It is an inspir- 
ing booklet. 

Mark and mail this coupon 
today. 



♦ international correspondence schools • 

Box 898, Scranton, Pa. * 

* Please send me your free booklet, explaining , 

# Coursci in Ocean, Coast, and Lake Navigation. # 

♦ Name • 

♦ i 
tSt.&No — ♦ 

* City 



H 


ome 


N 


ews. 





State_ 



American bankers are said to have 
agreed to loan Great Britain and 
France $500,000,000 to re-establish a 
credit basis in the United States. 

The New York State census shows 
a population of 9,773,817. New York 
City has 5,066,222, an increase of 
300,661 over the Federal census of 
1910. Manhattan borough shows a 
decrease of 187,481. 

Immigrant aliens admitted to the 
United States during July numbered 
21,504; emigrant aliens departed in 
July, 9,861. The total immigration 
for the year ending June 30, 1915, 
was 326,700, as against 1,218,480 for 
1914. Emigrants departing in year 
ending June 30, 1915, were 204,074, 
as compared with 303,338 in 1914. 

New Orleans and the Mississippi 
gulf coast wire swept by a tropical 
hurricane on September 28 that 
demoralized communication and led 
to loss of life and property. The 
.Mississippi River levees below New 
Orleans were broken, houses were 
washed away and a number of lives 
lost in that section. 

A special election called by the 
Legislature resulted in 42 of the 44 
counties of South Carolina voting 
for prohibition. Many of these 
counties had experimented with the 
dispensary plan and found it want- 
ing. The prohibition act goes into 
effect throughout the State on Janu- 
ary 1, next. Twenty-nine South 
Carolina counties are already "dry." 
At the San Francisco municipal 
primary election Mayor Rolph was 
returned to office for another four 
years with the largest vote ever cast 
for a candidate for mayor in the 
Golden Gate City. The vote cast 
for the three leading candidates was 
as follows: Rolph, 63,814; Eugene E. 
Schmitz, 36,006; Andrew J. Gallagher, 
15,924. Rolph's majority over the 
combined vote of all his opponents 
was 4,571. 

It was made known through nu- 
merous channels early in the week 
that the Washington administration 
was favorable to the consummation 
of the loan sought by the Anglo- 
French Commission now in this 
country. The President and the Sec- 
retary of the Treasury are repre- 
sented as being entirely in sympathy 
with the project as one that will be 
of great benefit to American in- 
dustry and commerce while serving 
to stabilize foreign exchange. 

At an immense mass meeting in 
Chicago last week a nation-wide cam- 
paign against the Hoard of Education 
and in favor of the Chicago Teach- 
ers' Federation was Started. The 
meeting was held under the ausp 
of the local Federation of Labor, and 
was addressed by 1'resident Gom- 
pers, President Walker, of the State 
Federation of Labor; President " 
Patrick, of the Chicago Federation 
of Labor, and Louis F. Post, Assist- 
ant Secretary of the Federal Deparl 
ment of Labor. 

Judge Hennings of the Circuit 
Court at St. Louis, Mo, refused to 
grant an injunction to the restaurant 
employers of St. Louis in their effort 
op picketing of waiters and 
waitresses, where Local Unions 
20 and 24') were conducting a strike 
for the union shop. This decisio 
Judge Hennings has Keen helpful to 
the interests of the waitresses. Many 
restaurants have since been union- 
ized, shorter hours have been ob- 
tained, and wages ba\ e b. en in- 
ed foi I • i. mi ant employes. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




The barkentine "J. B. Rabel" has 
been sold by Swan & Son, of New 
York, to R. J. Diaz, of Pensacola. 
She is of 389 tons, and was built at 
Columbus Falls, .Me., in 1 

The schooners "Hattic H. Bar- 
bour," ".Minnie Slauson," "J. Arthur 
Lord," "Jennie A. Stubbs'' and 
"Peter C. Schultz" have been sold 
by Stetson, Cutler & Co. to New 
York parties. 

The steamship "Ultonia" left Gal- 
■n recently for I. a Pallice with 
1,500 army horses. In addition to 
the horses, the steamer has a quan- 
tity of frozen meat in transit from 
Xew York to Liverpool. 

The Maine Central steamer "Sap- 
pho," formerly employed on the 
Rockland-Bar Harbor route, but 
which has been out of commission 
for the past year, has been sold to 
the well-known Boston junk dealers, 
J'erry, Buxton & Doane. Altl 
2 ( ) years old, the steamer is in very 
fair condition. 

Since the loss of the "Skidby" on 
Sable Island, a period of ten years 
elapsed before another vessel came 
to grief. Following the recent wreck 
of the "Silver Wings," another vessel 
has stranded there, the latest victim 
of tiie treacherous sandbars being 
the Norwegian motor bark "Lota," 
from Philadelphia for Marseilles. The 
- • may lie saved. 

The three-masted schooner "Daniel 
Bailey." built in 1904, and owned by 
the Tremley Transportation Co., 
Boston, has been sold to Capt. Scott, 
of Key West, Fla., and will be placed 
in the lumber trade in the Gulf of 
Mexico. The "Bailey" has been en- 
gaged for some time in transport- 
ing chemicals between Gresselli, X. 
J., ami Bos 

^s an outgrowth of the seizure of 
the "Dacia," carrying a cotton cargo, 
suit has been tiled at Fort Worth, 
Texas, by Tom B. Owens, shipper 
of 11,000 bales of the cargo, to re- 
cover $172,000 damages. The Provi- 
dence-Washington Marine Insurance 
Co. was named as defendant. Ov 
share of the cargo was valued at 
more than $500,000. 

Two men were killed by gaseous 
fumes from lily bulbs aboard the 
Holland-America liner "Ryndam" at 
lloboken. George Trossit, a steward, 
26 years old, and William Leerhoven, 
a coal passer, 32 years old, were the 
men killed. When they were missed 
no members of the crew could be 
got to volunteer to go down into 
the hold. The police were notified 
and a sergeant and three policemen 
hurried to the boat. The policemen 
i he two men out of the hold, but 
a Hoboken fireman who went down 
after the missing men was overcome. 

The new L". S. submarine boat 
"M-l" was launched at Quincy, 
Mass., September 14 for account of 
the Electric Boat Co. The new craft 
is the largest submarine yet launched : 
for the U. S. Navy and measures 185 
feet in length and will have a radius: 
lion of 5,000 miles at 16 knots. 
The displacement under water is said ' 
to be 740 tons and the armament , 
will consist of four torpedo tubes 
besides small guns. The "M-l" is 
said to he a real sea-going submarine ' 
capable of operating in conjunction 
with a fleet of ordinary warships, ] 
but this, of course, is more depend- j 
ent upon the reliability of the en- 1 
gines than upon anything else and 
experience has proved that so far 
the U. S. Navy does not possess an 
absolutely reliable type of motor for 
surface cruising. 



LOOK!! LOOK!! LOOK!! 

White Palace Shoe Store 

L. WEISS 

Union Made Shoes for Men 

Exclusively 

28 EAST STREET, near Market, 
Opposite Ferry Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 1619 
Repairing Done While You Wait, by the Latest 
Machinery. :: Work Called For and Delivered. 

WE USE ONLY THE BEST LEATHER MARKET AFFORDS 




SPECIAL NOTICE! 

Call or send for your Advertised Mail 
PacKages as early as possible. 



and 



San Francisco Letter List. 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
("nion Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mail Is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
I. M. Holt. Headquarters Sailors' Union. 
Shi Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 



Abbors, Arne 
Abmeyer. Henry 
Acorn, Albert 
s, Hugo 

on, Fritz 

Aim. Jack 
Ahlfors, Arthur 
Ahokos, Ilmori 
Akman, Joseph 
Albert. J. 
Aimer. John G. 
Andersen, Alfred 
Olal 

n. A. M. 

Andersen, Emanuel 
Andersen. H. J. 
-1620 

sen, John 
Andersen. N. -1549 
Andersen. Otto 

sen, S. A. -1642 
, sen, V. -992 
Anderson, A. -1060 

Baardsen, Tellif 
Backman, Axel 
Backman, Aug 
Backman, Paul 
Bakkenson, P. J. 

Pakk" Haakon 
Ban, Martin 
Barrell. George 

... W. 
Baxter, Ed 

iult . Carl 
car 
Belloma, Werner 
BenBen, I. -2164 

Renter, H. 
Rerklinrt. fins 
Kerry. David J. 



Chr. - 

K.I 

Km st 
Fritz 

Oust 



1765 



Anderson, 
Anderson, 
Anderson, 
Anderson, 
Andei 

[arry 
Anderson. H K 
Anderson, llil.ling 
Anderson, John C. 
Anderson, Joseph 
Anderson, ' 'scar 
Anderson. Walter 
Andrensen. Karl 
Amlreassen, H. 
-1177 

V. 

II. -1372 
Antonsen, H. -1783 
Antonson, Viktor 
Ashlund. Jas. II. 
Augustin. Herm urn 
Azevedo. Manuel T. 

strom, Artur 
Blair, Francis 
Bluine, Earnest 
Blum. Ernest 

i in S 
Rowman lack 
Boyee, Allan 
Bracker, Henry 
Brandt, B. 
Bredemeyer. Elmer 

H 
Broberg, Charles 
Brown, Jno. 
Brown, William 
Brunst, Frank 
Bruum, Aksel 
Ruokly, J. J. 



Rertelsen, Krlstlan Buhl.-. Charles 



esen, Olof 
Beyerle, Rupert 
Bledeman, Aug. 
Bllke, E. -2049 
Caen. P. 

n, George I. 
Calson. Frpd 
Campbell, P. C. 
fnmphell. 8. 
Campbell. Martin 
Cariera, Peter 
Carlson, A. E. 
Carlson. C. O. 
r-nrlson. C. R. 
Carlson, Joe 
Carlson, Julius 
Carlson. Martin 
Carlsson, John 
Catt. Frederick 
Dahlkvlst. Fred 
Daly, John 
Daniel, J. C. 

.hi. David 
Danielson. Frio 

William 



Andrew 
Bush. II. S. 

, Ovia O. 
Byloff. Charles 
r»ll»n. John 
Christensen. Hans 

I ,. P. 
Clans. John R. C. 

en, Cha 
Clausen. Chr. 
Clausen. I. 
Collier. H. S. 
Comstedt. Ernst 

in, R. A. 
Costantinos. Lay 
fnuntedt. Frnest 
Crawford, F. 

Perengowski, Julius 
Dewetrak. C. 
I Ixen, Ben 

in, John 
l 'ouglas. G. Sam. 
Doyle, Win. 



I . Freltas, J. Tnacio trocar. Fd. 
i, Alfred Dully, John 

Denis. I. 

Farllng. Gua Ellefsen. Otto 

F.bersole. R. E. Filing-sen. Fr«"» 

Fchlln. Pester W. Fmanuelsen. Karl 



Eckart, T. G. 

Rckstrand. Frank 
Eckstrora, George 
Edolf, C. 
Egenas, Nils 

ihart. N. 
Eklund, John A. 

ius, Axel 
Eliassen. Sigurd 

Fade, S. C. 

ott 
Falcon, M. 
Fane, James 
Ferenson. P 
Fischer. P. 
Fitzgerald. Wm. 



Engelhardt, Ferdi- 
nand 

Enstrom, Carl 
Erickson, Bert J. 
Erlckson. E. R. 
Erickson. George 
Erickson, John 
Evansen. T/Ouis 
Evertsen, Olaf 
Foster. Chas. 

Iholm. Chns. J. 
Fredrikson. Berger 
Fredrlckson. F. 
rg, Peter 
Friberg, Frank 
Friedrich, H. 



Fitzpatrlck. Potrlck Frier. W. 
Follan. Thomas Funk. Bnrno 

Forde. S. C. Furlong, Peter 



Oahrielsr-n, Peder 

i er, Jas. 

Girt. Genrpe 

i . Fritz 

Horner, Hans 

James 

Gilbert. A. 

t, Henry 

'•.ov.len. Geortre 
Gortensen, Robert 
('■rant. 1 >a vc 
Grantley, C. W. 
i Irantstrom. Nestor 
Oronthal. Arthur 
Gross, Ernest 



Gudmundsen, B. 
Gudmundsen, P. 

Gumas. Nicholas 
Gunderson, Kristian 
Gundersen, P. I. 
Gunderson, G. A. 
Gunderson, J C. 
Gunderson. M. 
Gunther. Hans 
.Irisen. I. 
Gustafson, Gus 
Gustavsen. O. 
Guthre. R. 
Gutman. C. 



Reinliold 
k, O. 

Kail. H. 

Halvarsen, Henry 
Hammergren, Oscar 

llannus. Alex 
Hansen. Charlie 
Hansen, C. M. 
Hansen, P., -17?.."> 
Hansen. 1 lans M. 
Hansen. Hans O. 
Hansen, H. C. 
Hansen, H. P. 
1 

n, L. P. 
. M. -'"'.-< 
Hansen. Norkard M. 
1 1 . P. 

Thomas 
irold 
n Henrik 
Hays, With 

Karl 
Hawkins. F. 
Hedenskog, John 

ikcincm. Joe 

■■tsen. Olaf 

Jackson, Peter 
Jaklsh, Max 
Jakobsen, Alfred 

m, Jonas 
laroslnskl. Fellks 
Jensen, Carl 

i. C. 
Jensen. H. 

n, Hans 
Jensen. Halfnrd 
Jensen. Henry 

ck 
.. Knud 
Thoyus 

Jespersen, Martin 

Johansen, Pari J. 
Johansen. Fritz 



Kaleva, Gustaf 

Alex 

i -346 
On. Wiktor 

Kasoe, Theodore 
Kayser, ('has. 
Kearns, N. 
Kingstrim, G. G. 
Klnlock, Wm. 
Kipste, Chas. 
Kirrovvskv, Adam 
Klebingat F. 
EClelshman. Frank 
Klepzig, Otto 

l.aakso, Frank 
Pake, Andy F. 
August 

a. A. C. 



Laroen 

I.arsen. 

I.arsen. 
I^arson, 

l.arsson, 



Finwald 

J. -1386 

John 

Julius 

L. K. 

Pete 
Alfred 

S. G. 
Karl 
K. K. 



on, Ragnar 
Pangworth. ll. E. 
I. aula, Victor 
Laurltzen, Geary 
Paursen, Chris. 
I.avvson, J P. 

lln, Martin 
Peep, Gus 

nlE, H. J. 
I. eon hard, G. 

I .n rs 

Maki. Ivar 
Ma Hand, O. 
Manse, p^ter 

Markus, Geo 
Marmlon, J. 
Marquels. Frank 
Martenstn, J. C. 

"I'll 

z. Paul 
Martin, A. 
Martin. H 
Martin. John R. 

Marx, Thorwald 
Mathiassen, Sigurd 
Malta. Humherto 
Mattson. Charles 
YTattsnn. J 

McKenzIe, John 
M.-K.nzio. M. C. 

. A. 
X".lsen. John B. 
Wilson, Niels 
Nelsen, Albln C. 
Nelson. Albert 
Nelson, Alvln 
Nelson. C. 
Nelson. Fred 
Nelson, John 
Nelson. John B. 
Nerby. Kristian 

ike. Karl 

n, C. 
Nielsen. Fdwln N 

II F. -1195 
Nielsen, Nils 



Heiberger. M. 
Hein. M. 
Heinen, Charles 
Hejen, H. 
Helander, John 
Heldt, Charles F. 
Helin. John 
Helsten, Gustaf 
Henriksen, T. 

Henriksson, John 

Higgins, F. 
Hilderbranch. A. 
Holberg, <duf 
Holmqulst. F. 

Holm, Arthur 
Holmes, Chas. P. 
Hoist, p 
Hoose, Frank 
Hord, Charlie 
Hoversen. Carl 

Hubertz, Emil 
Hubner, C. F. W. 

Insunso. Francisco 

Johansen. Johan 
ten, s. a. 
lolianson. Edward 
.son, 11. i: 
nson, Nathaniel 
nson, Nils 
Johansson. J. R. 
.lohiis.n, . 

Johnson, i 
Johnson. E. G. -327 
Johnson. Eric 
Johnson. Gus 
Johnson, Henry 
Johnson. John 
.Tones. Rerfhrm 

Jorgensen. Fred 
Junghere. P. 
Junge. Heinrich 

Klotzke. Otto 
Knohl, Pouie 
Knappe, Adolph 
Knudsen. Daniel 
Konslatin. Anlst 

.1. A. 
Kornor. Fred 
Koso. Petter 
Krish.ian. Kill 
Krlst'-nsen K D 
Kristlansen, Jakob 
Kruk. J. 
Kuhn, John 



Peverrldge. H. 
Lewald, Harry A. 
Lewis Robt. W. 

Lindekrantz, F. 
Lindenkrantz. Chas. 
Llndh, Nils \'. 
Llljendahl, Pudvig 
Pindroth. Erik. 
Pink. Geo. 
Livingston, Edward 

J. 
Pjung. Gustaf 
Loine. Axel V. 
Poland, Dudwlg 
Lonau. John 
I. oren tsen, Karl 
Porin, C. -1444 

Pundberg. Cliarles 
Lundberg, Torsten 
Pundgren. Colmar 
Lundstrom, John 
Punsmann. Henrv 
Putjen, Valdeman 
Pybeck. Thomas 
Pyneh, James 

McPaughlin. M. 
M Million, Jack 
Melslahn, ll. 
Melba, Chas. 
Menk. Billy 
Mertensen, Henry 
Meyer. Frnest 
Meyer. F. 
Meyers. Mas 
Michaelsen, Johan 
Miller. Winford 
Moore. Albert 
Morgen. P. 
Mortensen, i 
Mortensen, M. I'. 

Mulh-r. T'.orn 
Muntsu, Max 
Murphy, J. 

Nielsen. Valdemar 
Nfemeyer. Oscar 
Nilsen. Hans I.. 
Nilssen. Harry 
Nllsson. Hialmar 
Nonberg, Gustaf 
Nor. Niels 
Nordlof. Sigurd 
Norman Olaf 
Norris. N. A. 
Norton. Edgar 
Nunner. Albert A. 
Nurme. Victor 
Nvman. r»«lrnr 
Nyross, Julius 



Oberg, Oscar 
ii. K. F. 

.), Chas, 
Ulenian, Henry 

in, Carl 
Olrlen, I. S. 
Olsen, B. O. I* 
Olsen, C, 1315 
Olsen, Charles A. 
Olsen, F. -1249 
Olsen, G. N. 
olsen, o. W. 
i ilsen, Ingvald 
Olson, Iskar 

J. A. 
Olsen, John Arthur 
i Hsen, John 
Olson, N. -502 

O. -1283 
Olsen, O. 
Para, E. H. 
Paul, George 

i an, Geo. 
Paulsen, A. 
Paulsen. Aksel 
Paulsen, N. 
Paultin. Martin 

on, Fred 
Pedersen, carl 
Pedersen, H. -1560 

en, P. -896 
Pergher, Charles 

• n. John 
Peters. Wm. 
Petersen, Hugo 
Petersen, Niels 
Petersen, O. -1595 
Quigley, Robert E. 
Raalsen, F. 

i. Henrik 
Randolph. J. S. 
Hank. W. 
Rasmussen, J. A. 
Keinhai.lt. Werner 
Relnhold, Krnst 
Reinlnk, Herman 

leek, llj. 
Retail, Otto 
Rickes, G. S. 
Rlmmer. C. M. 
Rlnta, Karl 

n, Henning 
Ingo 

i s, Robert 
Sanders. S. 
San. 1. -vs. .n, Alfred 
Sandstrom, Ivar 
Sass, John 
Saunders. James 

, Roland 
Saxby, C. ll. 

\. O. 
Schelenz. Charles 
Schmehl, Jas. P. 
Schmidt, Emil 

It, Pouis 
Schmitt, F. 

lder, H. 
Schroder, Willy 
Schuldt, Teodore 

</.. F. J. 
Scott, A. 
Sellers, Wm. G. 
Siknian, A. 
Slvers, Frank 
Simonsen. S. -204C 
Slnnott, Nickolas 
Skoglund, Harry 
Slinning, John 
Smith, Donald 
Smith, P. K. 
Smith. Lyman M. 

r, G. 
Soderberg, R. 



a. O. B. 

" . G. J. -1189 
Olsen, Ole, -1047 
Olson, C. E. 
Olson, C. O. -705 

J. 
Olson, Morten 
Olson, Nick 
Olson, P. 
Olsson, Adrian 
m, A. V. 
' ilsson, A. W. 
Olsson, B. O. S. 

-1284 
Olsson, Polph 

. Eric 
Olsson, James 
orlllng, Oust 
Osterman, Oscar 
Owen, Fred 
Petersen, Otto 
Petersen, C. V. 

-on, L. -1389 
Peterson, O. 
Peterson, Oscar 
Peterson, Tom 
Peterson, Wm. 
Petersson, C. -1301 

nrad 
Pinkiert, C B. 
1'lom. Charles 

Plottner, Alt 
I'oknandt. H. 
Pommer. Jon 
r, F. A. 
Preusse, Fred 

iius, Aug 
Punls. Antoni 
Quinn, William 
Ritcher, J. 
Rivera, Ben 
Rivera, John 
Roberts, Griff 
Roberts, John 
1 itz 

an, A . A . 
Holland, Pars O. 

•luist, A. 
Rotter, K. 
Hudt, Walter 
Rundqulst. O. 
Ryan, James 
Solberg. Bernt 
Sorensen, Anton 
Sorensen, Eduard 
Sorensen, Jens 

en, Jorgen 
Sorensen, P. A. 
Sorensen, Vigo 
Spanas, Nick 
Spanon, James 
Spona, Emil 
Standish, R. 
Steger, Karl 
Stelnfart, J. H. F. 
Stenberg, Alfred 
S ten berg, Gus 
i til, John 
Stintman. J. 
Stoker, John 
Strand, Charley 
Strand. Konrad 
Strasdln, W. 
Stromberg. O. 

^ad, Pete E. 
Sundberg, K. K. 
Svendson, J. 
Svensen, Albert 
Soensen. C. J. 
Svinding. Knud 
Swanson, B. 
Swanson, E. 
Swanson. Martin 
Swanson. O. 
Swedstrup, E. F. 



Tamisar, P. 
Tamilian. K. 
Tanum, Helge 

Thewas, E. J. 

.;. E. 
Thompson, Johan 
John 
Gus 
rii. ii. n, Victor 
rjlman, John 

Van Dohlan, George Vesgaard, Jens 
Van Frank, W. O. V'illetnayer, Walter 



Thorsen, Rolf 
Tliorsen. Theodore 
Tierney. Michael 
Tierney, Pat 
Tollinger. A. 

Matt -593 
Tonzel, R. 
Travnor. John 
Triedrich, H. 
Tuppitz, C. 



Verney, Paul 
VVacner, Wll 



Vogel. Gus 
Wlhtol, J. 



Waldman, Edward Williams, J. C. 



Walker, Erlck 
Wallen, John 
Walter, John 
Wa nag, J. 

. E. 

er, Charlie 

Ear 
r, Chas. 1. 
Wheatcroft, L. E. 
White. J. D. 
White. Peter 
Whiteside, Fred 
Zabel. Carl 
Zanhert, Karl 
Zechel, Walter 

i. B. \v. 
Ernst 



Williams, John 
Willman, C. 
Willman, Frank 
Wilson. J. W. 
Wilson. W. 
Winton. J. A. 
Witt. Otto 
Wold, Olaf -1285 
Wollesen, A. Chr. 
Wremmer. George 
Wrigg, Frank 

Zimmerman, Fritz 
Zunk. Bruno 
Zurenberg, Fritz 
Z wartz, AI. C. 
Zweyberg, John 



PACKAGES. 



Apply to Secreta 
of the Pacific. 

Anderson, A. 
Herling. J. B. 
Billington, Martin 
John 
ii. Otto 
Furth, Richard 
Hansen, Karl 
Hansen. Marlus 
Hansen. O. 
Hendrik8en. Hag 
bart 

. Albert 

n, A. P. 

Johansen. Emil 

Aluf 

i . Benj. 

Nor, Nils 



ry of Sailors' Union 

Olsen. Arne 
Olsen, Carl -1101 
Pennlngrud, Ludwik 
Persson. Oscar 
Petersen, Aage 
Raasch, O. 
Raaum. Henry 
Rarly. Frans 
Rathke. Relnhold 
Relursen. A. P. 
Roberts, John 
Sorensen, Pete 
Strasdln, A. W. 
Wakely, R. E. 
Winje. Ililmar 
Wurthman. W. P. 



Phones: Office, Franklin 77W 

Res.. Park 6950 
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 5:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICKEL 
DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 

(Member of the Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco.) 

The following Branches for Receipt and 

Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mis- 
sion and 21st streets. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. W. 
Corner Clement street and 7th avenue. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. 
Corner Haight and Belvedere streets. 

JUNE 30, 1915: 

Assets $60,321,343.04 

Deposits 67,362,899.35 

Capital actually paid up In 

cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve & Contingent Funds 1,958,443.69 

Employees' Pension Fund 199,164.12 

Number of Depositors 66,965 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week, with all modern 
conveniences. Free Hot and Cold Shower 
Bath on every floor. Elevator Service. 
AXED LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front Street and Broadway, 
Opposite Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. Office 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



Phone Garfield 833 E. Benvenutl, Mgr. 

HOTEL FAIRFIELD 

250 Large Sunny Rooms Furnished Up- 
to-date. With all Latest Conveniences 
and Elevator Service. Rates: 25, 30 and 
50 cts per Day. $1.25 per Week and Up. 
Free Baths — Large Reading Room 
1325 STOCKTON STREET 
Near Broadway San Francisco, Cal. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Fair Prices. Reliable Goods. 

50 East Street, 

San Francisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelopet 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN a NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Cigars and Tobacco 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



JORTALLBROS.EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 

206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

CLASSY CLOTHIER 

HATTER AND FURNISHER 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

UNIFORMS 



Gold Braid and Gold Wreaths 
of All Descriptions 



Fred Marjama, a native of Russia, 
age 36, has not been heard from since 
1908, at Buffalo, N. Y. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify his brother, J. Marjama, 51 
South St., New York, N. Y. 9-1-15 



Phone Douglas 1082 

139 EAST STREET - - - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 
Between Merchant and Washington 



C^ Hk. M ^~\ t^~ W"^ T^ ^"> See that this label (in light 

^^Ivll 3 1^. i~2 < l ,, ^^^ blue ) appears on the box in 
OiYlV/IVL-<l\ VJ whkh you are seryed 



Issued by AuiDoMtyof tne Cigar MdKers' International Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

yUliS <Eedifi# IMU»C^mcoi^dlnlhl»VaiOTb<mnn«ty«riBt-QjS$ 
l Kuarjl OF IH[ <XM vtun 'IKTUWATIOSUL man tt Aaaicj. u orui\c*o« devoted tnthead 

.inctBmlorflieMORAl.MAlDlWifvJIimaClTWiWarAMOFTHtCRAn Tktrttora m n~ - 




Uw» Cwn to all vnoken Uiroujhout IM wortd 
1 m Umiwti upon Uti Ithtl ail be punutwd «OT?«9 1> t*» 



Q TV (£Ufcut4. Pttsutent. 

r Off Mo) 




J. MILLER 

124 EAST STREET Garfield 7690 

Union Store 

HATS, CAPS, 

FURNISHING GOODS, 

ETC. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN. 
San Francisco. 
Blom, J. Petterson, Carl 

Ekeland, Will Hj. Thorsen, Ole 
Hakansson, Ingvar Thorstensen, H. 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUFACTURERS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 



BANK OF ITALY 

San Francisco Los Angeles 

San Jose San Mateo 

The Story of Our Growth 

As Shown by a Comparative 
Statement of Our Resources. 

December 31, 1904 $285,436.97 

December 31. 1905 $1,021,290 80 

December 31, 1906 $1,899,947.28 

December 31, 1907 $2,221,347.35 

December 31, 1908 $2,574,004.90 

December 31, 1909 $3,817,217.79 

December 31, 1910 $6,539,861.49 
December 31, 1911 $8,379,347.02 
December 31, 1912 $11,228,814.56 
December 31,1913 $15,882,911.61 

Dec. 31,1914, $18,030,401.59 
June 30,1915, ^19,080,264.20 

NUMBER OF DEPOSITORS, 53,946 



TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO ST., near Market 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

'IMuf Sed 



FRENCH AMERICAN 
BANK OF SAVINGS 

Savings and Commercial 



108 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Resources . . $7,700,000 

Member of Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco 

United States Depository for 

Postal Savings Funds 

DIRECTORS 

G. Beleney J. M. Dupas 

J. A. Bergerot John Ginty 

S. Bissinger J. S. Godeau 

Leon Bocqueraz Arthur Legallet 

O. Bozio Geo. W. McNear 

Charles Carpy X. De Plchon 



News from Abroad. 



□□□□□□□^□□□□□□□□□□□□onocn 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



Samuel Dickson, a seaman, age 
about 40 years, son of Moffett Dick- 
son, deceased, of Belfast, Ireland, or 
any person knowing his whereabouts, 
is requested to communicate at once 
with the undersigned in connection 
with a legacy. A. R. Smith, U. S. 
Shipping Commissioner, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of John Burke, No. 2, a member of 
the Marine F. O. and Watertenders' 
Association of the Great Lakes, last 
heard of in Chicago, will please com- 
municate with Mrs. Julia Noonan, 
276 Twelfth street, Jersey City, N. J. 

William Walker, a native of Island- 
magee. Antrim Co., Ireland, is in- 
quired for by his nephew. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts kindly com- 
nniiiicpte with John Walker, Geddis, 
7 Willowbank St., Brooklands, Win- 
nipeg, Manitoba, Canada. 



Large re-enforcements from Great 
Britain, France and Italy arc re- 
ported to be landing at the Darda- 
nelles. This, together with the at- 
tempts of the Germans to relieve 
Turkey, is thought to presage a 
vigorous offensive by the allies. 

For the first time in history, Chi- 
nese shipbuilders are competitors of 
the European yards. A steamship 
company of Drammen. Norway, has 
ordered three steamers in China, to 
he delivered in 1916 and 1917. The 
placing of this order in China is due 
to the unusual pressure on the home 
yards. 

Swedish Government experts in 
Stockholm have invented what is 
probably the most powerful explo- 
sive in the world. It has military 
possibilities and will be especially 
effective in shells. Large quantities 
have been ordered for the Swedish 
army. The chief ingredient is called 
kaulosit, an extract of ammonium. 

Australia, which won world renown 
by inviting designs from all coun- 
tries for its new capital city, and 
which invited the winner, Walter 
Burley Griffin, of Chicago, to per- 
sonally superintend the carrying out 
of the plan, is about to take a back- 
ward step by confining the com- 
petition for designs for the parlia- 
ment house to British architects. 

The attitude of the British Govern- 
ment with regard to the possibility 
of Bulgaria entering the war has 
been plainly stated by Sir Edward 
Grey, the British Foreign Secretary. 
Sir Edward has told the British Par- 
liament that in case Bulgaria as- 
sumes an aggressive attitude on the 
siili of the central powers the allies 
will give their support to "our friends 
in the Balkans in a manner that 
would be most welcome to them." 
By combined simultaneous on- 
slaught with overwhelming forces on 
every sector of battle front stretch- 
ing 300 miles from the North Sea 
to the Vosgcs mountains, French and 
British armies have captured several 
miles of German trenches and forti- 
fications for a depth in some in- 
stances of two and a half miles. 
They have seized various villages 
and vantage points and claim to have 
taken more than 20,000 prisoners and 
many guns. 

The opium trade in India, accord- 
ing to British reports, shows a 
marked falling off since the Chinese 
government in 1906 decreed that in 
ten years the growth and consump- 
tion of opium in China should cease. 
I lie export of opium from India to 
China ceased in 191.1 The number 
of chests sold for export at Cal- 
cutta in 1910-11 was 37.560; in 1913- 
14 it was only 9,000. In the former 
year the revenue was over $31,000,- 
000; in the latter year it had fallen 
to a little over $3. Dim. 

The British Board of Trade states 
that it has decided not to institute 
proceedings under section 10 oi 
Merchant Shipping Act, 1906, against 
the masters or ow nei 9 Is ar- 

in the l mi' 'I Kingdom 
tween October 31 and November IS 
nexl 01 het ween March 30 and April 
16, 1916, with deck cargoes of light 
mi hea ■ '. under 

Other conditions than those allowed 
by that section. I he B( >ard adds, 

"It is, however, to be undersl I 

that the responsibility of ma 

is for ensuring the safe 
and proper loading of I els in 

which such cargoes are carried re- 
mains unaffected by this concession." 



16 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the Wits. 



"Last night Jack tried to put his 
arm around me three times." 
"Some arm!" — Yale Record. 



The Pessimist— The best luck any 
man can have is never to have been 
born; but that seldom happens to 
anyone. — Boston Transcript. 



Lady (engaging nurse) — Have you 
had any experience with children? 

Applicant— Vis, mum. Shure, Oi 
used to be a child meself. — Tit-Bits. 



Hostess — Dr. Spriggins, will you 
have some of the tongue? 

The Doctor (absent mindedly) — 
Oh — er — let me look at it, please. — 
St. Louis Times. 



"Oh, mama!" exclaimed little Klna 
as she gazed at a visitor's bald head, 
"you said I mustn't say anything 
about Mr. Baldwin's hair, and he 
hasn't got any to say anything 
about!" 



Miss Vine — Do you favor women 
proposing? 

Mrs. Oaks — Certainly not. When 
a woman picks out a man she 
should make him propose. — Houston 
Chronicle. 



Wanted — A good yoke of oxen. 
Must have something that can be 
(Upended on when one wants to go. 
An automobile in exchange for good 
oxen. Apply for further information 
at this office. — Cleveland (Ark.) 
Herald. 



"Did you give your son a liberal 
education, Mr. Tite?" "Well, I don't 
know as you'd call it liberal exactly, 
but there wasn't a month passed 
while he was in college that I didn't 
send him two or three dollars." — 
Buffalo Express. 



"Mr. Blinks," said she, "do you 
think that anticipation is greater 
than realization?" 

'Well," replied Mr. Blinks, 'antic- 
ipation is broader and higher, but 
realization is longer and flatter." — 
Philadelphia Public Ledger. 



Secure and Profitable 

The wise man keeps part of his 
money in a reliable savings bank. If 
you are making money now, why not 
put aside something for a rainy day? 

Savings and Commercial Depts., 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 

733 MARKET STREET, Near Fourth 
8AN FRANCISCO 



BAGLEY'S 

Old Colony 

THE HIGHEST TYPE OF 

TOBACCO PACKED IN 

10c TINS, ALSO 16 OZ. 

GLASS JARS 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 
Battery Streets, Opposite New Custom 
House, San Francisco, Cal. 
THIS OLD AND NOTEWORTHY SCHOOL 
Is under the direct and personal supervision 
of CAPTAIN HENRY TAYLOR and equip- 
ped with all modern appliances to illustrate 
and teach any branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation in the 
past have been those having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, and Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
can seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. The Principal of this School, keeping 
this always in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law, and Is now, in addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation and its kindred subjects, a regularly admitted Member of the Bar. 
There Is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how lgi.orant the seaman may be, even In the rudiments of 
common education, Captain Henry Taylor will teach and raise him from the 
depths of ignorance to the height of the average well-informed man, and In a 
comparatively short Interval of time. 




UNION LABEL OF THE 

UNITED HATTERS OF N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 

him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN W. SCULLEY, President MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary-Treasurer 

Rooms 72-73 Bible House, New York City 




*%?TcrC^ 



STRICTLY UNION STORE 

J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET, OPPOSITE FERRY POST OFFICE 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER— UNION LABEL 
NOTICE! BOSS OF ROAD 
OVERALLS— PRICE, 70 CENTS 

Phone Douglas 1737 

Demand the Union Label 

DnDnnnannnDDnanaannnnDCDnnnnaDnnnnnnnnDcniinDnnnnnnnnc 




Christensen's Navigation School 

Established 1906 

116 DRUMM STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

(SCANDINAVIAN SAILORS HOME) 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, t 
pupils of this favorably known 
school are taught all up-to-date re- □ 
quirements for passing a successful = 
examination before the U. S. In- - 
spector. As only a limited number - 
of pupils will be accepted at one - 
time, delay and loss of time will - 
be avoided while preparing for ex- q 
amination. £ 

□ODDCDDOCa ]DaDDDa_aDp_qgDgDDDDDDDODDDDaDaaaaaDqDDDD 



REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 



> usori tylMAutninto ot the c 
llUUttO WWKIRS.^SSSv INTtRNKIlQNAL 
UNICIt. 



UNION 





^ames 5i. Sorensert 
£rt3. ana v/e«^ 



THE POPULAR PRICE JEWELRY STORE 

Sowmench 

715 MarKet Street, San Francisco 

NEAR CALL BUILDING 

Jewelers, WatchmaKers, Opticians 
SOUVENIRS 





Upholding American 
PROSPERITY 




The key to 
So make up 
by buying one 
for only 50c. 
way to teach 
the vital prln 
keep the key. 
the Bank by 
Do what you 
Banks on Sale 



Prosperity Is Saving 
your mind to prosper 

of Hale"s $1.00 Banks 
It Is the best possible 
the children thrift and 
clples of saving. We 
and you can only open 
bringing It to Hale's, 
wish with the money. 

at Transfer Desk. 




Market at Fifth 



*A^/V^/*AA^S/VS/VVS^V>A^VVVNA^A^VVVV>/VV< 



LUNDSTR0M HATS 

Are made in San Francitco and told 
in 4 Stores: 
1126-28 MARKET STREET 
2640 MISSION STREET 
605 KEARNY STREET 
26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 

HTsajviUel 

The Old Union Store 

CLOTHING ® GENTS 
FURNISHING GOODS 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, 

Boots, Shoes, Rubber Boots and 

Oil Clothing of All Kinds, 

Watches, Jewelry, Etc. 

693 THIRD STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 
Opp. S. P. Depot at Third &. Townsend 



Justice to All. Please Give Us a Trial 
and You Will Be Convinced. 



"YOUR HATTER" 
FRED AMMANN 



72 Market Street 
San Francisco 



Union Hats 



CJUfTBUSTFJl 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



s 





6fc 







FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXIX, No. 5. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1915. 



Whole No. 2351. 



THE PERILS OF PHILANTHROPY. 

Frank P. Walsh Dissects the Rockefeller Foundation. 



Mr. John 1). Rockefeller recently favored the 
people of the United States with his views con- 
cerning great philanthropic foundations, notably 
his own, and on efficiency in philanthropy. The 
article was striking because it expressed the 
views of the world's richest man, who is also 
the world's greatest philanthropist, and because 
it can be considered an adequate statement of 
the philosophy that seeks to justify our exist- 
ing economic and industrial regime, and the rela- 
tion of the great foundations thereto. 

The wisdom of permitting a man to accumu- 
late huge fortunes has often been challenged. 
From the knowledge I have gained in my work 
as chairman of the Federal Commission on In- 
dustrial Relations, 1 go further and challenge the 
wisdom of giving public sanction and approval 
to the spending of a huge fortune through such 
philanthropies as that of the Rockefeller Founda- 
tion My object here is to state, as clearly and 
briefly as possible, why the huge philanthropic 
trusts, known as foundations, appear to be a 
menace to the welfare of society. 

The Arbitrary Power of Wealth. 

The possession of an enormous fortune means 
arbitrary power over the lives and destinies of 
other men.. Nothing is clearer than that the 
world's striving for democracy is now expressing 
itself in the economic field, even more than in 
the political field, and we are fast coming to 
realize that the forms of political democracy 
avail nothing .when the lives of the many are 
controlled by the few who wield arbitrary eco- 
nomic power. 

So. at the outset, thinking democrats resent 
the very possibility of philanthropy on a huge 
scab-, because this philanthropy is predicated on 
the possession of enormous fortunes, and, there- 
lore, of arbitrary power over men, women and 
children. 

Even if the great charitable and philanthropic 
trusts should confine their work to the field of 
science, where temperament, point of view, and 
economic theory can not enter, many of us 
should still feel that this was work for the State, 
and that, even in the power to do good, no 
one man, or group of men, should hold the 
monopoly. 

But when a great foundation, with a rapidly 
growing fund of more than $100,000,000, enters 
the economic and political field, no such funda- 
mental objection need be admitted in order to 
convince thoughtful men of the possibilities of 
danger that lie in such an enterprise. 

Exploiting Workers to Subsidize Scientists. 

Let us take the Rockefeller Foundation, the 
most active of all, to illustrate the potential 
danger of such institutions to democracy in 
America. Mr. Rockefeller is taking money ob- 
tained from the toil of thousands of poorly nour- 
ished, socially submerged men, women and chil- 
dren, and spending these sums, through ;> board 
of personal ehioloyes, in such fashion that bis 
estate is in a fair wav not only to exercise a 
dominating influence in industry, but. before 
many years, to exact a tribute of loyalty and 
subserviency to him and his interests from 
the whole profession of scientists, social work- 
er-, and economists. -^ 

There are literally thousands of men in these 



professions receiving subsidies, either directly 
or indirectly, from the Rockefeller estate, who 
can not take any step toward effective economic, 
social and industrial reform without running di- 
rectly counter to the interests of their benefac- 
tor. No sensible man can believe for a moment 
that research workers, publicists and teachers 
can be subsidized with money obtained from 
the exploitation of the workers without being 
profoundly influenced in their points of view and 
in the eilergy and enthusiasm with which they 
might otherwise attack economic abuses. And 
there can be no question that the income of the 
Rockefeller Foundation comes, in large part, 
from the exploitation of wage earners. 

Before the complete exposure of the Colorado 
situation, but with thousands of his fellow citi- 
zens charging him with responsibility for -the 
Colorado strike and its attendant horrors, Mr. 
Rockefeller employed an expert, Mr. W. L. 
Mackenzie-King, former Minister of Labor of 
Canada and a distinguished citizen of the Do- 
minion, to advise him regarding the labor prob- 
lems in industries where Rockefeller funds are 
invested, and also to make a comprehensive, 
world-wide study of industrial relations for the 
benefit of the public. This is one of the many 
apparently innocent and useful projects of the 
Rockefeller Foundation. But when the an- 
nounced purpose is compared with the actual 
performance, there appears a glaring discrep- 
ancy. 

Mr. Rockefeller's Industrial Advisor. 

Air. King undertook to act as Mr. Rockefel- 
ler's advisor on industrial relations as long ago 
as last August. His first act, after joining the 
Rockefeller staff, was to write a letter to Mr. 
Rockefeller, suggesting, in effect, that the arbi- 
trary, undemocratic policy of the Rockefeller 
Coal Company in Colorado need not be greatly 
modified under pressure from labor, because un- 
employment and distress resulting from the 
European war would weaken the power of labor 
and force labor to take about what the employer 
cared to give it. It is the author of this letter 
to whom the world is asked to look for a way 
out from the problems which have arrayed em- 
ployer and employe in hostile front. Tt is Mr. 
King whom we are asked to take as our guide in 
working our way to a consummation of that 
full measure of human liberty and economic 
democracy on which the heart of the world is 
set. 

Mr. King was in New York last winter during 
the hearing of the Industrial Relations Commis- 
sion when employe^ of the American Agricul- 
tural Chemical Company at Roosevelt, Xew Jer- 
sey, a suburb of New York, were on strike be- 
cause they could not support their families in 
comfort and decency on a wage of $1.60 per 
day. Twenty-one of the company's former em- 
ployes were shot down by deputized Runmen foi 
peacefully protesting against conditions thai 

meant privation, suffering, disease and even death 
for themselves and their families. Although I be 
Rockefeller Foundation, then busily engaged in 

an effort to justify itself before this Commis- 
sion, held one-half million of the bonds of this 

company, apparently it made no attempt to in 
vestigate the situation at Roosevelt, Its exi 



tive officer, Jerome D. Greene, when questioned 
on the stand, was not prepared to discuss the 
fairness of a wage of $1.60, and agents of this 
Commission who followed the situation closely 
could find no evidence that Mr. King, or ail) 
other representative of the Foundation, had vis- 
ited Roosevelt or made the slightest effort to 
wipe out this particularly outrageous soi ial 
morass into which its roots reached. 

The Foundation's Peculiar Investments. 

Not only was the Foundation itself a holder 
of securities in the company which expected 
Americans to bring up families on $1.60 a day. 
but one of the directors of the Rockefeller phil- 
anthropies, Mr. A. Barton Hepburn, was both a 
director and a member of the executive commit- 
tee of the company. And Mr. Hepburn tes ti- 
lled that his sole information regarding condi- 
tions in the company's plants was obtained 
through telephone conversations with one of tin- 
company's officials, and through a chance meet- 
ing with this official at a college alumni dinner 
at Delmonico's restaurant. 

Mr. Mackenzie-King, in his testimony at the 
Washington hearing recently, declared his in- 
vestigation, insofar as it included the Rocke- 
feller industries in Colorado, to be a secret one, 
and challenged the authority of the Federal <.<o- 
eminent to compel him to declare how much 
money was being expended or the character of 
the information which he was obtaining; closing 
this portion of his evidence with the declaration 
that it was not at all necessary that the Ameri- 
can people be enlightened as to the facts in 
Colorado, but that the conscience of Mr. John 1). 
Rockefeller, Jr., in his opinion, was more pow- 
erful than any other force that could be brought 
to bear in Colorado at the time be was .^ivinL; 
his testimony. 

In the light of the record in Colorado and at 
Roosevelt alone, such philanthropy as that of 
the Rockefeller Foundation can justly be char- 
acterized as an attempt to present to the world, 
as handsome and admirable, as economic and in- 
dustrial regime that draws its substance from 
the sweat and blood and tears of exploited and 
dispossessed humanity. 

Poisonous Philanthropies. 

Just the list of directors in the various Rocke- 
feller philanthropies shows the enormous power 
that may be exercised by men financially inter- 
ested in perpetrating unjust industrial conditions 
In the list is the president enieiilu- oi OUI ' 

est university, shown by the inquiry of this Com 
mission to have been personally interested in the 
publicity bulletins issued by the operators of 
Colorado to influence the public mind against 
men who are risking their lives to lift Rocke- 
feller employes up from economic subserviency, 

and to vindicate the supremacy of the T . r 

that State. This gentleman apparent!} concurred 
in branding the denial of the righl to bargain 
collectively in Colorado and the use .if gunmen 
and venal militiamen which followed, as "The 
Struggle for Industrial Freedom in Colorado." 

Included also in the list of men holding p] 

on In, .nils controlled by Rockefeller millions ap 
pears the name of the president of out ureal 
southern university, the university thai, before 

all others, has molded opinion in tin- southern 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



. the commissionei of liealtli ol 
est northern State; the l"nite<l States Commis- 
sioner of 'Education; the Surgeon-General of the 
United States Army; a Cabinet officer; a high 
officer of the international Y. M. C. V; an 
American ambassador; the president i 
great university, and an influential magazine edi 
tor. I do not mean to imply that many of these 
are not high-minded and disinterested men. I 
believe they are. I believe that many of them 
share the fear of the influence of such a huge 
philanthropic inM when it turns to the 
nomic field, and that mure than one of them 
may have accepted places on the board because 
they felt they might prevent dangerous tenden- 
cies. But we have seen how the scholar of the 
greatest repute of them all apparently drew no 
line, in lending hi ation, between the 

Rockefeller philanthropies and the Rockefeller 
explointed industries. No argument is needed to 
convince a sensible American of the subtli 
pervasive and irresistible power that is wielded 
autocratically by men who control the disburse- 
ment of huge sum of money. It is a power that 
goes straight to our instincts, to our points of 
view, to the raw materials of which our opinions 
and judgments are made. 

But how much, as a matter of fact, can we 
rely i in t he pri on the Rockefeller 

of these nun"-' It was admitted before tin 
mission on Industrial Relations in New 
that practically all of the important decisions 
and the routine work of the charities, and. above 
all, the ill nt of moneys, are adminis- 

tered by a finance committee composed of Mr. 
Rockefeller, Jr.. and of the personal employes 
of himself and his father. These salaried men 
reflect the points of view of their employers and 
carry out the Rockefeller will. They not only 
administer the Rockefeller philanthropies, but 
they sit in council with the Rockefeller agents 

who denied industrial justice to the Colorado 

miners, ami on the witness stand i enta- 

tives of the Foundation, they speak bitterly of 
the Colorado unions in the -ante breath the 
clare that they are conducting a scientific, un- 
biased investigation of the labor problem. They 
admitted that, even had Mr. King SO far : 
len his loyalty to the Rockefeller intei 

urge recognition of the union, tiny would have 
differed with him and resisted such a policy, Ac- 
cording to the testimony of Mr. Jerome 1) 

Greene on the stand in New York, Mr. King i- 

an adviser whose advice may be freely re 

and there would be no friendly reception For 
tnendations which conflicted with tin' pol- 
icy of Mr. Rockefeller -not Mr. R r, tin 
philanthropist, but Mr. Rockefeller, the industrial 
overli u<I. 

Where the Money Comes From. 
It should be remembered that the Rockefeller 
Foundation, in protecting it.- own hundred mil- 
lions of securities, will give similar protection 

to the vastly greater fortune -nil held by the 
family in purely private owner-hip. The list 
of the securities held by the Foundation contains 
the name- of most of the corporations in which 
the family fortune is invested. In a day when 
society see- it as a burning wrong thai one 
man can levy tribute mi the right of million- of 
other men to live and to work, Mr. Rockefeller 
could find no better insurance for hi- hurl 
of million- than to invest one of them in sub- 
sidizing ail the agencies that make for social 
change and progress, 

The wealth of the great foundations is wealth 
created by the many. Even wire those directly 
concerned in its making accorded a decent wage 
and a voice in determining their conditions of 
employment, the surplus should still be avail- 
able for the work of scientists and scholars, in 
such form that these devoted men could pursue 
their studies for the benefit of mankind without 
wearing the uniform of Rockefeller and the 
others. Already then' are thousands of eager 
young scholars and scientists who know that 
some day, for the sake of their work, they may 
be drawn into the retinue of the foundations. It 
will become increasingly bad form for a man 
cial betterment work to speak ill 
of Mr. Rockefeller, Mr. Carnegie, and tin 

men who ha \ e in industry, and 

th.- universal insimci ci selt-justihc ition will in- 
evitably lead them to seek excuses and justifi- 
cations when the cry of exploitation or of tainted 
money is raised. 

Most dangerous of all, to ns the at- 

tempt by the Rockefellers, especially, to b, 
molders of public thought on the subject of in- 
dustrial relations. Every precaution that can 
be taken to give the seeming of impartiality to 
this inauiry can only make it the more danger- 
ous. Perhaps the most fortunate thing in con- 
nection with the Rockefeller industrial inquiry is 
that the quality of Mr. King's mind has already 
been shown, as well as the fact that the public 
control of this inquiry rests in the hands of the 
same men who sustain the Rockefeller policy in 
t 'oh iradi ■ 

lint, to mv mind, a still greater menace to in- 
dustrial democracy Rppears upon the horizon. 
Mr. John I >. Rockefeller. Jr., declared, in a pub- 
lic statement, that in the industrial department 

of his foundation he was securing the coooera- 

t'on of many labor leaders in hi- elf. at to brine; 

about "permanent peace" in Colorado. Will not 

the same glamor of great power and limitless 
resources, which has attracted diplom 
men and educators, make it- anneal to these 
men: When Mr. Rockefeller te Wash- 

ington, he was asked to name the labor leaders 
with whom he was cooperating in Coloradi 



admitted hi.- inabilil so. Nevertheh 

labor ! I'onhl thu- be induced to co 

ate. I can not sec how the inquiry could help 
having a tremendous effect in taking tin 
off the fearlessness and disinterested^ 
bor's leadership. I can not imagine any 
catastrophe than for the subtle influence of the 
million- ol these masters of industry to pel 
even the labor movement itself. With labor co- 
operating in aggressive and whole-hearted fash- 
ion with the great movement toward industrial 
democt could view, without serious alarm, 

the chloroforming of our economist- and 
workers. Bui it the influence of these millions 
n to circulate through tin 1 organism of 
labor itself, tin- great forward movement of our 
time might be seriously retarted, if not de- 
stroyed. I beluve. on account of the thorough 
which this proposed Rockefeller indus- 
trial inquiry ha I. together with the note 

mi President Samuel i , 
: against the whole Rockefeller investiga- 
tion into industry, that organized labor will con- 
tinue to remain sternly aloof and to view this 
new activity with steadfast distrust. — Frank F. 
Walsh in the "Independent." 



CALIFORNIA PRODUCES COAL. 



Although California <>i1 has to a large 

extent displaced tin- use of coal as a fuel 
in the Pacific Coast States, two California 
mines reported an output of coal in 191 k 

In order not to reveal the individual out- 
put of these mines their production is 
grouped with that fit" the one producing 
mine in each of the States of Idaho and 
Nevada, and the total combined production 
of the three States in 1914 is given at 13,- 
074 tons, valued at $39,821, according to 
the United States Geological Survey. 

Coal mining and the coal trade generally 
in California lay little claim to importance 
among the industries of the State, particu- 
larly since the beginning of the present 
century, when the production of petroleum 
began to exert so powerful an influent 
the fuel consumption of the Pacific ( 
From 1910 to 1912, inclusive, the coal pro- 
duction of the State was only a little more 
than 10,000 tons in each year; in 1913 
work was resumed on the Stone Canyon 
properties in Monterey County, and the 
production increased to 24,839 short tons. 
valued at $84,073. The output of I'M 1. 

however, showed an appreciable deer 
The only other production in 1914 was 

from the Tone mines, in Amador Countv. 



INSURANCE AGAINST AIR CRAFT. 



Attacks by aeroplanes upon German 

cities near the battle fronts, especially oi! 

the wot, have created a demand for in- 
surance against injuries from bombs thrown 
from them. The Stuttgart-Berliner In- 
surance Co. has in consequence established 
a department of what may properly he 
called aerial insurance, the company issu- 
ing policies covering damage to all prop- 
erty, real or movable, caused by explosive 
bodies or other objects thrown or falling" 
from Hying' machines or caused by airships 
or aeroplanes themselves in making a vol- 
untary or involuntary landing', or by parts 
thereof falling; from them. The policies 
make no provisions for injury to or loss id 
life. Details of the insurance or the rate 
of premiums have as yet not been pub- 
lished. 



Seattle is the only city in the United States 
boasting a tin smelter. This industry depends 
on the Alaskan mines for its raw material, 
but hopes to develop connections enabling it 
to draw ttpon Bolivian and Chinese sources. 
The Strait- Settlements are the present world 
baders in tin production with 70.000 tons 
annually. Bolivia yields 20.000 tons and all 
other sources 30,000 tons. 



WHAT WILL STAY THE PLAGUE? 

People ask what new arrangements 

diplomacy or revivals of Christianity— what 
alliance-, ententes, leagues of peace. Hague 
tribunals, regulations of armaments, weeks 
of prayer, or tons of Christmas puddings 
sent into the enemies' camps — will finally 
scotch this pestilence of war. And tin 
no answer, because the answer is too close 
at hand for us to see it. 

Nothing but the general abandonment of 
.stem of living on the labor of others 
will avail. There is no other way. 'Phis. 
whether as between individuals or as be- 
tween nations, is— and has been since the 
beginning- of the world — the root-cause of 
war. Early and primitive wars were for 
this — to raid crops and cattle, to can 

3 on whose toil the conquerors could 
subsist; and the latest wars are the same. 
To acquire rubber concessions, gold mines, 
diamond mines, where colored labor may 
be exploited to its bitterest extreme; to 
secure colonies and outlying lands, where 
.giant capitalist enterprises (with either 
white or labor) may make huge 

dividends mn of the raising of minerals 
and other industrial products; to crush 
any other power which -lands in the way 
of these greedy and inhuman ambitions — 
such are the objects of war.- to-day. And 
we do not see the- cause of the sore because 
it is so near to us, because it is in our 
blood. The whole private life of the com- 
mercial and capitalist who -land as 
the representatives of the nations to-day) 
is founded on the same principle. As in- 
dividuals, our one object is to find 
worker or group of workers whose labor 
value we can appropriate. Look at the 
endless columns of stock and share quota- 
tions in the- daily papers, and consider the 
armies of those- who scan thi over 
their breakfast- tables with the one view 
of finding somewhere an industrial concern 
whose slave-driven toilers will vivid the 
shareholder 5, 0, 7, 8. 10. 12 per cent, on his 
capital. Undisguised and shameless para- 
sitism is the order, or disorder, of our days. 
The rapacity of beasts of prey is in out- 
social life but thinly veiled by a network 
of philanthropic institutions for the sup- 
posed benefit of tin- v e-ry victims whom we 
have robbed. 

Is it any wonder that this principle ol 
internecine warfare and rapacity which 
titles in our midst, this vulgar greed which 
load- people's bodies with jewels and furs, 
and their tables with costly food, regard- 
less of those- from whom these comforts 
are snatched, should eventuate ultimately 
in rapacity and violence on the vast 
of the drama of nations, and in red letters 
of war and conllict written across the conti- 
nents? It is no good, with a pious snuffle-, 
i.. say we are- out to put down warfare 
and militarism, and all the time to en- 
courage in our own lives, and in our Em- 
pire Leagues and other institutions, the 
most sordid and selfish commercialism — 
which itself is in essence a warfare, only 
a warfare of a far meaner anil more cow- 
ardly kind than that which is signalized b\ 
the shock of troops or the rage of rifles 
and cannon. 

Xo. then- is no other way; ami only by 
the general abandonment of our present 
commercial and capitalist system will the 
plague of war be stayed. -Edward Car- 
penter, in "Christian Commonwealth." 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Machinists Made Gains. 

The following is a list of places where 
machinists report gains: 

New Departure Roller Bearing Company, 
of Bristol, Conn., reduced hours from 60 
to 50, after a strike of about 24 hours. 
About 1,200 benefited, of whom 800 are 
machinists. 

At Baton Rouge, La., the Standard Oil 
Company reduced hours from 9 to 8, bene- 
fiting 2,330 employes, of whom 280 were 
organized and worked at the following 
trades: Boilermakers, 200; pipefitters, 50; 
machinists, 30. The machinists* wages 
were increased from $3.50 for 9 hours to 
S4 and $4.25 for 8 hours within 60 days. 

At Meriden, Conn., the New England 
Westinghouse Company reduced hours 
from 10 to 8; 500 benefited. 

At Perth Amboy, N. J., demands were 
made for 8 hours in all machine shops, 21 
in number; 13 immediately conceded de- 
mands; one shop refused to concede, in 
the remaining shops negotiations are under 
way or the return of executive officials 
awaited. The new rates established in 
these shops are as follows : 

Two shops pay 44 cents per hour; 9 
shops pay 41 cents per hour; 2 shops pay 
$7y> cents per hour; 122 machinists bene- 
fited. 

At Springfield, .Mass., seven firms em- 
ploying 5,650 persons of whom 3,100 are 
machinists, granted 8 hours. In most cases 
the hours were reduced from 10. 

At Sheldon, Conn., after a strike of one 
da) at the K. N. Bassett shop, the hours 
were reduced from 10 to 9, and Saturday 
half-holiday and time and one-half for 
overtime and double time for Sundays, was 
agreed to. Wages were increased over pre- 
vailing rate, 14 3-10 cents per hour. 

During the month of August about 8,000 
new members were added to the Interna- 
tional Association of Machinists. 

At Wilmington, Del., two firms employ- 
ing 30 machinists have granted 8 hours. 
All other shops in that city are on strike. 

In New York City and vicinity the 8- 
hour day has been secured from 14 firms, 
employing 3,632 machinists. 



Very Palpable Deception. 
Newspapers connected with the. Asso- 
ciated I 'ress on September 8 carried a story 
asserting that the Railroad Brotherhoods 
were in active sympathy with that part of 
tlie report of the Industrial Relations Com- 
mission signed by Commissioners Com- 
mons, Weinstock, Ballard, Aishton and 
Harriman in which those commissioners 
recommended the appointment of a perma- 
nent industrial commission intended to sup- 
plant the present .Mediation and Concilia- 
tion Bureau in the United States Depart- 
ment of Labor, as well as the .Mediation 
Board of which .Martin A. Knapp is chair- 
man. The article stated that a bill would 
be introduced into the next Congress, early 
in the session, embodying this idea and 
that the officers and members of the Rail- 
road Brotherhoods would give it their ac- 
tive support. Mr. John !■'. McXamee, Edi- 
tor of the Locomotive Firemen and En- 
ginemen's Magazine, says in reply to a 
request for a verification of this recom- 



mendation : "I know of no action that 
has been taken by anyone representing our 
brotherhood or the other railroad organ- 
izations regarding recommendations con- 
tained in the report of Commissioners Com- 
mons, Ballard, Weinstock, Aishton and 
Harriman advocating the perpetuation of a 
permanent Industrial Relations Commis- 
sion or something of that kind. Should I 
learn anything of such a step being taken 
by the railroad organizations I will ad- 
vise you." 

The story was evidently an insidious 
effort on the part of persons who would, 
if they could, devitalize the splendid serv- 
ices being rendered in behalf of industrial 
peace by the Mediation and Conciliation 
Bureau in the Department of Labor, as 
well as the service which has been ren- 
dered in behalf of peaceful negotiations in 
railroad disputes by the Mediation Board 
which was established early in the last 
Congress to take the place of the old 
Krdman Arbitration Act. It is pleasing 
to note that the officers and members of 
the railroad organizations are not a party 
to the proposed personal interest scheme 
of professional sociologists and so-called 
"friends of Labor." 



Reading the Handwriting. 

The Hudson County, N. J., grand jury, 
which is expected to investigate the cases 
of the guards who are being held in con- 
nection with the killing of three citizens 
during the recent strikes at the Bayonne 
plants of the Standard Oil and Tidewater 
Oil Companies, have been sworn in by Su- 
preme Court Justice Swayze. 

The Justice reviewed the State riot 
laws, explaining that twelve armed per- 
sons, or thirty unarmed persons engaging 
in disorder, constituted a riot; but private 
persons had no right to suppress riots and, 
consequently, no right to maintain armed 
forces for that purpose. 

He added that if private parties had 
such rights anarchy would result; that no 
person had the right to take life solely for 
the protection of property, and if life was 
taken in defense of property only it con- 
stituted murder. If persons illegally armed 
themselves in defense of property, the Jus- 
tice said, and death resulted, all were 
equally guilty of murder, for all who par- 
ticipated in an illegal act were equally 
guilty. 



Telegraph Rates are Cut. 

Six months ago the rate for special press 
wires was $10 per mile per year for night 
service. The Western Union cut this rati' 
on August 7 to $5. This was met by the 
Postal with further cut to $2.50 per mile 
a year for leased press wires. Some idea 
of the expense to which a large daily paper 
is subjected as a result of the higher rate 
is shown from the fact that one Chicago 
paper paid approximately $10,000 per year 
for its service; the last cut reduces that 
amount to $2,500. 

President Mackay of the Postal Company 
is quoted as saying: "Our wires are idle 
at nighl and so we can afford to transmit 
news freely and cheaply. We have decided 

(Continued on Page 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



Internationa] Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
he found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston BIdg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, Lon- 
don, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers. 4 Spek eland Bldgs., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engel- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Cermany. 
FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts Maritimes de France, 33 rue Grange aux- 
Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 
NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrbodcr-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomcns-och Eldareforbundet, Stock- 
In dm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade 15, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
K oben ha vn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forcning, Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 
Algemeene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
lenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 
ITALY. 
Federazione Nazionale dei Lavoratori del 
Mare, Genova, Piazza S, Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 
Verband der Handels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
heiter und Arbeiterinncn Oesterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 
SPAIN. 
Socicdad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Repostcros, (alia Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 
Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calle Ingla- 
terra (>(), Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 
Federation Obrera Maritima (Sailors and Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Alios). 

BRAZIL, 
ociacao de Marinheiros e Remandores, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix IX, kin de Janeiro. 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, Largo de Sao 
1 lomingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo dos Empregados em Camara, 
Rua dos Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiiro. 

SOUTH AFRICA. 

Amalgamated Society "f South African Sea- 
i Litng Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World's Workers. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. B. CANNON 



The New South Wales Mini 
Labor is going to equip a farm 
of 2500 acres for the trainiir. 
women for agricultural pursuits. 

An eight-hour bill to regulate the 
hours of work in certain industries 
and the payment of overtime has 
passed its first reading in the New 
South Wales Assembly. 

According to the Queensland 
"Worker" military recruits in Eng- 
land were recently used to scab 
against the Birkenhead gas workers. 
Those who refused to seal, were 
punished. 

Scottish railways and the North- 
eastern have come into line with 
war bonuses to their workmen. It is 
estimated that the total cost to the 
railway companies in this connection 
will be £6,500,000 a year. 

A new labor organization, known 
as the Australian Coal and Shale Em- 
ployes' Association, has been formed, 
embracing the coal miners of New 
South Wales, Tasmania, Victoria, and 
Queensland. A ballot is proceeding 
for the election of officers. 

In view of the high prices of com- 
modities, a proposal is under con- 
sideration among Melbourne unionists 
to form a consumers' co-operative 
i iv, for the purpose of buying 
the necessities of life, and thereby 
cheapening the cost to members. The 
matter has been taken up by the 
Victorian branch of the Australian 
Plumbers and Gasfitters' Union. 

Announcement was made at Van- 
couver, P.. C, that the Attorney- 
General of British Columbia had laid 
indictments for manslaughter against 
Thomas Graham and J. H. Tonkin, 
two mining men, prominent in Can- 
ada. They are charged with car 
ncss in connection with the disaster 
that caused the loss of nineteen lives 
in the Reserve mine near Nanaimo 
on Eebruary 15 last. 

A demand that the Porto Rico 
ernment put its peasants on the 
land is made by A. F. of 1.. Or- 
ganizer Iglesias, in the official news- 
paper of the Federation of Labor. 
The trade-unionist says absentee propC 
erty owner- and foreign corporations 
have grown rich through agriculture 
and the guaranties offered by mod- 
ern conditions. Industrial depi 
and speculation are at their hi 
and rents, interest rates and living 
COStS have arisen proportionately, 
says Iglesias. 

Testifying as to the efficiency and 
saving of day labor versus the con- 
tract system, Mr. Bell (the Aus- 
tralian Commonwealth Engineer-in- 
Chief) says: "1 have been occupied 
continously for thirty-five year- on 
the construction and management of 
railways. For the last fifteen years 
I have had control of hundred 
miles of lines built by day labor 
I may, therefore, presume to have 
acquired some knowledge on tin sub- 
ject, and From what T know of the 
conduct of the work and its cost, 
and from what I s;nv during my 
recent visit to the West, 1 can assure 
you that the men are working hon- 
estly and conscientiously; that they 
are working equally as well, if not 
better, than they would for a pri- 
vate employer; that the supervising 
staff is probably as hard-working 
and efficient a staff as has ever been 
got together in Australia on railway 
construction work: and that there is 
no doubt that the final result will 
compare most Favorably with any 
similar work done under 



CANNON ® BLAIZE 



A. E. BLAIZE 



San Pedro Letter List. 



Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 
515 FRONT-516 BEACON STS. .... SAN PEDRO 

"WHEN IT COMES TO GOOD CLOTHES" 

Tailored to FIT YOU, in a UNION SHOP 

It will be to your Interest to call on 

S. G. SWANSON 

641 SOUTH BEACON STREET, next door to Postofflce 
Established 1904, at the Los Angeles "Waterfront" SAN PEDRO, CALIFORNIA 



San Pedro News Co. 

Sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

STATIONERY 

Los Angeles Examiner and All San 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



Mills, Elbert ® Nash 

SIXTH AND BEACON STREETS 
FIFTH AND BEACON STREETS 

— Dealers In — 

EDGEWORTH TOBACCO AND 

UNION LABEL CIGARS 



GIVE US A TRIAL 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

The members of the crew of the 
barkentine "Mary Winkelman" who 
made the voyage in her to Mollendo, 
Peru, and arrived at San Francisco 
on her return trip on April 5, 1914, 
are wanted by the Charles Nelson 
Co., at San Francisco, Cal. — 6-24-14 

John Erik Nordberg, a native of 
Sweden, age about 26, supposed to 
be sailing on the Pacific Coast, is 
inquired for by his brother Harold, 
care of Sailors' Union of the Pa- 
cific, San Francisco. 

Oscar Olsen, age 37, a native of 
Hallerna, near Golhenborg, Sweden, 
who was sailing on the Great Lakes 
about three years ago, is inquired 
for by John V. Olsen, Sun Com- 
pany, Marcus Hook, Pa. 5-26-15 

Adolph Godfred Eriksen, born in 
Moss, Norway, is inquired for by 
his brother, Herman Eriksen. Any 
one knowing his whereabouts please 
notify W. Nielsen, 206 Moravian St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 5-26-15 



M. BROWN and SONS 

have moved to 

109 SIXTH STREET 

Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Edgar Duncan Stewart, age 22 
years, white, born in Massachusetts, 
who, on October 9, 1912, was 
shipped as seaman on the American 
steamship "Toledo," at Marcus Hook. 
Pa., for a voyage to Sabine, Texas, 
but who did not join the vessel the 
next day, and has not since been 
heard from. The undersigned will 
highly appreciate your kind co-oper- 
ation: Augustine R. Smith, United 
States Shipping Commissioner, or 
Shipping Commissioner, Appraisers 
Building, San Francisco. 5-13-14 

Nils Edmund Johansen, a native of 
Tonsherg, Norway, age about 50, 
last heard of at Melbourne, Austra- 
lia, is inquired for by his brother. 
Address, Martin Johansen, 839 Cen- 
tennial avenue, Alameda, Cal. 

Eugene Martin, age 25, 6 teet tall, 
gray eyes, is inquired for by his 
mother. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify Mrs. Rose T. 
Martin, 4231 15 N. E., Seattle. 
Wash. 1-27-1915 

Chas. Maywell, a sailor, last heard 
of in New York City in 1892, is en- 
quired for by his son; anyone know- 
ing his whereabouts please notify 
William J. Maywell, 426 West 59th 
street. New York City, N. Y. — 12-23-14 



A SAILOR'S BANK. 

With Branches Throughout the World 

In the Philippines, Japan, China, Straits Settlements, India, 
London, Mexico and Panama, the 

INTERNATIONAL BANKING CORPORATION 

is particularly well equipped to give service to 

SEA-FARING MEN 

IN THE 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 
of its San Francisco Branch 

it gives "Personal Service" and court eous treatment to all its 

customers. Four per cent, per annum is paid on Savings 

Deposits, computed semi-annually. 

In 1910 it purchased and took over the business of the 

SWEDISH AMERICAN BANK 

and for the accommodation of its Scandinavian customers, 
the bank carries on hand at all times an ample supply of 
Swedish, Norwegian and Danish 5Kr. and lOKr. bank notes. 

Sailors' Accounts are Especially Welcomed 

Head Office— 60 Wall Street, New York 

Resources over $40,000,000 

MILLS BUILDING :: BUSH and MONTGOMERY STREETS 

Uptown Branch, Geary and Fillmore Street! 

Open Saturday Evenings, 6 to 8 

E. W. WILSON, Manager 



i. Emanuel 
Anderson, Edw. 
-1739 

■lohn -13C8 
on, Martin 
■1894 
Anderson, Sven. 
Letter.) 
Anderson, Oscar 
A nderson, l 

Enkan 
Apelqulst, Otto 
Baxter. Arthur 

i . Borge 
Buanik, L. 
Brein, Hans 
P.ensen, 
Bergman, Leo 
Benrowitz, Fells 

Pete 
Dahlgren. l'ete 
William 
. William 
Ericsson, Otto 
Eklund, Sven 
Fisher, Wm. 
Hansen, Osknr 
Hansen, ('harly 
Hansen, M. 

. Hilmar 
r, William 
llannus, Alex. 

II. -1555 
nsson, Victor 
<n, T. 
Jacobs. August 
Johansson, Geo. W. 

-1219 
Johanson, Geo. 
Johnson, Edvard A. 
Johansen, Chas. 

i. Herman 
Johansson, John A. 

-1659 
Johnson, Gus. 

■n. K. H. 
Kalnln, Ed. 



Llndeberg, i 
Lata, Konsl 

< hris. 
Lutzen, Valdemar 
Lalan, Joe 
Lindsberg, C. 
Larsen, L. K. 
Lindholm. A. 
Matson, Julian 
Mlkalsen, Andreas 

Gustat 
McGuire, J. 
Mesak, E. 
Martinson, P. A. 
li. Julius 
Niels 
John 
i ilsun, Ludvig 
Olsen, Olai 
Owen, Fred 
Ophaug, Wilhelm 
Olln, Emil 
Penningrud. Lud\ Ik 
Peterson, Hans. 

-1064 
Peterson, N. 
Peterson, Otto 

i . P. 
Philips, Charley 
Richardson, A. 
Parsons, Olaf 
RogiS, A. 
Renvall. Anshelm 
Smith, Lawrence 

Michael 
Sanders, Charles 
Stromsberg, Ivar 
Sevenson, Paul z 
Sievers. G. P. 
Tamisar, P. 
Toren, Gustaf A. 
I'hlig. Richard 
\'i nn y. M. O. 
Verdonk, Peter 
Warkkala, John 

Packages. 
Johnson, K. II. 



Honolulu, H. T. 

Anderson, John B. Nelsen, C. F. 

Burk, Harry -1284 Petersen. Carl 

Crantly, C. W. Peters. Walter 

Eugenlo, John Relther. Fritz 

,1. P.ickhard Solberg, B. P. 

Ivertsen. Sigvald B. Strand, Conrad 

Lengwenus, W. L. Thompson. Emll N. 
Moller, F. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Daniel William Thorin is inquired 
for by his mother. Anyone knowing 
liis whereabouts please notify Fru 
Thorin, Hegagata 7. Gothenborg, 
Sweden. 9-23-14 

Carl Fritjof Johansson Lind, age 
39, a native of Sonderborg, Germany, 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, is in- 
quired for by his brother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify John Lind, 1401 West 9th St., 
Cleveland, Ohio.— 3-24-15. 

Frederick Wood, a seaman, sailing 
on the Pacific Coast, is inquired for 
by his sister, Miss Lucy Wood, 10k 
Broughan street, Darlinghurst, Syd- 
ney, N. S. W., Australia. He is de- 
scribed to be tall, with dark curly 
hair and carries a scar on the nose. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
kindly notify the office of Chief of 
Police, San Francisco, Cal. — 6-24-14. 

Waldemar Stintman, alias Broth, 
a native of Russia, age 21, supposed 
to be sailing on the Pacific Coast. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify his brother, John Stint- 
man, address Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific, San Francisco. 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Magnus Magnussen, a native of 
Soderhamn, Sweden, should at once 
communicate with F. A. Smith, Box 
770. Aberdeen. Wash. 9-23-14 

Martin Nielsen, a native of Den- 
mark, member of the Sailors' Union 
on the Pacific for the last 8 years, 
has not been heard of since July. 
1912. His address then was Sailors' 
Union, Seattle, Wash. Any one 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify George Leonhard, Sailors' Union, 
59 Clay St.— 8-11-1915. 

Olai Ingebrigtsen (Brock), a na- 
tive of Norway, last heard from 13 
years ago, when leaving San Fran- 
cisco for Australia on the American 
bark "Golden Gate," is inquired for 
by li is brother. Any information re- 
garding the above named will be 
gladly received by Niels Ingebrigtsen, 
469— 49th street, Brooklyn, N. Y.; or 
Sam Andersen, 100 Steuart street, San 
Francisco, Cal. — 8-4-15. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



The schooner "Churchill" has been sold by the 
Simpson Lumber Company to the Chas. Nelson 
Company. She is a 600-ton schooner, built in 
1000. 

It is reported that the dredger "Colonel P. S. 
Michie" will be turned over to the Washington 
district for work at Grays Harbor as soon as 
her work is Finished on Coos Bay bar. 

The Port of Portland Commission was notified 
by State Labor Commissioner Hoff on October 6 
that it must discharge from its employ Chinese 

ks who were working on its dredges, under 

a law forbidding the employment of Chinese on 
any public work in Oregon. 

The Lake steamers "Burlington" and "Ben- 
nington" left Ogdensburg, N. Y., on October 5. 
en route to the Pacific Ocean to enter the coastal 
trade. They were sold by the Rutland Transit 
Company of Ogdensburg to the Alaska Steam- 
ship Company of Seattle. Wash. 

The steam-schooner "Mandalay," which got 
into heavy weather after leaving Crescent City 
and was towed into Eureka by the tug "Relief" 
on October 8 in a water-logged condition, is 
being pumped out. It is expected that she will 
right herself and be able to return to San Fran- 
cisco under her own power. 

It is not unlikely that following her return 
to this Coast the old freighter "Wellington" will 
be operated regularly in the coal trade between 
Union Bay and San Francisco in the service of 
I he Canadian Collieries. Limited, her owners. 
She is now loading coal at Newport News for 
Guaymas, and after discharging at the latter port 
is expected to return to Victoria, B. C. 

James Polhcmus, junior engineer of the Gov- 
ernment work on Coos Bay, will commence a 
survey of the U.mpqua bar and harbor next week 
and has instructions to make it thorough. The 
port of Umpqua has the towns of Gardiner and 
Reedsport, and no Government work has been 
done on the bar. The present survey is prelim- 
inary to an expected jetty and dredging work. 

The cargo of the German steamer "Setos," 
which took refuge at Honolulu at the outbreak 
of the war, may be sold there. Permission for 
I he sale has been given by the Treasury De- 
partment. The "Setos" put in at Honolulu while 
on the way from Tacoma for Melbourne with 
' cargo of lumber, valued at $75,000. Negotia- 
tions to obtain permission to sell the cargo have 
been going on for a year. 

George Watkins Evans, a United States Gov- 
ernment engineer, has returned from Alaska 
afler having subdivided the Bering River coal 
fields into units of from 320 to 2560 acres for 
the Bureau of Mines. The field work has been 
completed, and the notes will be delivered in 
Washington by November 25. During the survey 
Evans discovered the body of Newland Smith, a 
well-known pioneer, known as Kayak Smith, who 
disappeared three years ago. 

The Simnson Lumber Company is said to have 
cut more lumber during the month of August 
than ever before in the history of the concern. 
Five ship loads of lumber left the Porter mill 
al Coos Bay during that month and there is 
still a lot on hand. The mill is receiving 
enough orders to insure its running for the rest 
of this year and Manager A. K. Arklcy states 
that there is no reason apparent now why the 
plant should not continue to run 

On account of the block in the Panama Canal, 
caused by the big slide, the Luckenbach Steam- 
ship Company will transfer freight from its 
steamers in the Pacific to those in the Atlantic. 
This announcement was made by the office in 
this city during the week. Other companies are 
touting their vessels through the Straits of Ma- 
gellan until the canal situation is cleared, but 
the Luckenbach Comnanv will transship freight 
over the isthmus until its vessels can navigate 
the waterway again. 

Swayne & Hoyt and the Atlantic Transport 
Companv have entered into a contract to fur- 
nisli 200,000 feet of clear spruce used in aero- 
plane construction at $98.75 a thousand feet de- 
livered. The lumber is worth $40 a thousand 
on the dock here. The- Arrow line will receive 
$3 a thousand to deliver the material at San 
Francisco, while the Atlantic Transport Com- 
pany will receive $55.75 a thousand for the trip 
from San Francisco to London on the old Pa- 
cific Mail steamer "Manchuria." 

Groping through a dense fog, the British 
steamer "Calchas," bound from Vancouver, B. C, 
to Port Townsend, Wash., grounded on a rocl 
150 yards west of Point Wilson. She struck at 
'ow tide and took water rapidly, swinging so her 
bow was nearly submerged and pointing west. 
Two bitr lighters are near, and the Coast guard 
cutter "Areata" is -landing by. The extent of 
damage i-- not known, but it is believed two 
holes were punched in her bottom. Diving and 
salving anparatus has been sent for. 

Major-General Georgi W. Cethals has with- 
drawn his resignation as Governor of the Pan- 
ama Canal zone. This was announced bj Gen 
eral Goethals when In irrived on tin steamship 
''Cristobal" from New York after a vacation in 
the United States. His action was taken, he 
--aid. because of i!i< recent slid< s in the Gaillard 
cut, which have closed traffic through the canal. 



General Goethals said he would remain in Pan- 
ama indefinitely or until the condition of the 
canal would permit his departure. 

According to an announcement by the Pan- 
ama-Pacific line, the White system of oil-fuel 
instead of coal is to be employed aboard the 
steamers "Finland" and "Kroonland" on the 
seventeen-day run from New York to Los An- 
geles and San Francisco, via the Panama Canal. 
The "Finland" and "Kroonland," 22,000 tons dis- 
placement, arc the largest vessels ever equipped 
with oil-burners, and the necessary changes 
which will be made during November and De- 
cember will not interfere with the scheduled 
sailings. 

General raising of charter rates from Pacific 
Coast ports to the United Kingdom, the first 
move of shipowners to protect themselves 
against loss by the Panama slide began during 
the past week. Offers of steamers at 100 shil- 
lings were received by Portland exporters, but 
no takers were found. The British steamer 
"Margram" was chartered by M. H. Houser at 
97 shillings 6 pence. She is claimed to be the 
last unchartered steamer in the Pacific Ocean. 
It was said in some quarters that this raise will 
not be the only one and that 125 shillings may 
be reached. 

It was rumored in shipping and customs cir- 
cles that the famous steamer "Sacramento," now 
interned in Valparaiso by the Chilean Govern- 
ment, may shortly be released and her registry 
transferred from the American to the British 
flag. The "Sacramento," formerly the German 
steamer "Alexandria." was supposed to have 
been bought by an American company. After 
much delay the "Sacramento" cleared from here 
for South America with a cargo of general mer- 
chandise about a year ago. As she approached 
the Chilean coast the cargo was transferred to 
the German warship squadron, it is said. 

One of the longest passages on record between 
San Francisco and the United Kingdom has just 
been completed by the French bark "General de 
Ncgrier." The vessel left San Francisco March 
23 and arrived at Harwich on September 29, 
according to a report received by the marine 
department of the San Francisco Chamber of 
Commerce. One hundred and eighty-eight days 
was occupied in the trip, and hope had nearly 
been given up for the safety of the vessel, which 
it was thought some German submarine had 
sunk. The "Negrier" was loaded with 66.402 
centals of California barley, valued at $99,600. 

A complaint was filed with the California 
Railroad Commission by C. H. Soov and H. W. 
Glensor, representing the Pacific Coast Steam- 
ship Company, the Pacific Navigation Company, 
the San Francisco-Portland Steamship Company, 
the North Pacific Steamship Company and the 
Independent Steamship Company, against some 
fifty defendants representing ownership of about 
Kit) steam schooners, alleging the latter are 
"free lancing" and undercutting regular estab- 
lished lines. The complaint states that the in- 
dependent steamships named as defendants have 
not complied with the Public Utility Act in filing 
tariffs and schedules with the Commission. 

A Seattle correspondent says that the recent 
loss of the "Edith" again emphasizes the risk 
in the transport of Alaska copper concentrates 
which are shipped in the form of mud. Being 
extremely heavy, this cargo fills up but a small 
portion of the lower hold and in heavy weather 
it shifts easily. In such cases it is impossible 
to trim cargo or right the ship. A similar mis- 
hap was that of the steamship "Dirigo," which 
foundered in heavy weather in like circumstances 
in November of last year. The "Edith" loaded 
her valuable cargo at Latouche for Seattle. 
Later she encountered a terrific storm, was 
thrown on her beam ends and began taking 
water rapidly. Tt was decided to abandon her, 
as every effort to right the steamer had proved 
futile. The sea was so rough that it was im- 
possible to board the lifeboat alongside. Con- 
sequently, officers and crew were compelled to 
bai> from the sloping decks of the derelict am! 
swim for the lifeboat. All were saved. The 
steamer "Mariposa" picked up the survivors the 
same day. A hawser was placed aboard the 
"Edith," but when the towline carried away it 
was deemed inexpedient to make further efforts 
and the "Edith" was finally abandoned to her 
fate on August 30. She was insured on a value 
of $110,000 and her cargo was worth $275,000. 
The "Edith" was built at Sunderland in 1X82 for 
the Glen Line as the "Glenochil." Sin- was pur- 
chased on this Coast in 1900 and rechristened. 
for several years she operated between San 
Francisco and Nanaimo, B. ('., in the coal trade. 
Later she was enrolled as an American vessel 
and was taken over b\ the North western Steam- 
ship Company, since merged with the Alaska 
Steamship Company, her late owners. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
'liner in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine lav. in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants' Exchange Bldg., Thirel Floor, fall 
fornia St., near Montgomery. Telephone Kearny 
394. (Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' 

FEDERATION. 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary, 

570 West Lake St., Chicago, III. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 
Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass, l'/ 2 A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
BALTIMORE, Md.. 802-804 South Broadway St 
NEW YORK CITY, 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St 
NORFOLK, Va.. 41 Loyalls Lane. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 South Commerce St 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 12 South St. Telephone 2107 

Broad. Night Call 2108 Spring. 
New York Branch, 400 West St. Telephone 5153 
Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 258 Commercial St 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 117 Decatur St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 806 South Broadway. 
MOBILE, Ala.. 104 S. Commerce St. 
PHILADELPHIA. Pa., 206 Moravian St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 
Headquarters (temporary): 
BOSTON, Mass, iy 2 A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PHILADELPHIA. Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
NEW YORK, 51 South St. and 280 West St. 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway 
NORFOLK, Va., 41 Loyalls Lane. 
NEW ORLEANS. La., 206 Julia St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 190 West St. Phone 4126 Worth. 

LAKES DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, III., 570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 15 Twelfth St. 
SDFERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isahella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 445 La Salle Ave. 
DETROIT, Mich., 27 Jefferson Ave. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis.. 1814 Fourth St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isahella St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 1C8 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
HEADQUARTERS: 
406 N. Clark St., Chicago, III. 
Telephone Main 365. 
BRANCHES: 
Buffalo, N. Y. Teileelo, O. 

Cleveland, O. North Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Milwaukee, Wis. Superior, Wis. 

Ashtabula, O. Brie, Pa. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAX FRANCISCO, Cal., 59 Clay St. 

Branches: 
VANCOUVER, B. C. 213 Hasting St., E, corner or 
Hasting and Main. P. O. Box 13';:.. Tel. Seymour S70:t. 
TACOMA, Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 
SEATTLE, Wash., 84 Seneca St.. P. O. Box 65. 

IBER1 iEEN, Wash., P. O Box c 
PORTLAND, Ore., 44 Union Ave., Ninth. 

i REK v. Cal . 227 First St., I' Box 84 
SAN PE1 >R< '. Cal , P. n Box 07. 
HONOLULU, it. 'i'.. Cor. Queen and Nuuanu Sta., 
i ( ' Box 314. 

(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 
BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



PAUL SCHARRENBERG Editor 

I. M. HOLT Manager 



TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

One year, by mail - $2.00 I Six months - - - $1.00 
Advertising Rates on Application. 



Changes in advertisements must be in by Saturday 
noon of each week. 



To insure a prompt reply, correspondents should ad- 
all communications of a business nature to the 
Business Manager. 



Entered at the San Francisco Postoffice as second- 
• lass matter. 



Headquarters of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific, 

59 i 'lay Street, San Francisco. 



NOTICE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
published in the JOURNAL I they are of gen- 

eral interest, brief, legible, written on one side only 
of the paper, and accompanied by the writer's name 
and address. The JOURNAL i ponslble for 

the expressions of correspondents, nor for the return 
"f manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1915. 



"MADE IX ,APAN." 



The "Stars and Stripes" have ever been 
regarded as a valuable asset by the principal 
employers of coolie labor on the Pacific I 

"Hauling down the American flag" has 
been adopted as the stuck phrase of the gen- 
try who have driven the American seamen 
from the oceans and substituted < >rientals. 
I hit no incident will better illustrate our local 
coolie-lovers' devotion to the American flag 
than tlic little story about thousands upon 
thousands tiny silk American flags said to be 
held at the San Francisco custom house be- 
cause the receivers of the goods can not very 

well use them as intended. 

The story is to the effeel thai the noble 
coolie-patriots conceived of an ingenious 

scheme to discredit the new Seamen's law. 
The idea was to distribute thousands of these 
tiny flags, attached to a wee little masthead 
with the inscription "This flag needs your 
help. Only five of them remain on the Pa- 
cific." 

It was a grand ami beautiful scheme. It 
was intended to he a silent but effective ap- 
peal to all true patriots. But like its origi- 
nators the appeal was coolie-tainted. The 
beautiful little flags were "Made in Japan." 
And when the bogus patriots discovered that 
there is a law which requires all articles made 
abroad, and intended for individual distribu- 
tion, to he stamped as having been manufac- 
tured in the country of their origin there was 
consternation in the "American" coolie lovers' 
camp. 

At any rate, it is reported that the flags 
.are still in the custom house for the schemers 
have arrived ut the conclusion that the "Made 
in lapan" inscription would not carry a par- 
ticularly logical appeal to the heart and 
head of the average American. 

( )h. patriotism, what crimes are committed 
in thy name ! 

American ships manned by Chinese crews 

exclusively 1 

American Hags "Made in Japan!" 
Strike up the hand and play America! 
Banzai ! 



THE CASE <»F MR. HUMPHREY. 



Congressman William E. Humphrey, of 

Seattle. Wash., has ever been a faithful 
servant of the "House of Have." Through- 
out his public career Mr. Humphrey has 
favored every reactionary step and opposed 
every progressive measure. 

Inst at present Mr. Humphrey is an as- 
pirant for the United States Senatorship 
Washington State, and in accordance 
with "time-honored" custom he is endeavor- 
ing to disseminate information upon his 
dyed-in-the-wool love for the common 

pei iple. 

Says Mr. Humphrey, in a recent com- 
munication to the Central Labor Council 
of Seattle: 

I do nol believe thai vessels under the Amer- 
ican flag should be manned by foreign o 
when there arc many competent American offi- 
cers "in i a' employment and ready and willing 
n> take these places. . . 

None hut trained and skilled sailor, 
upon lifeboats in time when the 

lives of those on board are placed in their care 
ami keeping. The 1 .a Follette law does not re- 
quire that the men who handle lifeboats shall be 
drilled and trained and fully qualified for this 
work. That is one of the reasons why I opposed 
il . . . 

All the provisions of this law that help the 
sailor or tend to greater security to life and 
a I am in favor of and I In ipe U I 
see their retention upon the statute hooks. The 
other sections should, in my judgment, he re- 
I. . . . 
I believe in my own country first — always. I 
believe in taking care of American labor first. 1 
believe that all work in this country that Amer- 
ican labor can do should he done by Ami 
paid American wages. ! do noi b< 
that anj foreigner should be given any job that 
an American i> ready and willing to perform. . . 

What beautiful phrases Mr. Humphrey is 

able to ConCOCl when he is after the elusive 

workingman's vote. But how meanint 

and empty those charming a! es be- 

come when we contrast the man's perform- 
ances with the man's promises. 

By word and <]wA this man Humphrey 
has persistently and consistently given the 
lie to every one of the typewritten sen- 
tences submitted to the Seattle Central 
Labor Council. 

The representatives of Labor who know 
Humphrey will look upon his eleventh-hour 
protestations of friendship as an ill-timed 
j( >ke. 

Unreasonable and uncompromising, yes; 
at times even offensively insulting, has 
Humphrey's attitude toward Labor. Mis 
sicklv whine about "American labor first" 
becomes nauseating when we examine his 
public record as a lifelong champion ol 
< Iriental coolie labor. 

Le1 us hope that Mr. Humphrey's 
stituents will take his honeyed words with 
several large grains of salt. The organized 
workers of Washington State owe it as 
a duty to themselves and an obligation to 
their fellow workers el in our coun- 

try to retire that servant of plutocrac) to 
private life. 1 1 is candidacy for the United 
States Senate is preposterous. It can nut 
and must not be taken as serious. 



Till-: I 



\KIIT" VS. UNEMPLOYMENT. 



ry injunction judge and every reac- 
tionary statesman is perfectly capable oi >l<-' - 
livering a first-class after-dinner speech upon 
the sacred "rights" of property. Bui m 
even such a distinguished scholar as ex- 
President Tafl has been able to tell h's starv- 
ing, oni of-work fellow citizens just what to 
do when in that unfortunate condition. 

Unemployment and uncertaint) of employ 
ment has become the bane of existence l"i 
lite average workingman. So serious has the 



subject grown in recent years, that it is at- 
tracting the attention of economists, philan- 
thropists and statesmen. Man) conventions 
and conferences have been held t. 
t!u- subject and variou tods have been 

• ted for the relief of a condition which 
rils the health and standards of living of 
the working people. 

Periods of industrial depression occur in 
the United States with painful regularity. 
Such periods are accompanied by lack of em- 
ployment and all the attendant evils which 
that condition brings. And the causes are 
purely artificial, for periods of industrial Stag- 
nation come when Nature is most bountiful. 

all the natural conditions in our coun- 
try are favorable for prosperity. 

Following each change in national admin- 
istration tl imes a period of doubt and 
uncertainty which makes its influence felt 
throughout the length and breadth of the 
country. What is the reason? Nature rec- 
ognizes no change in our national adminis- 
tration. Our natural resources are not di- 
minished by any such change. Crops are 

bountiful each year, yet unemployment 
is on the increase. We feel the effeel but 
we fail to look do 'Ugh for the cause 

in an effort to have it removed. 

( Opinions ma) differ on the desirability of 
having a high protective tariff or absolute 
trade. Between the two extremes prob- 
ably lies the solution of the problem, for reve- 
nue must be supplied to meet the expen- 
government. But there can be no difference 
of opinion on the point that the tariff, whether 
high or low, shoidd be fixed after mature and 
deliberate consideration by men in a position 
to know all the facts and conditions. 

can be done as long as it is left in the 
hands of politicians, who cannot possibly be 
iion of all the facts and whose opin- 
ions, perhaps unconsciously, are swayed by 
personal consideration. 

It is essential, therefore, that the whole 
subject of tariff-making be taken out of the 
realm of politics and placed in the realm of 
economics. That is what is proposed by the 
Tariff Commission League, recently organ- 
ii absolutely non-partisan basis and 
incorporated under the laws of Illinois. Many 
of the leading men and women of the coun- 
try have joined in the movement. Among 
these arc John Mitchell, former president of 
the United Aline Workers, and Warren S. 
Stone. Grand Chief, Brotherhood of Locomo- 
! ngineers. The purpose of the Tariff 
Commission League trouse a sentiment 

in the country sufficiently strong to compel 
Congress at its next session to create a per- 
manent non-partisan Tariff Commission with 
powers broad enough to enable it to fully 
inquire into tariff schedules and make such 
recommendations to Congress, based upon 
facts, a-, the particular situation may seem 
arrant. 
A tentative draft of a bill has been pre- 
pared by the Tariff Commission League. The 
hill provides for the creation of a permanent 
commission of seven persons. No political 
party can have a majority on the commission. 

I abor, agriculture, manufactures, trade and 

commerce and education are to have direct 
m on the commission. 

far as known, this is the first time that 
provision has been or direct labor rep- 

ition on a commission of this kind, al- 
io gh at every national election political 
rs have worked overtime to convince 
Hie •■oils .if toil that the main For a 

high protective tariff was to protect Amer- 
ican labor from cheap foreign competition. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Yet every reading American wage-earner was 
fully aware of the fact that the most highly- 
protected American industries invariably gave 
preference to the most ignorant foreigners 
and paid the very lowest rates of wages. 

For these reasons the proposed plan should 
be encouraged in every way, and especially 
by the working classes, who have always 
been the dupes of tariff legislation and are 
in every instance the chief sufferers when in- 
dustrial depressions are brought on through 
tariff tinkering by the politicians. 



THE I. W. W. HIGHBROW. 



When a certain "society lady" called at 
the Journal office the other day we were 
forcibly reminded that f. W. W.'ism flour- 
ishes more among theoretical highbrows and 
half-baked college professors than among the 
men and women who toil. 

And, needless to say, we find again that 
Kipling was not far from the mark when he 
asserted that the "female of the species is 
more deadly than the male." 

The I. W. W. female highbrow moves in 
"society" just as if she were a normal snob; 
but from time to time she visits the Weary 
Willies and easily works herself into their 
good graces by frequent (substantial and 
welcome) cash donations to the cause. In 
due time the I. W. W. female highbrow is 
then entrusted with such slight tasks as the 
running of errands for the unkempt. The 
dear highbrow lady is then in her glory — her 
weak, partly unbalanced mind is in the acme 
of bliss. In return some contributor to the 
Idle Wonder Workers' official organ will then 
refer to the condescending Lady Bountiful 
as "an active woman worker," and so on, 
and so forth. 

[. W. W.'ism is surely a curious disease. 
It never attacks folks who can think straight; 
but, like a virulent cancer, it lays hold upon 
the mentally weak. The poor, half-starved 
migratory worker sometimes falls for it — at 
least until the aching void in his stomach has 
been relieved, and he is again enabled to rea- 
son without passion. It rarely attacks ordi- 
nary people, but docs occasionally get in its 
deadly work with the "sassity" lady who 
never toiled, and could not think along log- 
ical lines if her life depended upon it. 

And these are the wonderful people who 
"want to abolish the wage system" and "take 
possession of the earth." 



The particular attention of all seamen is 
directed to the Departmental Rulings (pub- 
lished elsewhere in this issue) upon the 
"Able Seaman" clause and the "Language 
Test" contained in the La Follette Sea- 
men's law. It should be understood that 
applicants for able seamen's certificates will 
not be required to pass an examination if 
they can show affidavits or other evidence 
of three years' service on deck at sea or 
on the Great Lakes. And it should be 
noted further that no one need apply for 
such examination unless the applicant has 
had at least one year's experience on deck 
at sea or on the Great Lakes. All who 
have bad more than three years' service 
should prepare for the filing of an affidavit 
setting forth approximately when, where 
and on what vessels such three years of 
service was obtained. Additional informa- 
tion for three-year men will be published 
in these columns from week to week. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases! 



DEPARTMENTAL REGULATIONS. 



"Able Seaman" Clause and "Language Test" as 

Officially Interpreted by Department of 

Commerce. 



The following important official inter- 
pretations of the "Able Seaman" clause and 
the "Language Test" have just been re- 
ceived : 

Able Seamen. 
Department of Commerce, 
Office of the Secretary, 

Washington, Sept. 15, 1915. 
Department Circular No. 264. 
To Collectors of Customs, Supervising and Local 
Inspectors, Steamhoat-lnspection Service, and 
Others Concerned: 
By virtue of the authority conferred by Sec- 
tion 13 of the Act approved March 4, 1915, which 
provides "That upon examination, under rules 
prescribed by the Department of Commerce as 
to eyesight, hearing, physical condition, and 
knowledge of the duties of seamanship, a per- 
son found competent may be rated as aide sea- 
man after having served on deck twelve months 
at sea, or on the Great Lakes," the following 
regulations are prescribed for determining the 
knowledge of the duties of seamanship of such 
persons who make application for examination 
for a certificate of service as able seaman: 

1. Any person who has had twelve months' 
service on deck at sea or on the Great Lakes 
on any vessel of 100 tons gross and upward (ex- 
cept those navigating rivers exclusively and the 
smaller inland lakes, and except fishing or wha- 
ling vessels or yachts), including decked fishing 
vessels, naval vessels, and coast-guard vessels, 
may make application to any board of local in- 
spectors for a certificate of service as able sea- 
man, and upon proof being made to said board 
by affidavit as to service, and examination as to 
physical condition and knowledge of the duties 
of seamanship, showing the nationality and age 
of the applicant and the vessel or vessels on 
which he has had service, the board of local in- 
spectors shall issue to said applicant a certificate 
of service which shall he retained by him and be 
accepted as prima facie evidence of his rating 
as able seaman. 

2. No person shall be examined who does not 
produce satisfactory affidavit or affidavits that 
he has served at sea or on the Great Lakes as 
prescribed in paragraph 1. 

3. Each applicant shall pass the prescribed 
physical examination before a medical officer of 
the Public Health Service before being permit- 
ted to take the examination to determine his 
knowledge of the duties of seamanship. 

4. The professional examination to determine 
the applicant's knowledge of the duties of sea- 
manship shall be oral, and shall he conducted 
in the form of questions and answers and by 
practical tests. The applicant shall he examined 
in each of the prescribed subjects and given a 
mark- in each based on a scale of 100. 

5. No person shall be recommended for or 
shall receive the certificate of service as able 
seaman who fails to attain a general average of 
merit of less than 70 per cent. 

6. The professional examination may he con- 
ducted by an officer of the United States Navy, 
the Coast Guard, Lighthouse Service, Coast and 
Geodetic Survey, Navigation -Service, or any 
other marine officer designed by the Secretary 
of Commerce. When any such officer conducts 
the examination the board of local inspectors 
shall issue to the applicant a certificate of serv- 
ice as able seaman upon receiving notice in 
writing from such an officer that the applicant 
has passed the prescribed examination as to 
knowledge of the duties of seamanship. 

7. The professional examination will be con- 
ducted as concisely as possible, with the view of 
determining the applicant's qualifications, and 
will embrace the following subjects: 

(a) Boxing the compass. — The applicant will 
be required to box the compass by points or de- 
grees, according to the experience he has had in 
the use of either method. 

(b) Lights and fog signals. — A knowledge will 
be required of the running and anchor lights for 
steam and sailing vessels on the sea, inland wa- 
ters, or Great Lakes, and a like knowledge of 
fog signals, according to the waters on which 
the applicant has served. 

(c) Signals for starting, stopping, slowing 
down, and backing the engines of steam vessels. 
— This examination will he restricted to the sig- 
nals in use on the sea, or Great Lakes, accord- 
ing to the waters on which the applicant has 
served. In view of the widespread use of en- 
gine telegraphs, knowledge of engine bell sig- 
nals, while deemed advantageous, will not be 
required if in other respects the candidate quali- 
fied. 

(d) Passing signals for steam vessels. — To be 
confined to vessels meeting or passing under 
ordinary condit ions. 

(e) Knotting, bending, splicing, and hitching. 
The applicant will he required to make a few 

of the principal knots, bends, splices, and hitches 
In common use by sailormen. 

(f) Ability to Dull an oar. The applicant" 
knowledge of pulling an oar will bi determined 
by actual trial in a boat. 

(g) Clearing away, lowering, and getting a 

(Continued on Page 10.) 




SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cat, Oct. 11, 1915. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
]>. m., Joe Faltus presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping dull; a number of men around the Hall. 
Full Shipwreck Benefit was awarded to ten mem- 
bers of the crew of the steam-schooner "Gray- 
wood," which sank off Cape Flattery, Oct. 2, 
1915. The delegates to the California State 
federation of Labor Convention submitted a 
report which will be printed in full in this 
week's issue. 

JOHN H. TENNISON, Secretary pro tern. 

Maritime Building, 59 Clay St. Phone Kearny 
2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Oct. 4. 1915. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects poor; 
few men ashore. 

REGINALD TOWNSEND, Agent. 

Room 11, De Cosmos Block, 1424 Government 

St. 

Vancouver, B. C, Oct. 4, 1915. 
Shipping fair. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
213 Hastings St., E. corner of Hastings and 
Main. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 4, 1915. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 4, 1915. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 4, 1915. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

J. PEARSON, Agent. 
P. O.. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Oct. 4, 1915. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
44 Union Ave. North. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 4, 1915. 
No meeting: no quorum. Shipping and prns- 
pei ts poor. 

JOHN ANDERSON, Agent. 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553. 



San Pedro Agency. Oct. 4, 1915. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128'/$ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Sept. 27, 1915. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

JACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS* ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cat, Oct. 7, 1915. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order 
at 7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secretary 
reported shipping fair. Nominations of officers 
for the ensuing term were proceeded with. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

42 Market St. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Sept. 30, 1915". 
No meeting. Shipping slow. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203. P. O. Box 214. 
Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Sept. 30, 1915. 

No meeting. Shipping poor; plenty of men 

ashore; prospects uncertain. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 

P. (). Pox 54. 



DIED. 

Joseph Damison, No. 75, a native of Finland, 
age 51, was drowned on Columbia River, Ore., 
Oct. 3, 1915. 

\lfred Morris, No. 22.^.?, a native of Boston, 
Mass., died at San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 7. 1915. 

A more or les-, persistent rumor is going the 

rounds thai the Pacific Coast Steamship C 

pauv has sold its big steamer "Congress," for 
service on the Atlantic Coast. The "Congress" 
is a vessel of nearly 5, tun) tons net register, with 
line passenger accommodations for about 525 
people, in addition to a large freight can' 
capacity The "Congress" was built at Camden, 
N. J., and arrived here on her maiden vo< 
from the Atlantic via the Straits of Magellan, 
October 6, 1913, Her principal dimentioni are: 
I engtli ovei all, II' feel 6 inches ; bel n een pi i 

tl i c u la t 125 f i id t h 55 fei d i ' i 

lielti , 38 feel 6 inches; depth t" In 

deel 10 inch ge, 7,985 

gross. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



THE HERRING FISHERIES. 



The possible effect of the present war on 
the herring fishing is a subject of consider- 
able interest in view of the fact that the 
industry is a very important one to the 
various countries whose shores arc washed 
by the North Sea, and provides most 
European nations with an article of food, 
the abundance or scarcity of which is of 
no small importance to the countries con- 
cerned. 

Discussing the matter recently the Star 
I London i wrote: Tt may sound somewhat 
incongruous, but it is a matter of history 
that even such insignificant things as her- 
rings have played an important part in the 
shaping of the world's destiny. At least 
in two great wars they were indirectly 
factors of no inconsiderable moment. In 
the Hundred Years war there occurred the 
famous Battle of the Herrings, and again, 
in the Dutch wars of the early seventeenth 
century, it was the proceeds of the her- 
ring industry alone which enabled the 
Hollanders to carry on their fighting with 
such success that they ranked as an im- 
portant power. 

Nearly 2,000,000 barrels are exported 
every season to Germany and Russia, 
where they form a staple food of the 
peasantry. Where the fish comes from 
is not known. Some of the old fishermen 
hold to a theory that they hibernate during 
the summer with their heads in the mud, 
while others maintain that they have their 
home in the crystal seas of the Polar 
regions, where they thrive so exceedingly 
that each season the native waters become 
overcrowded, and great shoals are forced 
to move southward in search of new feed- 
ing grounds. Herrings are a gregarious 
fish, moving in large shoals composed 
of a number of smaller ones, which have 
been known to be eight to ten miles long, 
two to four miles wide, and of unknown 
depth. 

The manner of catching the fish has 
not changed with the centuries, although 
the small sailing craft has been almost 
displaced by the more wieldy but less 
beautiful steam-drifter, and drift nets are 
still used. 

The drift net is buoyed at the top with 
corks and weighted at the bottom. For- 
merly they were made of hemp, but now 
cotton is used, being lighter and handier, 
so that instead of 13 yards the nets are 
J" yards in length, and in place of some 
60 or 80, the boats can carry 100 or ISO 
of them. With all her nets "shot" a 
drifter might ride all night with anything 
from one to two miles of netting setting 
like a wall in the sea. The most im- 
portanl market is for bloaters, for which 
the best fish are used, and as it is im- 
portant that the fish should be brought 
quickly to market, the steamer naturally 
has the advantage over the sailing craft. 
Bloaters are obtained by smoking the 
herrings in fires of oak billets, and it is 
this oak wood that is supposed to impart 
to them their subtle flavor. Kippers are 
split, soaked in brine and then smoked. 
The greater portion of the catch, how 
the article concludes, is dried and pickled 
and packed in vasl quantities in barrels 
of brine for Russian, Herman and Medi- 
tei i anean markets, 

\s far as Great Britain is concerned, in 
normal circumstances it is the Scotch 
fisherfolk who principally engage in the 



industry. The men put out to sea in their 
smacks as soon as the fish begin to appear 
along the Scottish coast, and follow them 
down to the Yarmouth Roads, where, in 
the autumn, they congregate in extra- 
ordinary abundance. The movements of 
the boats at sea are followed on land by 
a veritable host of Scotch fisher-girls, who 
travel down to the various ports and are 
ready to deal with the catches as they 
arc brought in. Those who are familiar 
with Yarmouth and Lowestoft as popular 
summer resorts would scarcely recognize 
the well-known east coast towns under 
their autumn aspect. On the days when 
the boats do not put out to sea both towns 
are transformed into Scottish colonies; 
crowds of fishermen in blue jerseys throng 
the streets, and groups of fisher-girls in 
queer-looking waterproof skirts saunter 
bareheaded through the town, knitting as 
they go, and chattering in a dialect which 
few of the usual inhabitants understand. 

Apart from the fishing industry itself, 
the advent of these Scottish visitors is of 
no -mall importance to the prosperity of 
these seaside towns, for Yarmouth and 
Lowestoft are the last ports at which the 
fisherfolk touch before returning home, and 
the purchasing of presents for those at 
home results in the creation of a second 
ason" for these towns. 

Whenever there is a possibility of a 
"catch," the fishermen disappear from the 
streets, and a flock of brown sails out at 
sea betrays their whereabouts. Meanwhile 
the girls are busy mending nets, or pre- 
paring for the reception of the haul at the 
various curing houses along the beach, and. 
as soon as the fish are landed, they set 
to work in their thousands along the level 
"denes," or sandy, sedge-grown hillocks, 
which are a feature of the East Anglian 
coast. The fish are brought up from the 
wharves in curiously-shaped carts, specially 
built to enable them to pass through the 
narrow Yarmouth "rows," likened by Dick- 
ens to the bars of a gridiron, the driver 
standing upright on his vehicle and bal- 
ancing himself, as it was once remarked, 
with that perfect poise which in former 
days was peculiar to the Grecian charioteer. 

The girls have to be in readiness, of 
course, at whatever time of the day or 
night the boats may happen to return with 
their load, and the sight of them working 
by torchlight is so unique ami picturesque 
as not to be easily forgotten. 

In 1913 Yarmouth and Lowestoft ex- 
ported about oOO.OOO barrels of salted her- 
rings to Hamburg, but at present that 
opening is closed and the transport of her- 
rings to Holland, another good customer, 
has also been prohibited. The stoppage of 
tin British trade must also react upon Ger- 
many : but a German paper, in discussing 
the subject, stated that the latter country 
hoped to obtain much of her ordinary sup- 
ply from Norwegian fishermen, who go 
further afield for their catches, and do 
much of the herring fishing off the coast of 
Newfoundland. 



ILLITERACY GREATLY REDUCED. 



Hitherto the postage stamps of the 
Chinese postoffices were ordered from 
foreign countries. In view of the war in 
Europe it has become difficult for the 
Government to import new supplies. The 
Ministry of finance has decided that 
postage Stamps be manufactured and 
printed by the Government Engraving 
Bureau at Peking. 



The United States Bureau of Education 
announces that whereas in 1900 there were 
42 out of every 1000 children between the 
ages of 10 and 14 years who were illiterate 
— that is, unable to read and write — in 1910 
the number had been reduced to 22, and in 
1 (, 14 to 15. These statistics, when put with 
those of the censuses of 1880, 1890 and 
1900, indicating a steady decline of illiter- 
ates 10 years of age and over by percent- 
ages of 17. 13.3, 10.7 and 7.7 per 1000, show 
clearly the net outcome of the vast machin- 
ery of instruction which the nation main- 
tains by a lavish scale of public and pri- 
vate expenditure. The huge sums paid 
gladly by taxpayers are bringing in good 
investment returns. The electorate is rising 
in capacity to know for itself who are tin- 
men that would lead it. and for what they 
specifically stand, judging them by their 
public utterances, by their votes as legis- 
lators or by their acts as administrators. 

This steady reduction of the rate of illit- 
eracy has been coincident with an increas- 
ing rate of population caused by immigra- 
tion, a fact of considerable significance and 
accounting in part for the smaller number 
of illiterates in the northern States, where 
most of the newcomers have settled. 

What a well-equipped public school sys- 
tem may do for a State that in its begin- 
nings decides to invest intensively in pop- 
ular education is shown by the latest sta- 
tistics of the Bureau of Education anenl 
Oklahoma. The proportion of illiterate 
children there fell from 124 per 1000 in 
1900 to 17 in 1910. Xow it is the lowest 
of any State in the Union. White. Amer- 
ican Indian and Negro youth have all been 
corraled and given the rudiments, and that 
right quickly. But the gain has not been 
confined to virgin territory. New Hamp- 
shire, under the lead of vigilant superin- 
tendents, has reduced its child illiterates 
from four to one during the IOOO-1'UO dec- 
ade. Delaware also has a creditable record. 
But the most marked gains have been in 
the middle and far West, while the least 
responsive region is the South. 

A State which has the initiative, referen- 
dum and recall especially needs a popula- 
tion that can read and write. If the polit- 
ical action of to-morrow is to be direct and 
not indirect, if each citizen is to vote on 
laws, accepting or rejecting the same as lie 
deems them wise or unwise, then it stands 
to reason that the more the voter knows 
the better for society. No State can count 
on a progressive, steadily ascending na- 
tional existence that lacks citizens who are 
able to rule it in accord with both facts 
and ideals and who can study its history, 
its economic resources, and its laws. The 
more there are of such intelligent citizens 
the broader based any government will be. 
So it is not at all surprising that a low 
rate of illiteracy and a high rate of civic 
evolution go together. Christian Science 
Monitor. 



'I'hc increase from the Ship Registry Act 
of August IS. 1914, to June 30. 1915, was 
si rapid that tonnage under the American 
flag now employed in foreign trade is 
nearly equal to such tonnage under the 
French or Norwegian fla^s. British ton- 
nage, ol course, is more than tenfold 
greater. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases! 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



"CRIMINAL CONSPIRACY." 

(By Fred H. Moore.) 



Labor has no more dangerous thing con- 
fronting it than the law of criminal con- 
spiracy. Wherever members of organized 
labor raise their voices or attempt to act 
in anywise along lines of self-betterment, 
just that minute along comes the sheriff 
with a warrant charging criminal con- 
spiracy. Criminal conspiracy to do some- 
thing. It may be criminal conspiracy to 
violate the Sherman anti-trust law, as in 
the case of Gompers, Mitchell and Mor- 
rison, or it may be criminal conspiracy to 
sneak on the streets in alleged violation 
of an alleged city ordinance, as in the 
case of the San Diego fight, or it may be 
criminal conspiracy to prevent an employer 
from securing other workers to take the 
place of those who refuse to work under 
existing conditions, as in the case of prac- 
tically every strike of any large dimension. 

Criminal conspiracy has been, in the last 
five years, used by the authorities in con- 
nection with every labor dispute, whether 
the acts attending that dispute be petty or 
grave. For example, it was criminal con- 
spiracy in the case of Moyer, Haywood 
and Pettibone. It was criminal conspiracy 
in Lawrence in the case of Ettor, Giovan- 
nitti and Caruso. It was criminal con- 
spiracy at Indianapolis, in the case of 
Ryan, Clancy and others. 

Now, why is it that this charge of con- 
spiracy is always made? Those who 
know the law of conspiracy realize that 
the answer is so simple that he who runs 
may read. From time immemorial this 
charge of conspiracy has always been used 
by the Government to suppress all unified 
action by those opposed to the existing 
order. Originally the law was applied to 
criminal conspiracies, political in character, 
against the existing government. Later, 
it came to be applied to labor disputes. 
( )ne of the earliest known cases is that of 
the Tub-Women of London vs. the Brewers 
of London. Here the mere fact that the 
tub-women had united and formed an 
organization, was in itself, and apart from 
any overt acts that they might do, unlaw- 
ful. This conception of the law remained 
in force until well along into the nineteenth 
century, and it took a distinct act of the 
British Parliament to legalize labor unions. 

Under the charge of conspiracy the au- 
thorities, under the law, are allowed to in- 
troduce a vast range of evidence not di- 
rectly pertinent to the particular individual 
or individuals on trial, but which they 
get into the record under the theory that 
the same is applicable to the law of con- 
spiracy. Just what constitutes a conspiracy 
the law itself is uncertain about. For 
example, we have Chief Justice Shaw, at 
one time Chief Justice of the Supreme 
Court of the State of Massachusetts, say- 
ing, with reference to the definition of con- 
spiracy : "But the great difficulty is in 
framing any definition or description to be 
drawn from the decided cases which shall 
specifically identify this offense — a descrip- 
tion bmad enough to include all cases pun- 
ishable under this description." If the 
courts don't know what constitutes con- 
spiracy, then how can it be expected that 
a workingman will know? 

The law of criminal conspiracy to-day is 
uncertain, defies intelligent analysis and is 
a perpetual menace to co-operation in any 
organized effort to do anything contrary to 



the wishes of those who control organized 
government. Under the law of conspiracy 
everyone who co-operates in any organized 
movement is responsible for each and every 
act of each and every individual co-oper- 
ating along the line of that movement, 
even though the act which the individual 
does is really outside of the range of the 
purpose of the original program, provided 
that a jury sees fit to say, when influenced 
by prejudice, malice and ill will, that a 
conspiracy had been formed. Some of the 
most vicious verdicts returned by juries 
have been under the cloak of the law of 
conspiracy. 

The law of conspiracy is a hydra-headed 
monster standing in the way of organized 
progress. It makes possible manifold mis- 
carriages of justice, reduces the administra- 
tion of the law to the whim and caprice 
of judges and juries and makes it im- 
possible for the common people to maintain 
that respect for the administration of the 
law which is a fundamental requisite for 
the orderly progress of society. We should 
direct all of our efforts to the destruction 
of this legal myth which possesses dangers 
far greater than any virtues that any one 
can find in it. As long as the law of 
criminal conspiracy stands on the statute 
books of cither the State or Federal Gov- 
ernment it is impossible to secure any 
large, broad and sweeping program of 
organized labor. 

Labor must do one of two things; it 
must either develop such control of the 
machinery of government and of the courts, 
particularly as to enable it to reshape and 
remake the law of conspiracy so that the 
law as it now exists will no longer be 
applicable to labor disputes, or, independent 
of the securing of political control, labor 
must secure such industrial power as will 
enable it to call checkmate to all efforts 
of the authorities to enforce the so-called 
law of conspiracy, thus rendering ineffect-' 
ive and impossible of enforcement the law 
itself. The duty is imperative that this law 
shall be nullified in some manner, otherwise 
all the efforts looking to the coalition and 
creation of real solidarity in the ranks o'i 
labor will be rendered ineffective by the 
authorities. 



SHIPBUILDING IN JAPAN. 



Great activity is being shown at all Japa- 
nese shipyards, even the smallest keeping 
their employes at work day and night. At 
the Mitsu Bishi yard in Nagasaki four 
ships with a tonnage of 7300 each and two 
of 3700 tons each are under construction. 
At the Kobe yards of the same company 
one 1800-ton and two 5300-ton vessels 
are on the ways. In the last named city 
the Kawasaki yards are building one 1700- 
ton, and one 3000-ton, two 4000-ton, and 
three 7300-ton boats. Other important 
orders being executed at the different 
shipyards are: Osaka Iron Foundry, 
Osaka — six 7300-ton, one 5000-ton, twelve 
3200-ton, one 1100-ton; Uraga Dockyard 
Co., Uraga — four 2200-ton vessels; Fuji 
Nagata yard — one 2000-ton ship; Harima 
yards, Kobe — two 1100-ton vessels. 

This is a total of 43 ships, and there arc 
said to be many still being negotiated for 
between builders and owners. The Mitsui 
Bussan Kaisha is negotiating for the build- 
ing of two cargo boats of 5,000 tons each. 
Builders are now reluctant to accept orders 
in anticipation of a scarcity of materials. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above stated 
reasons, or because of rules of the so-called 
"Welfare Plan," by any agent or represent- 
ative of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied concerns, including the 
masters and officers of the ships. 
Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 

LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 

570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 

BRANCHES AND AGENCIES: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND, 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

NORTH TONAWANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 15 Twelfth Street 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

FORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 445 LaSalle Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS: 
406 N. Clark St., Chicago, III. 
Telephone Main 365. 
BRANCHES: 
Buffalo, N. Y. Toledo, O. 

Cleveland, O. North Tonawanda, N. V. 

Milwaukee, Wis. Superior, Wis. 

Ashtabula. O. Erie, Pa. 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

MARINE HOSPITALS: 

CHICAGO, ILL., DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 



RELIEF 



Ashland, Wis. 
Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
El - in.iba, Mich. 

Grand Haven, Mich. 
Green Bay, Mich. 
i [oughton, Mich. 
Ludington, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 
Brie, Pa. 
Menominee, Mich. 



STATIONS: 
Ogdensburg, N. V. 

Oswi'RO, N. Y. 
Port Huron, Mich. 
Manitowoc, Wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, Wis. 
Saginaw, Mich. 

i usky, 1 1 

Sault Ste. Marie. Mi. Ii. 

Sheboygan, v. 
Superior, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



to '1" SO, The whole public will get the 
benefit." No announcement has been made 
of a reduction in the rate for day wires, 
which remains at $20, eight limes the rate 
now paid the Postal for night service. 
Some indication of the reduction in night 
rates is shown by the fact that at the be- 
ginning of the year the Associated Press 
leased 28,000 miles of wire at a COS1 of 
$336,000 lor night service. If the Western 
Union follows the example of the Postal, 
the COSl of 28,000 miles of wire will be 
$84,000, or a saving of $252,000 from the 
rate paid previous to August 1. 



DEPARTMENTAL REGULATIONS. 
(Continued from page 7.) 



OLD AGE. 



The United States Public Health Service 
and the various health agencies of this coun- 
try are working to prolong the average dura- 
tion of life. In this they are obeying tin' 
desire for existence which is the strongest in- 
stinct of mankind. ( rnly a small proportion 
of the human race rounds out its tour of duty 
on this earth. Some people are horn with 
good bodies which they treat well. Barring 
accidents, they live a long time. Some people 
are horn with poor bodies which they treat 
well. Barring accidents they can live to a 
ripe old age. Some people are born with 
good bodies which they treat badly, and some 
people are horn with poor bodies which they 
treat badly. They don't last long. 

It is recorded that in Yorkshire in 1501, 
Henry Jenkins was born. He died in lf>70, 
cut off at the age of 169. He remembered 
well the battle of Flodden Field. This oc- 
curred in 1513. when he was 12 years of age. 
The Register of Chancery and other courts 
show the administration of oaths to him 140 
years prior to his death. He gave deposition 
as witness when he was 157. In his young 
manhood, when he was a little over 100, he 
was a remarkable swimmer. 

The term "old age" too frequently is an- 
other name for the falling due of the debts 
of youth. Over-eating, over-drinking, over- 
playing, over-working, these are drafts on the 
bank of Nature which sooner or later must 
be met. Sometimes the day of reckoning can 
be put off a little bit, but Dame Nature will 
not be wheedled out of her claim. 

The remarkable thing about Henry Jenkins 
is the fact that he has left behind him no 
rules of living which would enable one to 
duplicate his feat. In this he showed great 
self -repression. As a matter of fact, there is 
no royal road to old age and it is not to be 
attained by a particular dietary or regimen 
of life. Perhaps the best rule may be ex- 
pressed in one word, "Moderation." Modera- 
tion in food, moderation in drink, moderation 
in the joys and worries of life, moderation in 
work, moderation in recreation, equanimity of 
the mind, the sold and the body. These make 
for long tenure of life. 



Tonopah, Nevada, since its discovery in 
has produced silver and gold to the 
value of more than $60,000,000 from veins 
in the Tertiary volcanic rocks. Goldfield, 
Founded in 1902, was a direct outcome of the 
development at Tonopah. The deposits here 
also occur in Tertiary volcanic rocks, lint in 
form and character they are entirely different 
from tin- Tonopah veins. The total produc- 
tion from Goldfield to the cud of 1913 was 
over $65,000,000 in gold and silver. 



PACIFIC COAST MARINE. 



boat away from the ship. — The applicant's abil- 
ity will lie determined by actual trial a 
ship. 

(h) Handling boats at sea. — This examination 
will include questions relative to tl er han- 

dling of a boat in running before a heavy sea; 
in pulling into a sea: the trip of the licit; and 
Steering with an oar, tiller, or yoke. 

(i) Knowledge of nautical terms. — The appli- 
cant will be required t" definitely locate differ- 
ent parts of a ship, and to give the nan 
different masts, sails, rigging, davits, etc. 
(j) Steering.- The applicant will be r< 
iii demonstrate his knowledge of handlin 

i of a steamer by obeying orders passed to 
hint as "wheelman." 

WILLIAM C. REDFIELD, 

Secretary. 
Language Test. 
Department of Commerce, 
Office of the Secretary, 

Sept. 18, 1915! 
Department Circular No. 265. 
To Collectors of Customs and Others Concerned: 
Section 13 of the Seamen's Vet of March 4, 
1 '> 1 5, in part, provides as Follows: 

"No vessel of one hundred tons gross and up- 
ward, except those navigating rivers exclusively 
and the smaller inland hit > cept as pro- 

vided in section one of this Vet, shall he i 
mitied to depart fron ort of the United 

States nniess she has d a crew not less 

than seventy-five per centum of which, in each 

partment thereof, at derstand any 

\ en by the i iffii ers < if such vessel, . . . 

"The collector of customs may, upon his own 
motion, and shall, upon the sworn informal 
of any reputable citizen of the United Slates set- 
ting forth that this section is not being complied 
with, cause a muster of the crew of any 
to be made to determine the fact: and no clcar- 

iven to any vessel failing to 
ply with the pro if this section: . . ." 

This section will take effect as to vessels of 
the United States on November 4. 1915, and as 
to all foreign vessels on March 4, 1916. 

The Department construes the words ''able to 
understand any order given by the officers of 
such vessel" to mean the necessary orders that 
may be given to members of the crew in each 
department in the course of the performance of 
their duties. 

The Department does not construe the above 
section as requiring the use of any particular 
language on the part of ■ nd crew of any 

I Any language which is understood in 
sufficient measure by both the officers and the 
proper proportion of the crew will comply with 
the law. It must ch-arly he understood, there- 
fore, that the section can not be construed as 
requiring an English-speaking crew. For exam- 
ple, on a French vessel the French Iangu 

Spoken by the officers and if understood hy the 

proper proportion of the crew would suffice. 
The same would he true of Spanish on a Span- 
ish vessel, of German on a German 
Therefore, no specific language is required but 
only that whatever language is used it shall he 
understood as the law requires, 

'Hie Department also construes the section as 
meaning only such orders as mac normally be 
given to members of the crew in each depart- 
ment of the vessel in the course of the usual 
performance of their regular duties. Among 
duties, however, should be included life- 
emergepcy work for such mem- 
bers of the crew as may be called upon to per- 
form tins, classes of work. The Department 
would not consider il a proper construction of 
tion to require, for example, that a waiter 
should understand orders normal to the en gin e- 
force or that a stoker should be required 
t < > understand orders which n olely to the 

• if a deckhand or seaman. In the 
'if a waiter, a st,,ker, a Si 
other employe on tlie vessel who W3 
in do emergency or lifeboat work it would be a 
construct ion of thi to require 

him to understand orders fur such 
or lifeboat service. 

Department construes the section to mean 
that a demonstration in the presence of the cus- 
collector or hi- deputy by the proper pro- 
iii of the crew in executing the actual or- 
ders of an officer would he a sufficient pro 
compliance with the law. Tt will be noted that 
the orders are t,, be given "by the officers" and 
not by the customs collector or any one acting 
in his behalf. 

The I (epartment further ci mstrues I 
to mean that the muster of the crew for which 
des shall take place at such rea- 
sonable times and ns as will determine 
the facts sufficiently in advance of the time fixed 
for the sailing nf ih' vessel to permit the en- 
gaging of such new members of the crew is 
mav be necessary in time for tin vessel 
without delay. Tin nent understands the 
law to require th irding of the 
through the language test by such means at 
such times and in such a manner as shall be 
il and nol hurtful lo ,,ur marilini. 
C and that it is in no sense intended Pi he 

reate embarrassment or t,, can 

• i s e or di 
WILLI \M C RE mi i i. ix 

tare. 



gravity of the shipping situation between 

this Coast and the Atlantic, due to 

i he I 'anama < 'anal, becam ■ n in 

'i San Francisco shipping men. Some 
linion that the slides would be 
cleared within a short time and that traffic 
would he resumed by November 1. but others 
v\ ere in | -iter, manager 

for W. R. Grace & Co.. was one Of the latter 
who believe that there will he no regular i 

the first of the year. Steamship owners 
and operators are planning to route their 
sels via the Straits of Magellan, and two com- 

niade such announcements I reighters 
of tin- American-Hawaiian fleet, which are now 
held at each entrance of the canal by the bit,' 
slide, will to their destinations via the 

Straits of Magellan, according to an announce- 
ment hv Fre"d Hooper, district Freij 

re at 1 1n- Pacil of the 

'.eh the freighter "Kentuckian" from Ha- 
waii, and I he " I law aiian," "' 
and "Montanan" from San Francisco. On the 

side arc the "Arizonan," "Iowan" and 

"Virginian" hound to this port. All of these 

Is will proceed to their distillations around 

South America. Three other freighters of the 

On this Coast will load for the 
Atlantic with the idea of going through the 
canal soon aft' -t of Not 

'tan," "Honolulan" and "Texan." 
W. R. Grace & Ccfl announced also that their 

to and from the Atlantic which are 
at or near the canal will 1- h the 

. llan. 'fhe "Santa Santa 

in! "Simla i arc at the Atlantic 

terminus, and the "Santa Catalina' 
.and all of these will i traits. 

I In "( 'i ilumbia," now in n route 

t" Santos. Brazil, to load i been or- 

dered hack to Sau Francisco I gravity of 
the slide in the canal, it is I by many 

shipping men. will hold 

months, instead of one month i d it is 

likely that no vessels will pass through until 
about the first of the year, thej 



The 1." laden with 

a valuable cargo, is an abandoned derelict off 
the North Pacific coast, drifting to the whims 

of wind and sea, and a menace to Coastwise 

loose 
steamer "Hilonian," which, after taking 
olf the former vessel's crew near Umatilla Reef, 
was towing the disabled craft into PugCt Sound. 
The "Hilonian" endeavored to keep the derelict 
in sight, hut the vessel drifted away in the 
murk of i Ever since tugs, - 

bent, have been seeking in vain for the rich 
prize. In command of t I ■ i, who 

was making his first voyage as of the 

vessel, the "Graywood" left Pui rid on 

of ore and 1,450,000 feet of lumber. With Cape 

Flattery almost in sight, tl d" be- 

disabled and v. as drifting toward the jag- 

eeth of Umatilla keif whin picked up by 

'Hilonian." The "Graywood," which was 

ly the I tollar." is ,,w ned by 

i S. Beadle and under charter to the 

(>]s ( ,n & Mahony Steamship Company. 

The steamship "Mariposa" of the Alaska 
npany's fli i nt on the 

. m Pointer I • r Bella Bella, B. < '., 

mi October 8, is in a dangerous position, ac- 
cording to word received by her owners. The 
"Mariposa's" hold a ire full of 

and the vessel has a bad list to Stat 
and has a big hole in her forward bottom. The 
"Mariposa's" seventy-nine pa en route 

Seattle to Alaska points, were land 
the beach by the - small boats soon 

after the ship struck-. \ short time later thev 
w ere picked up by tl patch," 

which i the "Mariposa's" "S. O. S" call. 

The ii" is proceeding to Ketchikan. 

where tin passengers will await the arrival of 
the "Admiral Kvans," which will take them to 
their destinations. Two salvagi - have 

been di d From Victoria, B. C . in r< - 

to a hurry call from Captain O'Brien, whi 
much of the cargo could be saved if prompt 
n was taken. 



TEARS THAT WON'T COME. 



Says the News-Bee of Toledo, Ohio: 
"We just can't succeed iii turning on the 
tears and throwing a tit over the fact that 
tlie glorious old Stars and Stripes has dis- 
appeared from the Pacific merchant marine 
because of the sale of the Pacific Mail 
Steamship Company's \i an At- 

lantic concern. 

"It is true that ( >ld < 'dory has 1 een 
battled down, as to the Pacific, but it is 
also true that it was flying over Chinese 
crews exclusively. It may be tough on 
a but it isn't our mission to 
do their yelling for them." 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



DELEGATES' REPORT. 



San Francisco, Cal., October 11, 1915. 
Sailors' Union of the Pacific: 

Comrades: — Your delegates to the convention 
of the California State Federation of Labor here- 
with submit our report. 

This was the sixteenth annual gathering of the 
Federation and was held in the city of Santa 
Rosa, October 4-8, inclusive. There were in at- 
tendance about 200 delegates, representing a 
membership of about 35,000. The number of 
delegates was considerably smaller than at pre- 
ceding conventions, due no doubt to the fact 
that a great number of labor conventions have 
been held in this State during the past few 
months. 

[n addition to the annual reports of the Offi- 
cers and the General Organizers, 45 propositions 
were submitted to and acted upon by the con- 
vention. 

According to the report of the Secretary- 
Treasurer the average paid-up membership of 
the Federation for the year was 66,500. There 
lias been a falling off in the membership during 
the year of about 2,400. This does not indicate 
that the movement is retrogressing; the shrink- 
in membership is caused by the general state 
of unemployment consequent upon the prevailing 
business depression. A number of new unions 
have been organized and have become affiliated 
with the Federation during the year. The great- 
est progress has been in San Pedro, where a 
gain from 400 to 1,700 members has been made, 
flic activity in organizing in that city has shown 
splendid results in betterments in wages and 
working conditions. The condition of the labor 
movement in Los Angeles was given careful con- 
sideration by the convention, and it was deter- 
mined to seek the co-operation of the American 
federation of Labor and the International Unions 
concerned in a concerted organizing campaign 
in that city. The unions at Stockton are re- 
covering from the effects of the protracted strug- 
gle with the Merchants, Manufacturers and Em- 
ployers' Association of that city. Disregarding 
the agreement under which the lockout was set- 
tled last December, namely, that wages and 
working conditions prevailing before the lockout 
should be restored, the employers in some cases 
have reduced wages and lengthened the hours 
of labor. This action on the part of the em- 
ployers has had the effect of reopening the strug- 
gle. A serious aspect of the situation is the 
number of injunctions issued by the courts re- 
straining picketing. The Federation therefore 
determined to expend the balance of the defense 
fund raised last year in lighting the injunction 
cases. 

No other strikes of any magnitude have oc- 
curred during the past year. 

Nearly all the resolutions adopted were on 
the subjects of organization and legislation. 
Among the latter were: Resolutions demanding 
the extension of the provisions of the Chinese 
Exclusion Act to embrace in its scope all Asiat- 
ics; extending the provision of the Child Labor 
Law prohibiting the employment of children 
under 14 years so as to include newsboys and 
strict vendors; requesting Saturday half-holiday 
for Federal employes; protesting against the in- 
terpretation placed upon the Civil Service Law 
by the federal Civil Service Commissioner under 
which the Navy Yard employes are prevented 
from serving as officers of their unions or as 
officers of the Labor Council; indorsing the plan 
of pensioning superannuated Government em- 
ployes; demanding an eight-hour day for miners 
and other underground workers; providing for 
the improvement of labor conditions of Postoffice 
employes, etc. Of particular interest to the 
maritime craft is a resolution introduced by the 
maritime delegations declaring that the La Fol- 
lette Seamen's Act should not be weakened by 
amendments, or otherwise, but should be rigidly 
enforced; also resolutions presented by the Iron 
Trades delegates protesting against any change 
in the Navigation Laws designed to permit for- 
eign-built vessels to engage in the coastwise 
trade. 

The Federation, after giving due consideration 
to the published statement of Governor Johnson 
giving his reasons for his refusal to pardon Ford 
and Suhr, now serving terms of life imprison- 
ment as a result of the Wheatland riot, renewed 
its former declaration of belief in the innocence 
of these men and requested the Governor to 
reopen the hearings on application for their par- 
don "at such time as the threats of sabotage and 
incendiarism c. 

'fhe convention was addressed by Congress- 
man William Kent of the Second District of 
California, who stated that the conservation 
movement, in which he was greatly interested, 
had received the undivided support of the labor 
group in Congress, and the latter, in return, had 
been assisted by the conservationists. A paper 
was also read by a member of a delegation rep- 
resenting tin- Laborers' friendly Society of 
Japan, the germ of the future labor movement 
of that coi'iilrv 'Ibis delegation was admitted 
to the convention ;i-, fraternal delegates and re- 
mained throughout the entire session. The paper 
referred to recited the history of the efforts 
made bv tin labor people of Japan to organize, 
the lirsi attempt being a purely political move- 
ment copied after the Socialist parties in Europe, 

This party was crushed !>> the government, and 

organization along political lines prohibited. 
The present movement is purely industrial and 



is patterned upon the British and American sys- 
tem. 

The convention was cordially received and 
handsomely entertained by the citizens of Santa 
Rosa, and was instrumental in organizing a 
number of business establishments, and also in 
forming several new unions. The next conven- 
tion will be held in Eureka. Nearly all the in- 
cumbent officers were re-elected. Harry Ohlsen 
of San Pedro was elected Vice-President for 
District No. 2, succeeding Harry Pothoff of the 
Marine Cooks and Stewards' Association. Hugo 
Ernst, of the San Francisco Waiters' Union, was 
chosen as delegate to the American Federation 
of Labor convention. 

Particular attention is called to the boycott 
upon the products of Levy Strauss 6k Co., San 
Francisco, manufacturers of overalls and shirts. 
Respectfully submitted. 

ED. AXDFRSEN. 

E. ELLISON. 

I I; \NK JOHNSOX. 

HARRY OHLSEN. 

PAUL SCHARRENBERG 



A PROFESSOR ON "POLITICS." 



Uovv good citizenship is discouraged and 
destroyed by existing economic conditions 
was made clear by Dr. Arthur T. Hadley, 
president of Yale, in an address to his stu- 
dents on February 10. Dr. Hadley is re- 
ported as follows : 

The man who makes politics a profession and 
has a wife and children dependent upon him, 
is sooner or later going to be forced into the 
position where, for the sake of his wife and 
children, he will have the choice of doing what 
is not quite right and staying in office, or doing 
that which is right and getting- out of office 
and permitting his wife and children to starve, 
and a man cannot sec his wife and children 
starve. No man under present conditions in 
the United States has a right to go into politics 
unless he is of independent means. 

So, according to Dr. Hadley, politics 
must he left principally to beneficiaries of 
prevailine; conditions. Others must resign 
their right as citizens. But does not the 
doctor sec another alternative? Docs he 
not sec that the very conditions he de- 
scribes condemn the economic system that 
makes them possible? Tnstcad of keeping 
out of politics would it not be better for 
men, threatened with loss of citizenship, to 
use their political rights, while they may, 
to change the system? Dr. Hadley has 
been professor of political economy. Tt is 
to be taken for granted, therefore, until 
otherwise proven, that he has a thorough 
knowledge of the principles of that science. 
He must know then that failure to make 
our statute laws square with correct eco- 
nomic principles is the cause of conditions 
under which it is possible for a man turned 
out of office, to be forced to face the possi- 
bility of starvation. He must know that 
the remedy is to correct that error. Neg- 
lect of the remedy he has shown, produces 
conditions fatal to good citizenship. Can 
a good citizen do less then, than assist the 
forces attacking the fundamental evils un- 
derlying our unjust social conditions? 1 — 
The Public. 



Labor's Economic Platform 



CHESTS FOR LIGHT STATIONS. 



A new type "f tool chest for use at light 
stations, containing all tools that arc re- 
quired by keepers in ordinary repair work 
at stations, has been designed and equipped 
in the third United States lighthouse dis- 
trict. The cost of this chest, complete with 
tool . w ill be about $30. 

The Bureau of Lighthouses states that 
it is also proposed by the third inspector to 
n a similar chest, to be fitted with 
pipe and machine tools, for use at oil 
engine stations, and to be fttrni hi <\ to such 
stations in addition l" the carpenter 



Demand the union label upon all purcha 



following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 

public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 

10. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 
mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and . the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

IS. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

nnnnnnnnnnnDnnnnnnnnnDDnnnnnDDDnnn 

International Seamen's Union 
of America 



(Continued from Page 5.) 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 58 Commercial St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1408% Western Ave., P. O. Rox 
875. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 242 Flander St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., 613 Beacon St., P. O. Rox 574. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 42 Market St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Pier No. 1, Room 63, P. O. 
Rox 214. 

PORTLAND, Ore., Room 10, Blekle BldR., 27V4 
Second St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Rox 54. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cat, 4!l Clay St. 

Agencies: 
SEATTLE, Wash., SI Seneca St., P. O. Box 42. 
ASTORIA On . P. O. Box 138. 

DDDnnnnaaanaDDnnnnanDDDDcxiDnnnnnna 
The Coast Seamen's Journal 

i be procured by seamen at 

i 

of the 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



12 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Labor News. 



SEATTLE, WASH. 



Office Phone 
Elliott 135 



About 3500 of the 5000 employes 
of the Brown & Sharp Manufactur- 
ing Company are out on strike, the 
result of a refusal at Providence, R. 
I., on the part of the representatives 
of that concern to concede eight 
hours and an increase corresponding 
to what had been granted by other 
concerns in this section. Immediate- 
ly following the action of the men. 
Congressman O'Shaunessy wired the 
Department of Labor in Washington 
to send a mediator to Providence. 
In response to that request John A. 
Moffitt was dispatched to this city. 
The Brown & Sharp Company is 
the largest machine tool manufactur- 
ing plant in the United States. Tt 
has heretofore been especially an- 
tagonistic to labor unions and a bit- 
ter tight will no doubt result. 

Six hundred employes of the Sey- 
mour Manufacturing Company of 
Seymour. Conn., have struck for a 
55-hour week and 10 per cent, in- 
crease in wages, computed on the 
basis of the present 60-hour week, 
with time and a half for overtime. 
The company was willing to concede 
all that was asked for except com 
puting the increase on a basis of the 
60 hours, offering an increase on the 
55-hour basis. This the men refused. 
This action was the result of a strike 
• if 50 men on the night shift who 
secured a temporary agreement and 
wage increase. The men are nol or- 
ganized. Some two weeks ago the 
machinists struck, secured their de- 
mands and returned to work The 
company makes brass disks which 
are used in the construction of shells. 

The members of the Manufactur- 
ers' Association, according to infor- 
mation which has reached the ;i 
of tin- Pennsylvania State Depart- 
ment of Labor and Industry, have 
decided to break down the child, 
labor law passed at the last session 
of the Legislature. This is to be 
done by discharging from their mills 
children between fourteen and six- 
teen years who are permitted to 
work provided they attend continua- 
tion sell i • hours each week, 
''ne manufacturer, who evidently 
voiced the sentiments of his as 
ates, is quoted by a factory ii 
tor as saying: "By January 1 no 
children who come under the pro- 
visions of the recent act will be 
working." These reprisals, which 
will affect the pocketbooks of thou- 
sands of families, will, the manufac- 
turers hope, serve to crystallize pub- 
lic opinion toward a revision of the 
law. 

Decisions involving the right of an 
employe to use for his own advanci 
ment customers and information ob- 
tained while working for an empl 
were handed down recently by Jus 
tices Cohalan and Sbearn, of the Su 
preme Court of New York. Both 
decisions were to the effect that an 
ptnploye, where there was no written 
agreement limiting his activities, was 
justified in using the knowledge 
gained in his work for his own hene- 
'it, even though the business of a 
former employer was unfavorably af- 
fected by it One of the suits was 
that of the Pioneer Barber Towel 
Company against Bruney, who 
driver, and who engaged himself to 
drive a wagon of a rival concern, 
and did what he could to transfer the 
business of the customers with whom 
he was personally acquainted to his 
last employer. An injunction, re- 
straining Bruney, was applied 
and Justice Cohalan denied it. 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-date methods in Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy. 

Compasses adjusted. 

PIER NO 1. Established 1890 SEATTLE, WASH. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

^ALASKA HOTEL 

CORNER WESTERN AVENUE AND 

SENECA STREET 

New Building— New Furniture 

25 cents and up per Day 

Special Rates Per Week 

FREE BATHS 

PETER DESMORE, Proprietor 

SEATTLE 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 



Pho.ie Main 1202 

L. V. WESTERMAN 

CLOTHIER 

FURNISHER and HATTER 

ALASKA OUTFITTER 

220-222 First Avenue South, at Main 
SEATTLE 



Eureka, Cal. 



MERCANTILE LUNCH 

Is the place for a good and quick service 

233 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 

Teddy © Hagan 

Proprietors 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 

Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

612 Fourth St. - - Eureka, Cal. 



BONNEY-WATSON CO. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



PUGET SOUND 

NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. SMITH 
Four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
i Mitts, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor in New York Nautical College. 

Room 4187 ARCADE BUILDING 

Next Room to Masters, Mates and Pilots 

Association 

SEATTLE, WASH. 



I, I 



Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postofflce, letters addressed in care of 
the Sailors' Union Agency at Seattle can 

not bo held longer than 30 days from 

date of delivery. If members are unable 
ill or have their mail forwarded 
during that period, they ."Iimild notify 
the Agent to hold mail until arrival. 

Halp- Lawson, .T. .1. 

tail Larsen, Emanuel 
Andersen, Hjali ''■ 

Andersen, Alfred Mi s, John 

Andersen, Albln Moyer, Win 

Martlnsohn. P. A. 

Bucknam, .1. W. Mathlsen. Sigurd 

Fred Moore, C. R. 

Brown, 1 >. C. Mattson, Erick 

Christensen, Anion Mattson. J. -13»8 

Christensen, Albert Mlkkelsen. A. \V. 

Donovan, J. Morgan, w. 

Dougherty, -I. Nass, T. M. 

i ivrnes, L. E. Newland, I 

Edvords, John Nelson, Axel 

rohn Nordstrom, E. V. 

Engebretsen, Ed. Nevl 
Edson, I-' rank J. E 

sen, Marlus Ona, Sam 

Eugen, T. ; en. A. 122 

Fenes, I. Petterson, Harry 
Farridane, P. on. Hans 

Glademo, : son, Carl 

nundersen, ivtcr ' Carl, -1 

Rustafson, Karl Peterson. Carl, -1 

Grant, l lave Ins, Nlrk 

i VI. -X M. Rs nil" 

ii. John wald tsach 

,T «nsen, Olaf i '■ 

1 1 his. "i E. -l HT v ' W. 

Mill, c, Phankat, Hans 

i 'ernes, K. Sim ningh llm. < ». 
WaldemarSpelli i I 

isen, Fred Salvesen, B 

on, "Win. 

In nl'S. .11. J.ihall S. annil. i Killil 

Johnson, Andrew Sellken i' 

Johnson, Ernest Sinclair, Emanuel 
rohnson, P. M. h. T. 

Johnson, Ole Swensen 

rohnson Jorgen Strandevus Jai I; 
ll. d. C. P. 

Telcherl K»rl 
'•'ai.-ll. .1 Einar 

Karlson, Ingvald Torjuspn, G. T. 

"'inn Voss, U 

ian •-" : 1 1 1 Vlck, Tom 

n, Albln Ween, ( lie 

I. arson, i ilaf vv, .,,,,,. !<,». ,\. 

rd, John Wick, J. 
I. in leman, C. H. O 



K. K. TVETE 

Dealer In 

Clothing, Shoes, Hats and 

Gents' Furnishing Goods 

108-110 MAIN STREET 
Squire- Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY A YOUNG 

Manufacturers of all kinds of 8oda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 
A SQUARE~MEAL 

— Try - 

EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 

A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



SAILORS' OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS, 
SAILORS' SINGLETS 

Everything Union Made 

PAGE & SCH WARTZ 

Cor. Second and E Sts., Eureka, Cal. 






Tacoma Letter List. 

Cords. W. A. Olson. Martin E. 

Evertscn. Olof Patersnn. John 

Farrell. William Person. Fritz Leo- 

m, Arthur nard 

Johannsen, Christian Schml 

W. TIlMl 

Wictor Ullman, I 

Murphy, Dai 

When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



Carl Kristianson, who shipped on 
the bark "Nuanu" in September, 
W\2, from Honolulu to San Pedro, 
was on the bark "Allen" and 
schooner "Repeat" previously. Any- 
body knowing his whereabouts please 
notify his mother, Mrs. Anna Kris- 
tianson, Majornas, Route 6, M. 27, 
Lilla B. Nystrama St., Gothenborg, 
Sweden. 5-13-14 

Frank Mclson, who went as fire- 
man on the S. S. "Maye" from Phila- 
delphia to New Orleans, in May, 
1913, is inquired for by his mother. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify Mrs. G. W. Paruin, 
4309 Westminster avenue, W. Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

George Barrett, who, on November 
12, 1912, left the ship "Port Logan" 
at Newcastle, of which he was an 
apprentice, is inquired for by his 
mother, his father having died. Any- 
one knowing the whereabouts of this 
lost son please at once communi- 
cate with Amelia Barrett, 1 Wood- 
land Place, East Greenwich, Lon- 
don, England. 3-3-15 

Otto E. Bickel and John Sherman 
Rickel, brothers, who have not been 
heard of for many years, are in- 
quired for by their sister. They are 
both tall, light complexioned, and blue 
eyes. Any information regarding 
their whereabouts will be highly ap- 
preciated. Please address Miss Laura 
Bickel, 1591 East Ninety-third street, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 4-14-15 

Fred Riley, a colored seaman, last 
heard from at Genoa, Italy, and at 
other times from ports in Australia 
and at Liverpool, England, is sole 
heir to his mother's estate. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts kindly no- 
tify Mr. John E. Selkirk, Attorney- 
at-Law, 100 Erie Co. Bank Bldg., 
Buffalo, N. Y. 6-24-14 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTERS 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms, Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

EL). SWANSON, Prop. 



Eureka, Cal., Letter List 



Contreras, Julio 
Erlksen, Anton 
Kyrkslatt, Lars 
McKeating, R. 



Lawrence, Harry 
Lornas, Richard 
Nllsen, Nils 
Thorsen, Fredrick N. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Johan Hilmar Hansen, a seaman 
who was last heard from in Seattle, 
Wash., in 1911, is inquired for by his 
father. Anton Hansen, Nygaten 34, 
Moss, Norway. 5-13-14 

Alex McDonald, formerly of Dun- 
dee, Scotland, who has not been 
heard of for 22 years, but is thought 
to be sailing on the Pacific Coast, 
is inquired for by Jas. Perry, 30 
Bridge End, Buckpool, Buckie, Eng. 

5-13-14 

Knut Jensen No. 5018, a member 
of the Lake Seamen's Union, a 
native of Denmark, is inquired for 
by his wife, Lieschen Jensen, of 
Tangemunde, A 'Elbe Ostenerweg, X". 
7, Germany. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please notify the Lake 
Seamen's Union, 133 C'inton street, 
Milwaukee. Wis. 4-14-15 

Henry Smallwood, a native of New 
York, is inquired for by his mother. 
Anyone knowing his present where- 
abouts please notify the following 
address: Mary Smallwood, Academy 
of the Holy Name, 200 Fair Oaks 
Ave., Pasadena. Cal. 7-29-14 

W. A. Goodrich, who left the Brit- 
ish ship "Puritan" at San Francisco 
February 6, 1911, is inquired for by 
the British Consul-General at San 
Francisco. 

Charles Anderson, alias llelmik 
Helgesen. a native of Mvestad, Sta- 
vanger, Norway, age 70, is inquired 
for; last time heard from in 1904. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify his brother, B. H. Al- 
vestad, Jewal, Iowa. 






COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



13 



Portland, Ore. 

TRANSFER AND STORAGE 
For Quick Service Call East 4441. Resi- 
dence Phone Tabor 3. I give you a Claim 
Check for your baggage at home. Give 
me your work or we both lose money. 

Office: 
41 UNION AVE. - - PORTLAND, ORE. 

LTaDDnDnnannnnaDDDnnnannnnD 



NEW AND SECOND HAND 
CLOTHING 

WEINER'S BARGAIN 
HOUSE 

Shoes, Hats, Suitcases 

Furnishings and Tools 

French Dry and Steam Cleaning 

UNION SHOP 

35 NORTH THIRD STREET 

Corner of Cauch PORTLAND, ORE. 



P. ROSENSTEIN J. G. WOOD 

Workingmen's Store 

Importers and Dealers in 
FINE CUSTOM AND READY MADE 

CLOTHING 

Gent's Furnishing Goods, Hats, Caps, 
Boots, Shoes. Rubber and Oil Cloth- 
ing. Trunks. Valises, Etc. 
23 N. 3d St., nr. Burnside, Portland, Ore. 
Tel. Main 8295 ROSENSTEIN BROS. 



SQUARE DEAL 

RESTAURANT 

Best Meals on the East Side 

$5.50 Meal Ticket for $5.00 

Phone East 406 

371 BURNSIDE STREET 

PORTLAND - - OREGON 

CON. SILVER, Mgr. 



Willamette Cigar Store 

H. SORENSEN, Proprietor 

CIGARS, TOBACCO, 

CONFECTIONERY, FRUIT AND 

SOFT DRINKS 

Corner Front and Burnside, 

Portland, Ore. 

Portland, Or., Letter List. 



.WORKERS UNION, 




UN!OrW(STAMP 

Fictory 



Named shoes are frequently made in 
Non-Union factories 
DO NOT BUY ANY SHOE 
no matter what its name, unless it bears 
a plain and readable impression of this 
UNION STAMP. 

All shoes without the UNION STAMP 
are always Non-Union. 

Do not accept any excuse for absence 
of the UNION STAMP. 



Boot and Shoe Workers' Union 

246 SUMMER STREET, BOSTON, MASS. 
John F. Tobin, Pres. Chas. L. Baine, Sec.-Treas. 



DDnnnnnDDnnnDnDDDDDnDannDanDnnnnnnnnDnnnnnnnannnnnDnn 

VOTE AGAINST PROHIBITION B 

u , , - -. □ 




jgc w**"^ 




"Ale 

AND 

Porter 



DEMAND 



H 


ome 


N 


ews. 





PERSONAL LIBERTY H 



□ 

IN CHOOSING WHAT YOU g 

a 
□ 



7*3G>^ Of America ric^r 

, CJPYRIOHT &TRADE MARK REGISTERED I90gi H 

THIS IS OUR LABEL 

naDDanDnanDDanDnnDnannDannDaaDnLTjDnnaanDDDnnDaGnDDDOD 



WILL DRINK 

Ask for this Label when 

purchasing Beer, Ale 

or Porter, 

As a guarantee that it is 

Union Made 



Aberdeen, Wash. 



Bese, F. 

Bernahrdsen, Chas. 
Bjornlund, Axel 
Bugge, Mr. 
Christensen, H. P. 
Decas, O. 
Dolany, Willie 
Edstrom, John 
Ekberg, Hugo 
Fernandez, Frank 
Geiger, Joe 
Hecker, Wm. 
Halbeck, J. O. 
Holmstrom, Chas. A. 
Henriks, Waldemar 
Ingelbrigsten, O. 
Jensen, Christ 
Jensen, Wm. 
Jegstrup, Harold 
Johnson, Nils 
Jonsson, Karl 
Knopp, Fritz 
Kristiansen, Wm. 
King, J. L. 
Kelly, Patric 
Kjer, Magnus 
Knudsen, Richard E. 
Larsen, H. 
Leonhard, George 
Letchford, A. 
Lindblad, Konrad 
Lindberg, A. C. 
Lindholm, John 
Loescher, Joseph 
Miller, E. 
McKeating, R. 
Munchmeier, H. 
Miller, Andy M. 
Morgan, Tim 



Muller, P. 
Metts, John 
Moller, L. D. 
McConnell, David S. 
Mark, Thorwald 
Meckermann, Ernst 
Neuling, George 
Nielsen, H. -1253 
Olsen, Arthur 
Ohlsson. J. W. 
Osterberg, Henry 
Oglive, Wm. A. 
Palm, P. A. 
Pedersen, J. A. 

-1515 
Perkins, Paul 
Peterson, M. 
Rabel, John 
Reskran, George 
Rinkel, H. 
Rimmer, Chas. 
Schneider, J. 
Schneider, Fritz 
Swanson, Emil 
Soderlund, Uno 
Sorensen, Jorgen 
Shea, Oscar 
Schacht, H. 
Schultz. John N. 
Selin, Joe 
Salmelin, H. 
Saarinen, W. 
Tuhkanen, J. J. 
Urso, Geozzep 
Vinx, H. 
Windblad, M. 
Wheatcroft, L. E. 
White, Harry 
Westengren, C. W. 



HUOTARI & CO. 

Below Sailors' Union Hall, Aberdeen 

GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

and MEN'S FURNISHINGS 

Everything Guaranteed 

Union Made Goods 

Orders taken for Made-to-Measure 

Clothing 

HUOTARI & CO. 

320-322 So. F. St., Aberdeen, Wash. 

212 Eighth Street, Hoquiam, Wash. 

209 First Street, Raymond, Wash. 



Aberdeen, Wash., Letter List. 



Nielsen, N. C. 
Nilsen, -1054 
Nilsen, Harry 
Nordgren, Chas. 
Peitson, J. 
Peters, Walter 
Paaso, Andrew 
Pettersen, Karl 
Petersen, J. 
i ' i i son, Nels 
Risenius, Sv'en 
Rundhlad, Oscar 
Schmidt, JJeinrich 
Simensen, Isak 
Seheftner, Bernhard 
Thorn, A. L. -70 
Toves, H. C. 
Thorne, John 
Thompson, S. K. 
IV! by, Harold 
Wehrman, John 
Wlksten, Arvtd 
Wilson, John 
Walder. Olsen N. 

Packages. 
Glazer. Y. 
Gorgensen. Olaf 
Hansen, John 
MacGuire, O. F. 
Stanners, W. S. 



Albers, Geo. L. 
Andersen, -1118 
Arntzen, W., reg. 
Andersen, Andrew 
Arnell, John 
Burmeister, T. 
Byman, Alt. 

Bjorklund, G. 
Bowen, J. J. 
Davis, Frank 
Eriksson, -333 
Evensen, Krist 
Gustafsson, Chas. 
Gronros, Oswald 
Gueno, Pierre 
Hansen, -2275 
Hansen, Halfdan 
Holmroos, W. 
Hansen, Ove Max 
Hylander, Gustaf 
Jacobson, J. 
Kallas, August 
Kerr, Wm. 
Knappe, Adolph 
Kristiansen, Nils 
Kustel, V. J. 
Lad wig, Otto 
Dudtke, Emil 
Machado, Henry 
Munsen, Fred 

When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



When In Aberdeen Trade at 

BEE HIVE 

Very best union made Hickey Shirts, 
Oil Clothing, Eureka Boots, Hats, 
Shoes. Underwear, Beddings, Tobac- 
cos, and notions for seafaring men. 
NYMAN BROS. 
304 South F St., Aberdeen, Wash. 
Near Sailors' Union Hall 
Open Evenings 



ANNOUNCEMENT 

THE "RED FRONT" CARRIES A FULL 
STOCK OF 

UNION MADE CLOTHING, HATS, 

SHOES. COLLARS, SUSPENDERS, 

GLOVES, OVERALLS. SHIRTS 

A. M. BENDETSON 

321 East Heron Street - - - Aberdeen 

Exclusive Owner of "The Red Front" 



TO LET 

Very Desirable, Light 
and Roomy 

Stores and Basement 

— in the — 

Maritime Hall Building 

— on — 

49-59 CLAY STREET 

Between Embarcadero & Drumm Sts., 

SAN FRANCISCO 

Apply to I. N. HYLEN, 49 Clav St. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Iwar Westerberg, age about 50, 
sailing second mate on some steam 
schooner on the Pacific Coast, is in- 
quired for by Gus Englund. Any in- 
formation regarding the above named 
will be gladly received at 214 Jack- 
son street, San Francisco, Cal. 

1-27-15 

Theodore Krakan, last heard of in 
September 1911, at New Orleans, La., 
is inquired for by his mother. Any 
one knowing his whereabouts please 
notify Mrs. Ad. Krakan, Langenvehm 
38 I, Hamburg 22, Germany.— 8-25-15. 



Port Townsend, Wash. 



FRANK STHEVENS 

Deals exclusively In Union-Made 
CIGARS, TOBACCO, ETC. 

Call at his old Red Stand on 

Water Street, Port Townsend 

Next door to Waterman & Katz 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Ingvald Andreas Hansen, alias 
Andrew Hansen, a native of Nor- 
way, age about 36; tall, dark; last 
heard of July, 1905. His address 
then was, Andrew Hansen, Karluk, 
Kodiak Island, Alaska. He is in- 
quired for by his mother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify Staff Captain Robert Smith, 
district officer, native work, Alaska, 
Box 925, Wrangell. 4-3-15 

Wilhelm Ekelund, a native of 
Sweden, is inquired for by his 
brother, Axel Ekelund, New Harbor 
Hotel, Drumm street, San Francisco, 
Cal. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify the above ad- 
dress. 3-10-15 

Patrick McFee, who was cook on 
board the schooner "Robert Henry" 
on a voyage to Mexico last year, is 
inquired for by the U. S. Shipping 
Commissioner, at San Francisco, Cal. 

9-15-15 

George Alexander Sharman, a na- 
tive of Brooklyn, N. Y. About 28 
years of age, height 5 feet 9 inches, 
supposed to have sailed on the Great 
Lakes in 1907, is inquired for by 
M. L. Kin van, 1211 Mosher street, 
Baltimore, Md. 7-14-15 

Carl Janson, age 36, born in Was- 
tervik, Sweden; last heard of in Seat- 
tle six years ago. Anyone knowing 
his address please communicate with 
Erika Askenberg, 2280 86th street, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 

George Alfred Hall, last heard of 
on the Sch. "Sehome" in June, 1913, 
will please communicate with his 
brother, Walter Hall. Address 790 
18th street, Oakland, Cal. 

William McGrail, of Baltimore, 
Md., who sailed on the Atlantic and 
Gulf Coasts as cook for a number of 
years, is inquired for by his brother. 
George McGrail, 603 Dec-.iur street. 
New Orleans, La. 



Henry Ford announced on Sep- 
tember 25 that he has set aside $1,- 
000,000 to be used in a campaign for 
peace, and against the demand for 
preparedness. 

Although Federal Judge Anderson 
issued an injunction to restrain a 
strike of Fort Wayne, Ind., street 
railway employes, they nevertheless 
quit work on September 27. The) 
demand reinstatement of men said to 
have been discharged for membership 
in the union. 

Foes of the big Army and Navy 
programme in the Democratic party 
are planning for a meeting at Wash- 
ington in advance of the regular ses- 
sion of Congress to rally their forces. 
A call will be sent out within a few 
clays to members of Congress who 
are in sympathy with the movement 
to meet during the last week in No- 
vember. Representative Warren W. 
Bailey of Johnstown, Pa., former In- 
dianan, is taking the lead. He is 
making a canvass of Democratic 
members, through the medium of 
correspondence, and he says that op- 
position to a big Army and Navy is 
as strong as ever. 

Trouble along the Texas border to 
the west of Brownsville continues 
from depredations of irresponsible 
bands of outlaws who slip across the 
border and attack American settlers. 
When any of these bands are over- 
taken by the American patrol, fight- 
ing ensues, with disastrous results to 
the Mexicans. As the American 
troops do not pursue the bandits into 
.Mexico, they find shelter south of 
the border, and come back at every 
opportunity. General Nafarette, the 
Carranza officer in charge, has pro- 
claimed a neutral border of no man's 
land south of the boundary, in order 
to keep his own troops from assist- 
ing the bandits. It is now proposed 
by the Americans to use mountain 
guns along the border to shell out 
the marauders when they retreat into 
the neutral zone. Almost all of the 
casualties have been confined to the 
bandits. 

An idea of the great volume of 
business that recently has come t<> 
the steel concerns of Pennsylvania 
is to be had from the announcement, 
made by representatives of all the 
large companies, that they are filled 
with orders for the present year, 
and, from now on. only will accept 
orders for the year 1916. The orders 
for next year are coming forward 
in a great rush, they say, and this 
shows the boom is by no means 
temporary. These are for rails, cars, 
locomotives and structural material, 
independent of those for war ma- 
terials. It is said the present orders 
and inquiries for ordinary steel are 
the heaviest known in five years. 

The United States battleship "Mich- 
igan" led all other vessels of the 
battleship class for battle efficiency 
in 1915, according to an announce- 
ment by the Navy Department. The 
battleship "Texas" was second and 
the "Georgia" third in the list of 
nineteen \essels. The torpedolio.il 
: >n" led the lisl i" 

the destroyer class, tin- "Ml Dougal" 
being second and the "Fanning" 
third. In tile submarine class the 
"K 8" Stood lust, with the "C-3" sec- 
ond and the "II 3" third. The bat 
tleship "( lei u gia" led the list of 
twenty vessels of the battleship i 
in gunnery practice, The "Texas" 
was second and the "Wyoming" 
third. 



14 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 




One million head of beef cattle, it 
i^ announced, are being sought for 
delivery in Liverpool. 

\\ itli the addition of the five Pa- 
cific Mail ships to the fleet of the 
International Mercantile Marine, the 
number of it will be 130. 

A number of temporary aids to 
navigation have been established in 
Galveston Harbor by the lighthouse 
service pending the reconstruction of 
beacons and lights destroyed during 
the storm. 

Two libel suits for $500,000 each 

been tiled in Trenton, N. J., by 

the United States Asphalt Refining 

Company of New York city against 

Prince Line, Limited. Breach 

of contract is chat 

The Interocean Transportation 
Company has filed a suit against the 
M. A. Quina Export Company for 
alleged breach of a charter for the 
Norwegian steamship "Striklestad." 
I >amage's of $50,000 are asked. 

The Canadian Lake steamer "Fair- 
mount," which stranded on Plana 
Cays, in the Bahamas, while from 
Xew Orleans to Cienfuegos, with 
coal, is insured on a value of £19,- 
898, being 1,895 tons, built in 1903. 

Chicago yachtsmen will 1 
the Federal Government a plan to 
anize the power boats on the 
Great Lakes and elsewhere into a re- 
nt fleet for service in the 
it of war. It is suggested that 
officers and crews be trained in the 
use of rapid-lire guns, torpedoes, 
and wireless signaling equipment. 

The British steamship "Saint Leo- 
nards," the first vessel to clear from 
Philadelphia for Vladivostok by way 
of the Panama Canal, started Sep- 
tember 13 on her 48-day voyage to 
the Siberian port. Fifteen locomo- 
tives from the Baldwin Locomotive 
Works and 6,000 tons of steel rails 
from the Lackawanna Steel Co., 
comprised the cargo of the vessel. 

Mobile wrecking companies have 
been awarded contracts to salvage 
six steamships driven ashore near 
Galveston by the recent hurricane. 
Six months will be required to bring 
the vessels back to the Gulf through 
dredged channels. The contracts in- 
volve an expenditure of $272,000. The 
strainers are the "El Sud," of the 
Southern Pacific Company; the "Mor- 
awitz," (Austrian), and the "Eaton 
Hall." "Ribston," "Wallace," and 
"Harlesden," all British. 

After being ashore in the St. Law- 
rence for nine months the steamer 
"Hendonhall" has been floated. She 
went ashore at Point des Monts in 
November, 1914, on a voyage from 
Cardiff to Montreal, and was ice- 
bound during the winter. When the 
ice cleared in the spring it was found 
that the water in the vessel was still 
frozen solid, and salvage operations 
had to be further postponed. The 
"Hendonhall" is of 3,994 tons, built 
in 1901, her insured value being £32,- 

The keel of the new U. S. battle- 
ship "California" will be laid at the 
Xew York Navy Yard October 14. 
The "California,'' which will he con- 
ted on tlie same general lines 
as the "Mississippi" and "Idaho," will 
be the first electrically propelled war- 
ship of her class in the world. In a 
M-n-,1- her propulsion machinery will 
be in tin nature of an experiment. 
Her armament will include twelve 
14 in. guns, mounted in four triple 
turrets. She will displace 32,000 tons 
and will have special protection 
t submarines. 



LOOK!! LOOK!! LOOK!! 

White Palace Shoe Store 

L. WEISS 

Union Made Shoes for Men 

Exclusively 

28 EAST STREET, near Market, 
Opposite Ferry Depot SAN FRANCISCO 

Telephone Douglas 1619 
Repairing Done While You Wait, by the Latest 
Machinery. :: Work Called For and Delivered. 

WE USE ONLY THE BEST LEATHER MARKET AFFORDS 

SPECIAL NOTICE! 

Call or send for your Advertised Mail and 
PacKages as early as possible. 




Ollsson. Carl 
n, I. S. 
Olsen, B. O. L. 

C, 1315 
Olsen, Charles A. 
Olsen, G. N. 

■ ;. W. 

Ingvald 
i ilsen, J. A. 
i ilsen, Jena 



. Ole .1. 
Olson. C. B. 
Olson. C. O. -705 

.1. 
Olson, Morten 
Olson, Nick 
kar 
Olson. 1'. 
Olsson, Adrian 
Olsson, A. V. 



Olsen, John Arthur Olsson, A. W 

i ilsen, John < ilsson, B. O. S. 

Olson, N. -502 -1282 

Olsen, O. -1283 Olsson, Dolph 

Olsen, O. (ilsson. Eric 

Olsen. O. G. J. -11890sterberg, Henry 
Olsen, Ole, 



San Francisco Letter List. 

Letters at the San Francisco Sailors' 
Union Office are advertised for three 
months only and will be returned to the 
Post Office at the expiration of four 
months from date of delivery. 

Members whose mall is advertised in 
these columns should at once notify 
I. M. Holt, Headquarters Sailors' Union, 
San Francisco, to forward same to the 
port of their destination. 



Hansen, Norkard M. 



Abbors, Arne 
Abmeyer, Henry 

i. Albert 
Adams, Hugo 
Adolf sson, Fritz 
Aha. Jack 
Ahlfors, Arthur 
Ahlstrom, Ellis 
Aliokos, ilmori 
Akman, Joseph 
Aimer. John G. 
Andersen, Alfred 

(Hal 

sen, A. M. 
sen, John 
Andersen. N. -1649 



Anderson, Ernst 
Anderson, Fritz 
Anderson, < leo. 

in, Harry 
Anderson, H. K. 
Anderson, 1 Hiding 
Anderson, John C. 
Anderson, Joseph 
Anderson, < 
Anderson. Walter 
K. K. 

Andreasen, Karl 
Antonsen, II. -1372 
Antonsen. H. -17S3 



en, S. A. -1042 Antonson, Viktor 
Andersen, V. -992 Ashlund, Jas. ll. 
Anderson, Chr. -17G5 Augustin, Hermann 
Anderson, Ed Azevedo. Manuel T. 



en, Tellif 
nan, Axel 

an, Aug 
Hnrkman, Paul 
Bakkenson, P. J. 
Rakker. Haakon 
Ban. Martin 
Barrell, George 

. Ed 
Behrendt. Carl 

is, W. J. 
■ iez, !•"■ li\ 
Bensen, I. -2164 
Benter, H. 
Berklind. Gus 
Berry. David J. 
Bertelsen. Kristlan 
Beyerle, Rupert 
Biedeman, Aug. 
Bllko. E. -204!) 
Bjorkstrom, Artur 
Blair, Francis 



rt, Willy 
Blume, Earnest 
Blum, Ernest 
Boro, Severin S. 

nan. .in>k 
Bo as, Allan 

i. 1 1- in y 
Brandt. B. 
Bredemeyer, Elmer 
H. 

Brevick, Johan 
Broberg, Charles 
Brown, Jno. 
Brown, William 
Brunst, Frank 
Bruum, Aksel 
Burkly, J. J. 

, Charles 
Burke, Andrew 
Bush. H. S. 
Byloft, Charles 



Caen, P. 

ri, George I. 
Calson, Fred 

nell, D. C. 
Campbell, S. 
Campbell. Martin 

i, Peter 
Carlson, C. O. 
Carlson, C. R. 
Carlson, Joe 
Carlson, Martin 

son, John 
Caristrom, John 
Catt, Frederick 
Dahlkvist, Fred 
Daly, John 

n, -\. 

Daniel. J. C. 
Dnnielson. David 
l lay, William 

.1. Inacio n rnoar. F,d 
Penis. I. Dully, John 

Perengowski, Julius Duval, Benoit 
Ebersole. R. E. Elllngsen. Fred 

Echlln, Lester W. Emanuelsen. Karl 
Eckart. T. G. Engelhardt. Ferdi 

Eckstrand, Frank nand 



Cellan. John 
Christensen, Hans 
Christensen, Louis 
Christensen, Otto 
Christensen, R. 

L. P. 
Claus, John R. C. 
Clausen, CI. a 
Clausen, Chr. 
Clausen, I. 
Collier. H. S. 
Cordia, P. 
Corlon, R. A. 
Costantinos. Lay 
Dewetrak. C. 
I nanus. Willie 
Dixen, Ben 
Dixon, John 
Douglas. G. Sam. 
I »oj le, Wm. 



Edolf, C. 

las, Nils 
Elsenhart, N. 
Eisner, Max 
is. Axel 
Bliassen, Sigurd 
Ellefsen. Otto 
Fabrowski, T. 
Falcon, M. 
Fane. Jam*" 
Ferguson, B. 
Ferguson, .1. 
P. 
Fitzgerald. Wm. 



Enstrom, Carl 

i ,T, 
Erickson, E. R. 
Erickson, George 
Erickson, John 
Evansen. Louis 
Evans, Stanley C. 
Foster, Clias. 

iholm. Chas. J. 

Klrdlirks.il, 1 

Fredriksen, Berger 
Fredrlokson. F. 
Freiberg, Peter 
i g, Frank 



Fltinatrlok Pntrlck Friedrieh, H. 

George Frig, w 
Follan Tinmiai 
' John 

Gabrlelsen, Filing 
Gabrielsen, Peder 
Gallagher, Jas. 



Cart. George 
C.erner, Hans 
Gibbs, James 
Gilbert, A. 
Gorden. George 
Grantley, C. W. 



Funk. Bnrno 
Furtli. 

Gudmundsen. L. 
Oumas. Nicholas 
Gundersen, Kristian 
Gundersen, L. I. 
Gunderson, G. A. 
Gunderson, J. C. 
Gunderson. M. 
Gunvaldsen, 1. 
Lfsson, Ch 



ii inn. Nestor Guthre. R. 

n. J. Gutman. C. 

Gudmundsen. B. 

Haak. Reinhold us. Alex 

Hageros, Sam Hansen, F., -M?.~, 

Halbeck, O. TTansen, Hans O. 

Hall. H. Hansen, H. C. 

Hallenberg, Gustaf Hansen, H. P. 

Halvarsen. Henrv Hansen. J.: 
Hammergren, Oscar Hansen, M. -968 



Hansen, 
I Lansen 

l lanson, 
Hartog, 

Hau.'in. 

law kins 



i ilaf 
P. 

Thomas 
Harold 
Henrik 
John 
Karl 
Hans C. 
F. 



P. 



Hedenskog, John 
Heiberger. M. 
M. 

H. 
inlander, John 
Heldt. Charles 

Helm, r. Fred 

Ikonem, Joe 
Illig, Gustave 

Jackson, Peter 
Jaglsch, Magnus 
Jaklsh, Max 

en. Alfred 
Jansen, Jakob 
Jansson, Jonas 
larosinski. Feliks 

en, Carl 
Jensen, C. 
Jensen. H. 
Jensen, Hans 
lensen. Halford 
Jensen. Henry 

n, J. F. 

lens,.;,, Knud 

Jensen, Thoyus 
Jespersen, Christ 
Jespersen, Martin 
Johansen, Arvid 

Joha risen. Carl J. 
Johansen, Johan 

i. Gustaf 
Kallasman, ic. 
g, Arvid 
I. Wiktor 
Kayser, Chas. 
Kas\ i. Theodore 
Kerr. Wm. 

Klngstrlm, G. 
Klnlock, Wm. 

Kips to, Clias. 
Klebingat. F. 
Kleishman. Frank 
Klepzig, Otto 
Klutzke. Otto 



G. 



Laakso, 


Frank 


1 .aim , 


Uex V. 


Lulu. August 


Larsen, 


A. C. 




C. A. -1904 


Larsen, 


Finwald 


Larsen, 


J. -1386 


Larsen, 


John 


Larsen. 


Julius 


Larsen, 


Pete 


Larson, 


Alfred 


1. arson. 


S. G. 


Larsson 


, Karl 


Larsson 


. K. E. 


I.arsson 


Ragnar 



/.aula. Victor 
Lauritzen, i ii 
Laws, Harry 
on, J P. 
in, Mace 
Leelkaln. Martin 
Leep, Gus 
l.elrevaag, H. J. 
Leonhard, G. 
Leroen. Lars 
Leverridge. H. 
Lewald, Harry A. 

Makl, Ivar 
Malland. O 
Manfred, Einar 

Manse. Peter 
Markus, Geo. 
Markwarett, Carl 

Marquels. Frank 
Martensen, J. C. 

2191 
Martens. Hans 
Martens, Paul 
Martin, A. 
Martin. H. 
Martin. John B. 
Marx. Thorwald 
Mathiassen, Sigurd 
Matta. Humberto 
Mattson. Charles 
Mnttsnn. J. 
McKenzie, John 
McKenzie, M. C. 



ksen, T. 
Higgins. F. 
Hilderhranoh. A. 
Holberg, Oluf 

i. W. -2304 
Holmquist. F. 
Holm, Arthur 

a, Clias. P. 
Hoist. B 
Hoose, Frank 
Hord, Charlie 
Hoversen. Carl 
Hoye, Haakon 
J. -2298 
tz. Emll 
, C. F. W. 



Ingebretsen, Olaf 
Insunso. Francisco 

Johanson, E. A. 

-2247 
Johansen, S. A. 
Johanson. HMw-vrd 
Johanson, II. R. O. 
Nathaniel 
Johannson, Nils 
Johansson, C. -2094 
Johansson. J. R. 
Johnsen, C. B. 
Johnsen, J. -2.169 

\. ""77 
Johnson, A. K. 
Johnson, E. G. -227 
Johnson. Eric 
Johnson. Gus 
Johnson. John 
Jones. Rerthon 
Jorgensen, Fred 
Jungberg. L. 
.lunge, Heinrich 

Knapp, Gottop 

Knohl, Louie 
Knappe, Adolpli 
Knudsen, Daniel 
Kolsted. A. 
Konstatin, Anist 
Kook. Herman 
Koiner. Fie.l 
Koso, Petter 
Krlstensen. K D. 
Kristiansen. Jakob 
Kruk, J. 
Kuhn, John 

Lewis. Roht. W. 
Lindekrantz, F. 
Lindeman, C. 1 1. O. 
Llndenkrantz, Chas. 
Llljendahl. Ludvlg 
Lindroth. Erik 
Link. Geo. 

■ I. Charles 
Livingston, Edward 

J. 
Ljung, Gustaf 
Loine, Axel V. 
Loland, Dudw ig 
Lonau. John 
Loren, A. 1. 
Lorentsen, Karl 
Lorin, C. -1111 

Lul.org, W. 

Luckman, E. 
Ludwlg, Jack 

Lun.11.erg. ■ 
Lundberg, Torsten 
Lunderen, Colmar 

Lundstrom, John 
Lunsmann. Henry 
Lybeck, Thomas 
Lynch, James 

McLaughlin, M. 

M.Lellan, J. 
McMahon, Jack 
Meislahn, II. 
Melba, Chas. 
Menk. Billy 
Mertensen. Henry 
Meyer. Ernest 
Meyer. F. 
Meyers. Max 
Mi. haelsen. Johan 
Midllng. Marentz 
Miller, Louis 

Winford 
Moore. Albert 
Morgen. L. 
Mortensen, Geo 
Mortensen, M. P. 

Milller. Tliom 
Muntsu, Max 
Murphy, J. 



Nagel, 


A. 


Nlemeyf 


r, Oscar 


Nedsen 


John B. 


Xewl.er 


. II 


Nelsen, 


Alhln C. 


N i I sen , 




Nelson. 


Alvln 


Nllssen. 


Harrv 


Nelson. 


C. 


Nllsson. 


Hialmar 


Nelson, 


Fred 


Nonberg, Gustaf 


Nelson. 


John 


Nor. Ni 


els 


Nelson. 


John B. 


Nordlof, 


Sigurd 


Nerhv. 


Kristlan 


Norman 


Olaf 


Nielsen 


C. F. -1025 


Norris, 


N. A. 


Nielsen. 


Edwin N 


Norton. 


Edgar 


Nielsen 


H. F. -1196 Nunner, 


Albert A 


Nielsen 


Nils 


Nunne, 


Victor 


\'i,-ls,-ii 


Valdemar 


"Vvmnn. 


OqVo r 


Nielsen 


W. C. -122 


Nyross, 


Julius 


Oherg, 


Oscar 


Ohland, 


Chas. 


O'Brien 


R. F. 


Oleman, 


Henry 



Para, E. 11. 

I ash. 

Paul, 
Paulman, Geo, 

a, A. 
Paulsen. N. 

' E. 
I, Martin 

Peart 
Pears 

Pedersen, Carl 
Pedersen, H. 



Owen, t led 

Petersen, O. -1696 

Petersen, Otto 
Petersen, C. V. 
Peterson, G. 
■is, .a, Johan 
•rson, O. -1." 
Peterson, Oscar 
Peterson, Tom 
Peterson, Wm. 
Petersson, C. -131 
Pettersson, Einar 
Pinkiert. C B. 
1560 Plom. Charles 



I.. -1167 

Pergher. Charles 
Persson, John 

! S. 

Peters, Win. 

Kinar 
Petersen, Niels 
Quigiey. Robert E. Qulnn, William 
Raalsen, F. Rltcher, J. 

Raaum, Henrik RI 



Plottner. Alt 

T. 

Poknandt, H. 

I'nmmw. Jon 
Post. Albert 
Preusse, Fred 

atus, Aug 
Punls, Antoni 



Randolph. J. S. 
Rank, W. 
Rasmussen. J. A. 
-sen. Paul 



Rivera. John 
Roberts, Fredrick 
Roberts, Griff 
Roberts, John 



,11, Werner Rohde, Fritz 
l. Ernst Rojahn, A. A. 



Rutland, Lars O. 

a). lad. A. 
Rosenquist, A. 
Rotter, R. 
Hundquist. O. 
Ryan. James 
Sneider, G. 
Soderberg, R. 
Solberg. Bernt 
Sorensen. Anton 

Sorei 

Sorensen, Jens 
Sorensen, L. A. 
Sorensen, s 
Sorensen, Vigo 
Spanas, Nick 
Spanon. James 
Steger, Karl 

rt. J. H. F. 
Stenherg, Alfred 
Stenherg. Gus 

Id. John 
Stintman. J. 
Strand. Charley- 
Strand. Konrad 
Btrasdin, W. 
Stromberg. O. 
Substad, Pete E. 
Sundberg, K. K. 
Svendson. J. 
Svensen. Albert 
Soensen. C. J 
Svindlng, Knud 
Swanson, B. 
Swanson, E. 
Swanson, Martin 
Swanson, O. 

Thorsen. Rolf 
Thorsen, Theodore 
Tierney. M 
'I'lerney, Pat 

Tlttman, A. 
Torjussen, G. T. 
Tollinger, A. 

Tomberg. Matt -59: 
Tonzel, R. 
Traynor. John 
Trledrich, H. 
Tupplts, C. 



Whiteside, Fred 
Wihtol, J. 
Williams, J. C. 
Williams, John 
Willman, C. 
Wilson. J. W. 
Wlnton. J. A. 
Witt. Otto 
Wold. Olaf -1285 
Wollesen, A. Chr. 
Wremmer. George 
Zurenberg. Fritz 
Zwartz, M. C. 
Zweyberg, John 



-878 



I: inink. Herman 
Retail, Otto 
Rickes. G. S. 

Ki, S, I leill 

Klmmer. C. M. 
Rinta, Karl 

a Penning 
Samuelsen, 
Sandberg, John 
Robert 
Sanders. S. 
Sanderson, Alfred 
Sandstrom. Ivar 
Sanne, Rudolf 
Sass. John 
Saul. Fritz 
Saunders. Jnmes 
Savage. Roland 
Saxby, C. H. 

ite, A. O. 

nz, Charles 
Sehnolder. H. 

!, P. R. 
ItZ. F. J. 
Scott. A 
Seberg, G. 
Sellers. Wm. G. 
Silman, E. 
Simonsen, S. -2046 

S. A. 
Rivers, Frank 
Skjellerup, Aksel 
Skoglund. Harry 
Skold, C. v. 
Slinning. John 
Smith, Donald 
Smith. L. K. 
Smith. Lyman M. 
Tamlsar, P. 
Tarnman, K. 
Thewas, E. J. 
Tho, John 

"ii. Emil 
Thompson, Johan 

n, John 

,,ll, I iloof 
Max 
Gus 
Th. .ron, Motor 
Thorsen, Chr. 
Ulman, John 

Van Dohlan, George Villemayer, Walter 
Van Frank, W. O. Vogel, Gus 
Verney, Paul 
Wacner. Wil 
Waldman. I '■ 
Wal'.en, John 
Walter, John 
Wanag, J. 
Wang, E. 

r, Charlie 
Kar 
Wheaterott. L. E. 
White, J. D. 
White, Peter 

Carl 
Walter 
Zerket, B. W. 

Ernst 



PACKAGES. 



Apply to Secretary of Sailors' Union 
of the Pacific. 

Nor, Nils 
Olsen, Arne 
Olsen. Carl -1101 
Pennlngrud. Ludwlk 
Persson. Oscar 
Petersen, Aage 
Raasch, O. 
Raaum. Henry 
Rsrlv. Frnns 
Rathke, Reinhold 
Relursen. A. L. 
Roberts. John 
Sorensen, Pete 
Strasdin. A. W. 
Wakely. R. E. 
Winje. Ililmar 
Wurthman. W. L. 



Anderson, A. 
Berling. J. B. 
Billington, Martin 
Ceelan. John 
Ellefsen. Otto 
Furth. Richard 
Hansen, Karl 
Hansen, Marius 
Hansen, O 
Hartog, John 
llendi iKSen. Hag 
hart 

n. Walter 
Hilllg, Alb 

on, A. L. 
Johansen. Emll 

isen, Aluf 



Phones: Office, Franklin 7756 

Res.. Park 6950 
Office Hours: 9 a. m. to 6:30 p. m. and 
7:30 to 8:30 p. m. by appointment 
Saturdays 9 a. m. to 1 p. m. 

DR. B. J. STICREL 
DENTIST 

No. 2 Golden Gate Avenue, at Market, 

Golden Gate and Taylor Streets 

Continental Building, on Second Floor 

San Francisco, Cal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



15 



The German Savings 
and Loan Society 

(THE GERMAN BANK) 

Savings Incorporated 1868 Commercial 

526 CALIFORNIA STREET 

San Francisco, Cal. 

(Member of the Associated Savings 

Banks of San Francisco.) 

The following Branches for Receipt and 

Payment of Deposits only: 

MISSION BRANCH, S. E. Corner Mis- 
sion and 21st streets. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, S. W. 
Corner Clement street and 7th avenue. 

HAIGHT STREET BRANCH, S. W. 
Corner Halght and Belvedere streets. 

JUNE 30, 1915: 

Assets 160,321,343.04 

Deposits 67,362,899.35 

Capital actually paid up in 

cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve & Contingent Funds 1,958,443.69 

Employees' Pension Fund 199,164.12 

Number of Depositors 66,965 



H. W. HUTTON 

ATTORN EY-AT-LAW 

Pacific Building, Rooms 527-529 

Cor. Fourth and Market Sts. 

Phone Douglas 315 San Francisco 

Maritime Matters and Criminal Law 

a Specialty 



Phone Kearny 3373 

DENVER HOUSE 

221 THIRD STREET 

400 Rooms, 35 and 50 cents per day, or 
$2 to $2.50 per week, with all modern 
conveniences. Free Hot and Cold Shower 
Bath on every floor. Elevator Service. 
AXEL LUNDGREN, Manager. 



HOTEL EVANS 

Corner Front Street and Broadway, 
Opposite Pacific Coast S. S. Co. Pier 
400 large, light rooms. Rates, 25c 
per night up; $1.25 week; $5.00 
month. Baths, Reading Room. Office 
open all night. Best place near 
waterfront. Investigate. 



Phone Garfield 833 E. Benvenutl, Mgr. 

HOTEL FAIRFIELD 

250 Large Sunny Rooms Furnished Up- 
to-date. With all Latest Conveniences 
and Elevator Service. Rates: 25, 30 and 
50 cts per Day. $1.25 per Week and Up. 
Free Baths — Large Reading Room 
1325 STOCKTON STREET 
Near Broadway San Francisco, Cal. 



D. EDWARDS & SONS 

UNION STORE 

Fair Prices. Reliable Good*. 

50 East Street, 

San Francisco 

GUARANTEED OIL CLOTHING 



PATRONIZE HOME INDUSTRY 
We originate Souvenir Folders, Cards, 

Society and Commercial Printing. 
Silk and Satin Banners, Badges, Sashes 

and Regalia — All Union Made 

Union Label Roll Admission Tickets and 

Bar Checks 

WALTER N. BRUNT CO. 

860 Mission Street 

Union Label Paper and Envelope* 



Kearny 3863 

JENSEN $ NELSEN 
Gent's Furnishing Goods 

Cigars and Tobacco 

Uniforms, Caps, Hats, Shoes 

114 EAST STREET Near Mission 



JORTALLBROS.EXPRESS 

Stand and Baggage Room at 

206 EAST ST., San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 5348 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Capt. Chas. J. Swanson 

CLASSY CLOTHIER 

HATTER AND FURNISHER 

DOUGLAS SHOES 

UNIFORMS 



Gold Braid and Gold Wreaths 
of All Descriptions 



Phone Douglas 1082 

139 EAST STREET - - - SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Between Merchant and Washington 



See that this label (in light 
jblue) appears on the box in 
which you are servecL 



Is&uerJ by Auifiorityof tne Cigar Mat&s International Union of America 

Union-made Cigars. 

(fttliS €fltrfi$. TW tto O^n ooouiMd IMIiIj to. tew ban Bada *• IICWjCS tMw 

i MOIIGI CF THE OCM BAHIU 'lltTLftMTIOIUL UW0M erf Amiici. u ouiioxt devoted to the Id- 
Miictmrotort»eHOIW.MAlDiWalidlNTUlttnWmtIAJitOFTHtOlAr£ Tb«nfer»»» I WW 

■ M»» Ci«f5 to ill sra<A« ihrowlKxjt U* world 

' Ull^u<g«Mmii»wUiuUlalWbopu>sbKl<aw«nrjtolM 



F«C 
*«* SIMILE 



9 pUIUIMO *WJ"J W\*9* 

Q If &U46U*4, PKSUktlt, 
V CM II! of 



UK U 



8TAM1- 



J. MILLER 

124 EAST STREET Garfield 7690 

Union Store 

HATS, CAPS, 

FURNISHING GOODS, 

ETC. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN. 
San Francisco. 

Blom, J. Petterson, Carl 

Ekeland, Will Hj. Thorsen, Ole 
Hakansson, Ingvar Thorstensen, H. 



The James H. 
Barry Co. 

"THE STAR" PRESS 

PRINTING 

1122-1124 MISSION ST. 

SAN FRANCISCO 



TOM WILLIAMS 
Tailor 

28 SACRAMENTO ST., near Market 

Phone Douglas 4874 

ONLY EXCLUSIVE UNION 

TAILOR ON THE FRONT 

'Nuf Sod 



Fred Marjama, a native of Russia, 
age 36, has not been heard from since 
1908, at Buffalo, N. Y. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please 
notify his brother. J. Marjama, 51 
S,., lt h St., New York, N. Y. 9-1-15 



BEST SMOKE ON EARTH 

RED SEAL CIGAR 

UNION MADE 

RED SEAL CIGAR CO., MANUrACTURERS 

133 FIRST STREET, S. F. 
Phone Douglas 1660 



BANK OF ITALY 

San Francisco Los Angeles 

San Jose San Mateo 

The Story of Our Growth 

As Shown by a Comparative 
Statement of Our Resources. 

December 31. 1904 $285,436.97 

December 31, 1905 J1.021.290.80 

December 31, 1906 $1,899,947.28 

December 31, 1907 $2,221,347.35 

December 31, 1908 $2,574,004.90 

December 31, 1909 $3,817,217.79 

December 31, 1910 $6,539,861.49 
December 31, 1911 $8,379,347.02 
December 31,1912 $11,228,814.56 
December 31,1913 $15,882,911.61 

Dec. 31,1914, $18,030,401.59 

J u ne30,1915,$19,080,264.20 

NUMBER OF DEPOSITORS, 53,946 



FRENCH AMERICAN 
BANK OF SAVINGS 

Savings and Commercial 



108 SUTTER STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO 



Resources . .$7,700,000 

Member of Associated Savings Banks 
of San Francisco 

United States Depository for 

Postal Savings Funds 

DIRECTORS 

G. Beleney J. M. Dupas 

J. A. Bergerot John Ginty 

S. Bissinger J. S. Godean 

Tjpon Bocqueraz Arthur Legallet 

O. Bozlo Geo. W. McNear 

Charles Carpy X. De Pichon 



News from Abroad. 



□□□□□□□□□□□aDnnnnDnnnnonnn 

INFORMATION WANTED. 



Samuel Dickson, a seaman, age 
about 40 years, son of Moffett Dick- 
son, deceased, of Belfast, Ireland, or 
any person knowing his whereabouts, 
is requested to communicate at once 
with the undersigned in connection 
with a legacy. A. R. Smith, U. S. 
Shipping Commissioner, Philadelphia, 
Pa. 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of John Burke, No. 2, a member of 
the Marine F. O. and Watertenders' 
Association of the Great Lakes, last 
heard of in Chicago, will please com- 
municate with Mrs. Julia Noonan, 
276 Twelfth street, Jersey City, N. J. 

William Walker, a native of Island- 
magee, Antrim Co., Ireland, is in- 
quired for by his nephew. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts kindly com- 
municate with John Walker, Geddis, 
7 Willovbank St., Brookbnus, Win- 
nipeg, Manitoba, Canada. 



The new British budget announced 
by Chancellor McKcnna includes 
sharp advances in the income tax, 
in the tariff taxes, and in the addi- 
tion of more articles to the dutiable 
list of imports. 

Word has been received by the 
American Museum of National His- 
tory that Donald B. McMillan and a 
party of six explorers who left New 
York in 1913 to explore and chart 
what was supposed to be Crocker- 
land, in the Arctic Ocean, were safe 
and that the relief ship "Cluctt," later 
sent with supplies to the McMillan 
party, reached its destination. 

An attack of Haitian rebels on an 
American force near Cape Haitien re- 
sulted in the killing of forty Haitians 
and the wounding of ten Americans. 
The disarming of the natives con- 
tinues as the marines advance into 
the interior. General Rameau, com- 
manding 500 native troops, has 
agreed not to oppose the opening of 
the railroad and the taking of sup- 
plies into Gonaives. 

Premier Arthur Sifton announces 
that .i lull will be introduced in the 
next session of the Alberta Legisla- 
ture, with the full approval of the 
Government, giving equal suffrage to 
men and women. As this measure 
conveys also the right to vote in Par- 
liamentary elections it will place Al- 
berta with New Zealand and Aus- 
tralia as the only places in the Brit- 
ish Empire where men and women 
have equal rights. 

James Keir Hardie died of pneu- 
monia at Glasgow on September 26. 
He was a Labor member in Parlia- 
ment and the leader of the peace 
element in the British Socialist party. 
James Keir Hardie was born in 
Scotland August IS, 1856, and worked 
underground as a pit boy and pit 
man from the age of 7 until he was 
24. He early became well known 
as a speaker in the temperance move- 
ment, but eventually became promi- 
nent in labor and other advanced 
democratic and socialistic circles. 

The Associated Press has been offi- 
cially informed that Japan has noti- 
fied China that unless Japan's de- 
mands regarding jurisdiction over the 
Koreans residing in Chentao, in the 
Kirin region of Manchuria, are ac- 
cepted, Japan will pursue her own 
course in supporting her claim, by 
military force if necessary. The Jap- 
anese claims, it is stated, are based 
on the May, 1915, agreement between 
China and Japan. China maintains 
that Chentao is not mentioned in 
this agreement and that the previous 
agreement holds good. 

The long-threatened Austro-Gcr- 
man offensive in the Balkans, with 
the added menace of Bulgaria, has 
begun in earnest. Almost simulta- 
neously with the rupture of diplo- 
matic relations between Sofia and 
the entente powers, an Austro-Ger- 
man army, estimated at 400,000 men, 
with an enormous weight of heavy 
artillery, started to attack- Serbia 
from the north and west, and, ac- 
cording to the Berlin official report, 
crossed thi Drina, Danube and Save 
at many points and firmly established 
itself on the Serbian side. The \n 

glo French t roops, which were landed 

at Saloniki with the taeil consent of 

the Greek Government, arc b 

hurried northward to assist Serbia 
and, if possible, keep the Bulgarians 
from capturing the Saloniki N'ish rail- 
road, the '■nl by which the 
Serbians can be fed with munitions 
of war. 



16 



(<)\ST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



With the Wits. 



All Hope GoneL — Her Fiance <liis 
first appearance in swimming cos- 
tume')— What's the matter, dear? 1 
i ii m't j on know me? 

His Fiancee — Oh, Jack! 1 was 
afraid it was you. — Judge. 



"Every one in our family is some 
kind of animal," said Jitnmie to the 
amazed preacher. 

"Why, you shouldn't say that!" the 
good man exclaimed. 

"Well," said Jimmie, "mother's a 
dear, the baby is mother's little lamb, 
I'm the kid and dad's the goat." 
Ladies' Home Journal. 



The Test — Little Eda one day 

turned to her mother, who was a 
widow, and said: 

"Mama, do you really and truly 
love me?" 

"Why, of course, my dear. Why 
do you ask'" 

"And will you prove it to me?" 

"Yes. if I can." 

"Then go marry the man around 
the corner who keeps the candy- 
storc." — T.adics' Home Journal. 



Taylor's Nautical Academy 

Established 1888 

Consular Building, Corner Washington and 

Battery Streets. Opposite New Custom 

House, San Francisco. Cal. 

THIS Ol.l i AM) N< ITEWl IRTHY SCHOOL 

Is mi. i. i i and personal supervision 

of CAPTAIN HENKY TAYLOR and equip 

!»-.] with mI! modem appliances to Illustrate 

and teach an 5 branch of Navigation. 

The class of teachers of Navigation in the 
past have linen iho.se having simply a 
knowledge of Navigation, an. I Navigation 
only. Conditions have changed, and the 
American seamen demand a man as a 
teacher with higher attainments than one 
who has only the limited ability of a sea- 
man. Tli.' Principal of this School, keeping 
nils aiw:i>s in view, studied several years 
the Maritime Law. ■ and Is now. In addition to being a thorough teacher of 
Navigation ami Its kindred subjects, a regularb admitted Member of the Bar. 
There is no standard of education required of a pupil entering the School, 
for no matter how Ignorant the seaman may he. even in the rudiments of 
common edu aptain Henry Taylor will leach and raise him from the 

depths of ignorance to the height of the avcuiuc well-informed man. and in a 
comparatively short interval of time. 






Upholding American 
PROSPERITY 




Reverse English. — Card in a 
window — "Bearded lamb chops." 

Ad in Chicago Tribune— "Situation 
wanted. Chauffeur, married, abso- 
lutely sober; no other bad habits." 

In a New York paper — "To rent. 
Large, handsomely furnished room, 
private family; almost private bath." 

The American Magazine says of 
the "Lady cop" who policies a mi- 
ning camp: "Ex officio she is the 
mother of three children." Whadya- 
, "ex officio"? — Boston Tran- 
script. 



Not Worrying. — "Mandy," said the 
old woman to her daughter just 
back from a day's washing. "Mandy, 
whut-all did Mis' Sally done 
t' yo'?" 

"She done say," repeated Mandy 
solemnly and impressively, "'Mandy, 
does vo' know yo' persesses a im- 
mor-tal soul?'" 

"I. an' sakes. Mandy! An' whul 
did yo' respon'?" 

■'All saved." answered Mandy 

flippantly, "Ah don' care!"— Times 

of Cuba. 



An Invitation 

We invite deposits from every one — 
rich, poor, old and young. We recog- 
nize no classes, but treat large and 
small depositors with the same cour- 
tesy and consideration. 

HUMBOLDT 

SAVINGS BANK 



733 MARKET 8TREET. Near Fourth 
SAN FRANCISCO 



BAGLEY'S 

Old Colony 

THE HIGHEST TYPE OF 

TOBACCO PACKED IN 

10c TINS, ALSO 16 OZ. 

GLASS JARS 



UNION LABEL OF THE 

UNITED HATTERS OF N. A. 

When you are buying a FUR HAT, either 
soft or stiff, see to it that the Genuine Union 
Label is sewed in it. The Genuine Union 
Label is perforated on the four edges exactly 
the same as a postage stamp. If a retailer 
has loose labels in his possession and offers 
to put one in a hat for you, do not patronize 
him. Loose labels in retail stores are counterfeits. 

JOHN W. SCULLEY, President MARTIN LAWLOR, Secretary-Treasurer 

Rooms 72-73 Bible House, New York City 




^<?TFrV 



STRICTLY UNION STORE 

J. COHEN & CO. 

BALTIMORE CLOTHING STORE 

72 EAST STREET, OPPOSITE FERRY POST OFFICE 

SUITS MADE TO ORDER — UNION LABEL 
NOTICE! BOSS OF ROAD 
OVERALLS— PRICE, 70 CENTS 

Phone Douglas 1737 

Demand the Union Label 



The key to 
So make up 
by buying one 
for only 50c. 
way to toarli 
the vital prin 
keep the key, 
the I'.ank by 
Do what you 
Banks on Sale 



Prosperity is Saving 
your mind to prosper 

c.f Hale's $1.00 Hanks 
It is the best possible 
the children thrift and 
clples of saving. We 
and you can only open 
bringing It to Hale's 
wish with the money 

at Transfer Desk. 




Igooo poop* . 
Market at Fifth 






J 



DnDnnnnnDnnnnnnnDnnnnanDnnnDnaanDDDDnnaananaDnnnnDnDC 

a 

a 
p 

a 
j 
d 
a 
j 
a 
□ 
o 
a 



Christensen's Navigation School 




■ TOBACDD WORKERS 



3 lisstd CpitAullnnty of the 




ifmflNATlOHAL | UTVIOIV 

union. 






Established 1906 

116 DRUMM STREET, SAN FRANCISCO 

(SCANDINAVIAN SAILORS HOME) 

Under Capt. Christensen's per- 
sonal and undivided supervision, 

pupils of this favorably known C 

school are taught all up-to-date re- I 

quirements for passing a successful = 

examination before the U. S. In- - 

spector. As only a limited number = 

i if pupils will be accepted at one = 

time, delay and loss of time will [ 

be avoided while preparing for ex- - 
amination. 

REPAIRING OUR SPECIALTY 

THE POPULAR PRICE JEWELRY STORE 

715 MarKet Street, San Francisco 

NEAR CALL BUILDING 

Jewelers, Watchmakers, Opticians 

James Jt. Sorensen 

&., *»< *.«. SOUVENIRS 




LUNDSTROM KATS 

Are made in San Francisco and sold 
in 4 Stores: 
1126-28 MARKET STREET 
2640 MISSION STREET 
605 KEARNY STREET 
26 THIRD STREET 

ALL UNION HATS 

iTSAJViUEL 

The Old Union Store 

CLOTHING $ GENTS 
FURNISHING GOODS 

Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, Bags, 

Boots, Shoes, Rubber Boots and 

Oil Clothing of All Kinds, 

Watches, Jewelry, Etc. 

693 THIRD STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 

Opp. S. P. Depot at Third & Towniend 



Justice to All. Please Give Us a Trial 
and You Will Be Convinced. 



"YOUR HATTER" 
FRED AMMANN 



72 Market Street 
San Francisco 



Union Hats 



ONI BUSTER 

OVERALLS & PANTS 



UNION MADE 



IS 





t 




FOR THE SEAFARING PEOPLE OF THE WORLD. 
Official Paper of the International Seamen's Union of America. 



A Journal of Seamen, by Seamen, for Seamen. 



Our Aim: The Brotherhood of the Sea. 



Our Motto: Justice by Organization. 



VOL. XXIX, No. 6. 



SAN FRANCISCO, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1915. 



Whole No. 2352. 



WAR AND THE "INTERNATIONAL." 

The Grim Contrast of To-day and To-morrow. 



Labor's attitude toward war has been fairly 
well denned during the past year. 

Generally speaking Labor is opposed to war 
because war is opposed to the interests of the 
world's civilization. Yet, Labor fights in all 
wars. 

Labor suffers and perishes in all wars. Labor 
bears the greatest burdens in all wars although 
it would be difficult to prove that Labor ever 
profited from any war. 

Labor has certainly never profited from mili- 
tarism because Labor interest is the interest of 
the vast multitude of the common people of all 
nations, who from time immemorial have been 
the poor, betrayed powers of the rulers and the 
ruling classes. 

It always has been, and still is to the interest 
of Labor — and in fact to the interest of civiliza- 
tion — that the workers of all nations shall rec- 
ognize one another as brothers, and to join in 
the common task of advancing the welfare of 
all working people everywhere. There should 
be no frontiers in the labor movement. 

These concrete and self-evident facts must be 
brought to attention of the world's toilers until 
the most humble of them see the light that is 
dawning, the light of truth and justice and fra- 
ternity, that will put an end to this cruel and 
needless war and forever prevent a recurrence. 

Volumes upon volumes have been written 
about this senseless war. The Journal, too, has 
contributed its mite. But in all the material 
available none is more worthy of careful perusal 
than the thoughts and sentiments committed to 
paper by I. H. Sloan, and published in the Lon- 
don Labor Leader of recent date: 

Comrades of Yesterday. 

"Yesterday I, an Anglo-Saxon, gave you my 
hand in friendship, in unity, and in brotherhood. 
Yesterday you, a Saxon, toiled the same long 
hours side by side with me, your comrade. Oft 
we had a cheering glass together, yet we grum- 
bled as the weary day wore on and we felt the 
utter tiredness of toil. Oft we stood together 
for a higher wage, a better chance in life, and, 
in Trafalgar Square — do you remember? — we 
sang the "International" day after day together. 
You and I — we starved rather than take the 
blackleg's Judas coin. 

"I like you well, aye, better than any man 
who ever walked a bit along life's grey and 
rugged way with me; and you liked me. I 
know it not from any words of yours — for 
speech was not your forte — but oft I caught 
your kindly look and felt the warm, firm clasp 
of your rough, brown hand, and I can hear you 
say, 'Mate, thank Heaven that job's finished; 
let's breathe God's air together.' And we would 
homeward trudge and together rail al the fates 
or gods or systems that held us slaves from 
early morn till all the precious hours of sun- 
shine passed away, turned us out at night, too 
weary and toil-worn to care if God or Devil 
reigned supreme, too bowed with hours of labor 
to see the calm, starlit heavens or feel the 
soothing influence of the sailing moon, or the 
mystery of the rising Thames. 

"Then we would pass, with other workers, to 
our two or three-roomed tenements in a narrow 



street, where children played, pretending that 
stones were luscious fruits, that dirty straw and 
bits of paper were green grass and lovely flow- 
ers, pretending that the murky pool was the 
glorious sea, the ugly street a stretch of brown 
sea-sands, pretending — your wee lad and my wee 
lass — that sticks floating on the dirty drains 
were ships sailing far away to foreign lands, 
ships that would return some day bearing good 
things and much, much money, so that "fader" 
would not have to toil so hard nor be so weary. 
And we would pause to watch the kids and hear 
them say, 'When we grow big, the wondrous 
things we'll do! Mother will not have to cry 
when rent day comes, nor father get so quiet 
and so thin when work is scarce and the man 
who has the jobs to give turns him away and 
says "No work for you to-day." ' 

Visions of the Past. 

"And we would laugh grimly, and talk of the 
great days when all the workers of the world 
would be in one great Union, when hours would 
be only six each day, and wages double that in 
pounds each week; when all the hateful, ugly 
tenements would be wiped out and lovely villas 
stand amid green lawns, when every house would 
have the cleansing bath, when the body, pure, 
upright, and beautiful with health, and all aglow 
with surging life, would be a fitting temple for 
the soul! 

"And the vision would so enthrall us that all 
the sordid ugliness of our lives would, for a 
little while, completely fade away, and with the 
seeing eye of the awakening soul we would 
catch a glimpse of the great dawn. . . . The 
alley and the ragged children, the nagging, 
weary women, and the sickly, whining babes, 
the hard-faced, toil-worn men, and all the hate- 
fulness of life down Poplar way would be no 
more. We saw the women that we loved walk 
free, with all the loveliness of maidenhood and 
the greater beauty of the moiher; with eyes 
calm and full of tender love; with all the haunt- 
ing fear that now lurks in every worker's eyes 
completely gone. We saw our children dance 
with joy in great green meadows and gather 
flowers to bedeck themselves. We saw them 
brown and sunkissed, with strong limbs and 
bonnie checks where roses played, with laugh- 
ing eyes and voices sweet and clear, ringing 
out across the summer air. We saw the chil- 
dren of our dirty, narrow streets clean and 
sweet and fresh, chasing each other on the long, 
brown sands, watching the great ships pass out 
to sea. We saw ourselves, bowed no longer, 
but free — slaves to no man, working for the 
very joy of it, stretching out with all our soul's 
strength to the great Ideal Manhood with hearts 
surging with love and sympathy to all and 
rything wherein the great infinite spirit — 
Life — has found abode. 

"In a Trench of Blood." 

Rut that was yesterday — yesterday, long gone 
by. To-dav — oh, God! To-day I stand knee 
p in a trench of blood. 'Your King and 
Country need you.' They blazoned it abroad, 
and other men were going, and work was slack 
and there was little food, and weary hours of 



trudging round for jobs that were so few got 
on my nerves, and Belgian babes and women 
had been murdered by the German hordes — so 
the man told us at the meeting in the street. 
And so I joined, knowing how to use a gun 
and ride a horse — I had roughed it out west in 
my younger days. They sent me to the 
trenches. 

"You, too, have gone for Kaiser and for coun- 
try to give your life to keep your dear Father- 
land from the Russian hordes. They told you 
so I know, and you believed — and I believed. 
And to-day I try to hate you as my enemy, but 
find I cannot. I stand knee deep in blood and 
mire, the shells fall fast and hundreds of your 
countrymen and mine are hurled into the great 
Eternal Silence, or worse — lying (with bodies 
mangled, limbs torn, or eyes that will not see 
again) in agony for days and nights till Fate 
decide if life or death shall win. 

"I peer into the driving rain— to-day — and try 
to see my enemy. I wonder where you are, old 
mate? And thoughts of love — not hate — sweep 
over me. 'Love your enemies,' said the Great 
Brother, 'forgive him seventy times seven.' Dear 
God, are we all mad or brutes that we should 
lend ourselves to this most awful butchering of 
men? This murdering, by agony, of the women 
robbed of men they love. Oh, God, the desola- 
tion of the children crying in the night and in 
the day for daddy, the aching, torturing loneli- 
ness of those at home! The horror and the 
loathing of the men who, never knowing lust 
o f blood nor murderous hate, have to plunge 
the bayonet deep into a brother's quivering 
flesh! 

Those "Glorious Charges." 

"To-day, they tell us there will be a glorious 
bayonet charge — shall I be rendered so much 
brute, so little man, that I will do this ghastly 
work without becoming mad? Dear God, grant 
that I may not see the eyes of him in whose 
poor body the bayonet plunges. Oh, mate, who 
used to work with me, 1 wonder where you arc 
to-day? No length of years, no penitence, could 
ever give me peace again if, rushing forward 
and plunging deep the bayonet, I found your 
patient, tired eyes gazing into mine. 

"You a Saxon and 1 am Anglo-Saxon. Two 
poor workers toiling all our days for bread 
enough to keep life in, yet caring little if life 
went out. We had no country! 'Keep off the 
grass,' was the sign on everything we needed 
or desired; our enemy w-as the man or system 
that had the power to starve us out unless we 
slaved our lives away. \nd yet tO-day the work- 
ers of the world unite in wholesale massacre 
of men' Peace and love and brotherhood 
million marching men have trampled underf 
'I lie bleeding side, pierced hands and feet, and 
love crucified! And for the why and when I 

of this madness of the world dig deep and find 
the roots greed, ambition, and fear. God for- 
ns, we know nol what we do! 

"T( ih I ill the dead men shall he 

hidden From the sight of mortals, when the tears 
-hall be dry o noiu eyes, though the heart may 
si ill weep To-morrow — when the shrieking of 
terror shall be silenced forever, when the earth 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



shall be dry on our eyes, though the heart may 
when the sea shall have drawn to her deep heart 
the merry lads that all suddenly were turned to 
desperate men, when the cry of drowning men 
has passed, when the silence of death falls on 
the field o' nights and on the black waters. 
To-morrow — when the wise men shall say, 'Let 
there be peace,' when a million men or so have 
laid down their lives, a million women desolate 
and hungry for the love of some dear boy, some 
well-loved man, and millions more — the little 
children — not understanding quite but full of 
vague fear and great loneliness, hearing and see- 
ing strange terrors in the night. . . . 

"To-morrow — when all these things shall have 
come to pass, the Still Small Voice shall be 
heard again. Out of the mire of blood shall the 
banner be lifted! Tremblingly, falteringly, with 
many tears of sorrow and remorse, across the 
gulf we'll stretch our hands, and some day in 
Trafalgar Square we'll sing again the 'Interna- 
tional.' " 



THE IMPENDING CONFLICT. 
(By Scott Nearing.) 



The student will search in vain through 
the annals of economic history for a situa- 
tion more fraught with destructive possibili- 
ties than that now confronting the American 
people. The recipients of property income 
(derived from property ownership) and of 
service income ( paid for the expenditure of 
effort i face each other and prepare for the 
conflict. Those who have put forth the effort 
declare their right to the product of that 
effort. Those who own property hold fast 
to their property and to the prerogatives 
which are inseparable from it. 

Law. custom and business practice have 
made property income a first charge on in- 
dustry. There can be no considerable read- 
justment of income values until the pre- 
eminent position of property is overbal- 
anced by some social action. 

The present tendency should greatly in- 
crease- the total amount of property income 
and the proportion of property income paid 
with each passing decade. Land values 
should continue to rise as population grows 
denser, demand for land increases, and meth- 
ods of using lands are- perfected. The re- 
turns to capital (the interest rate) show 
every indication of advancing. It certainly 
will not decrease' in the near future. 

Meanwhile the immortalization of capital 
proceeds apace. The day when capital could 
be easily dissipated has passed away. Ac- 
counting systems, insurance devices, deprecia- 
tion funds, hoards of directors and trustee- 
ships conserve capital, reduce risks, distribute 
dangers, and in general provide against mis- 
adventures for which interest, at least in 
part, is supposed to be a recompense. When 
once created capital does not disappear. In- 
stead, every conceivable method has been de- 
vised to perpetuate it. It may even add to 
itself, as it frequently docs, when earnings, 
instead of being used for the payment of 
dividends, are- reinvested and turned directly 
into new capital. 

The workers, meanwhile, arc living, for 
the most part, a hand-to-mouth existence, 
successful if they are able to maintain health 
and keep up appearances. Against the value 
of the products which their energy creates 
is charged the property incomes for which 
the labor of some one must pay. To-day the 
producers of wealth are saddled with an 
enormous property income charge, which in- 
creases with each passing year — increases far 
faster than the increase in the population — 
and which, from its very nature, can not be 
reduced, but must be constantly augmented. 

Were there no protest from the producers 
of wealth, the future for capital would in- 
deed be a bright one. With increasing 
stability, increasing safety, decreasing risks, 
an increasing interest rate, and increasing 



land values, the property owners might 
fa< e a future of unalloyed hopefulness. 

Fortunately, no such situation exists. I Irj 
the contrary, there is every indication that, 
with the passing years, the producers of 
wealth will file a protest of ever increasing 
volume against an economic system which 
automatically gives to those who already 
have. 

While the spirit of protest grows in in- 
tensity-, the form remains a matter which 
future years alone may determine. An 
appeal to the available facts leads to the 
conclusion that the most effective protest 
the producers can make will be based on 
a clear recognition of the distinction be- 
tween service income and property income. 
Shall the economic world decide that only 
who expend effort shall share in the 
wealth which is the result of that effort? 
Shall the economic world decide that each 
person expending effort is entitled to all 
the value for which his effort is responsible 
— no more and no less? Shall the eco- 
nomic world set its stamp of approval on 
effort, and its stamp of disapproval on par- 
asitism, by turning the income from ac- 
tivity into the hands of workers, and de- 
nying income to all others? Has the time 
arrived when a few may no longer live in 
idleness upon the products created by those 
who give their lives to labor? Shall not 
the social blessing be bestowed upon those 
who labor and the social curse be hurled 
upon the idler and the wastrel? Lo ! these 
many years has mankind looked forward to 
a day when economic justice could prevail. 
Is not this the day and this new century 
the seed-ground for this new idea? 

Who shall say? Who but those who 
carry the burden of production, and are 
hound by the bonds of economic necessity 
to the tread-mill of toil? 

Could the remainder of the world view- 
life as the worker is forced to view it, 
could the favored few look upon life 
through the same medium of discipline 
and stern necessity which surrounds the 
worker, there would be but one answer. 
Few, indeed, are they who are sincerely 
convinced that justice is fulfilled where the 
many labor and the few enjoy. Few, 
even among that favored few, can face the 
facts unmoved. 

During these dawning years of the twen- 
tieth century, where so many questions 
have been answered, in part, and where- so 
many issues have been raised and laid to 
rest again, men and women innumerable 
in every walk of life have awakened to a 
new realization of the realities of life. 
Great and small, they have been turned 
aside from the false gods of their youthful 
training to a better understanding of their 
obligations to mankind, chief among which 
stands the obligation of creating an eco- 
nomic world in which he who expends ef- 
fort shall be rewarded, while he who is 
unwilling to enter the workshop of life- 
shall receive but the barest subsistence 
which will hold him intact. What other 
message- save this one can the producers 
of wealth dispatch to the recipients of 
property income? The human race must 
finally learn "the immorality and practical 
inexpedience of seeking to acquire wealth 
by winning from another rather than by 
creating it by some sort of service to one's 
fellow men." 



Canned whale meat is now used extensive- 
ly in Japan. 



THE PACIFIC MAIL AGAIN. 



San Francisco's Chamber of Commerce 
should be heartily ashamed of its continued 
mendacity upon the Seamen's Act. 

Certainly there should be enough lover-. 
of the truth in that body to stop its di- 
rectorate from continuing the publication of 
falsehoods which cannot but bring the 
Chamber into disrepute. 

But yet the other day. in a public de- 
nunciation of the Seamen's Act, it again 
printed the deliberate untruth that this 
law had driven the Pacific Mail out of 
business. 

( >n March 14. 1912, R. P. Schwerin, Vice- 
President and General Manager of the 
Pacific Mail Steamship Company, testified 
before the House Committee on Merchant 
Marine and Fisheries : 

"I want to say I am done with the 
American flag forever. I would not raise 
my hand to raise a dollar for the American 
flag. 

"My interest in this business before this 

committee to-day, gentlemen, is absolutely 
because I am practically subpenaed here. 
I have- no interest in the shipping busi- 
ness. I am about to retire." 

And the reason Schwerin was then about 
to retire, and that the Pacific Mail steamers 
were recently sold, was not the Seamen's 
Act — for that was not then born — but the 
Panama Canal Act. 

The- majority of the stock of the Pacific 
Mail Steamship Company was owned by 
the Southern Pacific Railroad Company, 
which fact, under the Panama Canal Act. 
prevented Pacific Mail steamers from pass- 
ing through the canal. 

With the great bulk of the Oriental 
freight diverted from its transcontinental 
trip by rail to San Francisco for reship- 
mc-nt there, to a direct steamer haul from 
the Atlantic Coast through the canal to 
the ( iricnt. the Pacific Mail soon would be 
starving. 

So the- steamers were sold, the demand 
for vessels, right in the face of the passage 
of the Seamen's Act, being so great that 
Schwerin s company received more for the 
ships than they originally cost. 

\nd instead of retiring from the Ameri- 
can flag to that of foreign nations, some 
of those same steamers are now going 
through the Panama Canal, under the same 
old flag, obtaining the profitable business 
denied them while they were part of the 
railroad-owned Pacific Mail Steamship 
Company. — Sacramento Bee. 



ANOTHER RECORD. 



Of late new records have been so fre- 
quently established in our foreign trade 
that what would have formerly appeared 
at the top of the column on the first page 
of your daily paper is now good for only a 
"stick" at the bottom of the last page. 
So you may have missed an announce- 
ment of unusual interest made last week 
by the Bureau of Foreign and Domestic 
Commerce. It was to the effect that for 
the first time in the history of the nation 
exports exceeded three billions in value 
for a twelve months' period. Tn the 
twelve months ended with Aug. 31 last ex- 
ports totaled $3,035,033,280. which com- 
pares with $2,280,185,791 in a like period 
a vcar before. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases! 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER 

Contributed by American Federation of Labor 



Rockefeller Organizes and Finances His 
Own "Labor Union." 

The many tragedies that have been wit- 
nessed in this vSatc during the workers' 
battle for economic justice are now sup- 
planted by comedy — a "Rockefeller union" 
— officered by men approved by the Colo- 
rado Fuel and Iron Company, and financed 
by this same concern. 

With due solemnity the scheme was 
launched in Pueblo, Colo., October 8, and 
is the culmination of a spectacular visit 
through southern Colorado by John D. 
Rockefeller, Jr., and his publicity agent, 
Mackenzie King, accompanied by news- 
paper men and photographers. 

I 'lans for the new "union" were perfected 
at a meeting of officers of the company 
"and 50 representatives of the workers." 
( If course, the "union" was unanimously 
indorsed and mine superintendents were 
given copies of the plan to submit same 
to miners, who have had the scheme ex- 
plained to them by mine officials, after 
which it was indorsed by a "referendum" 
vote. 

Mr. Rockefeller and his friends hail the 
new movement as the final solution of dif- 
ferences between capital and labor. The 
United Mine Workers' Union is not recog- 
nized, but it is hinted, indirectly, that "con- 
ditions may change." This clever appeal 
of the mine operators to be left alone in 
their effort to supplant a trade union will 
not be successful. 

The plan provides that every 150 miners 
shall be entitled to a representative, elected 
by the miners. An elaborate program of 
presenting grievances is included, as is 
committees to increase efficiency and social 
welfare work. 

At the election for representatives, each 
miner "shall be permitted" to freely dis- 
cuss his grievance. Especial attention is 
called to this astounding concession on the 
part of Mr. Rockefeller and his associates, 
who have driven from the southern Colo- 
rado coal fields every worker who protested 
against being forced to patronize company 
stores and who objected to being robbed 
by company check weighmen. 

The company promises to obey all Fed- 
eral and State laws, which is another con- 
cession, as the Colorado Fuel and Iron 
Company's disregard for these statutes 
caused the recent strike of miners. 

Employes "are given the right" to hold 
meetings, and "shall have the right" to em- 
ploy their own check weighmen. The right 
to hire and discharge remains with the 
company, and it is further provided that: 

"There shall be no discrimination by the 
company or by any of its employes on ac- 
count of membership or nonmembership 
in any society, fraternity, or union." 

The effect of this rule on organized labor 
can he best appreciated when it is recalled 
that only recently a special committee, rep 
resulting the United Mine Workers of Amer- 
ica, issued a public statement to John 1). 
Rockefeller, Jr., containing this challenge: 

"Since the strike was called off last Decem- 
ber this company (Colorado Fuel and [ronl 
has steadfastly refused to reemploy nun who 
were still affiliated with the union, and we 
defy Mr. Rockefeller to produce from his en- 



tire working force in southern Colorado a 
dozen men who are members of the union." 

Wages and working conditions are to re- 
main the same until January 1, 1918, but if 
increases are made in competitive districts 
prior to that time a joint meeting of company 
officials and representatives of the men shall 
be called to make effective "proportionate in- 
creases" in the properties of Colorado Fuel 
and Iron. This is another way of saying that 
wages will remain the same until the date 
specified unless the miners' union enforces 
betterments elsewhere. Then it will be neces- 
sary to meet these betterments that the union 
gains no foothold in this section. 

In other words, the backers of the "Rocke- 
tc Her union' announce that working condi- 
tions will be guided by the Mine Workers' 
Union. This declaration is an acknowleil- 
ment that the union is still a force to be 
reckoned with ; that it creates the standard 
for working conditions, and that there is con- 
stant danger that employes may become dis- 
satisfied with the methods of hand-picked 
representatives intended to supplant the right 
of men to elect their own officials and check 
weighmen without supervision by mine su- 
perintendents. 

The entire cost of the plan is to be borne 
by the company. 

The "Rockefeller union" is another link in 
the historic chain of trade union opposition 
that grows weaker and weaker when con- 
fronted by determined agitation and organiza- 
tion by the workers. This opposition was 
first shown when workers were jailed as con- 
spirators if they dared to organize bona fide 
unions. Later, the "open shop" plan was 
favored in the hope that trade unionism 
would be checked. This, likewise, proved in- 
effective and anti-unionists will now prob- 
ably accept the Rockefeller brand of "union- 
ism," which means that an employer will 
"permit" collective bargaining with a union 
he finances and will "permit" presentation of 
grievances through representatives satisfac- 
tory to him. 

This plan, together with increased welfare 
work and clubhouses will, it is expected, keep 
workers from legitimate trade unions, where 
they are taught to own themselves and assert 
their manhood and independence. 



Graduate Students Favor Prof. Nearing. 

Nearly 100 graduate students of the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, many of them in- 
structors at this institution, have signed reso- 
lutions of protest against the dismissal of 
Prof. Nearing, last June. 

It is declared that "freedom of speech of 
our instructors is of first importance," and 
attention is called to the necessity for free- 
dom for research and investigation of every 
subject, "no matter how new or how contrary 
to current preconceptions it may he." 

The resolutions are as follows: 

"We, the undersigned graduate students 
the University of Pennsylvania, wish to 
enter our emphatic protest againsl any ac 
tions of the board of trustees, and of the 
small group in control of the Gen< 
Alumni Society, which infringe upon the 
freedom of thought and expression of our 
instructors. \\ e desire to call attention 
to the fact thai there are in the university 
(Continued on Page 10.) 



MARITIME UNIONS OF THE WORLD. 



International Seamen's Union of America, 570 
West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

[A complete list of unions affiliated with the 
International Seamen's Union of America will 
be found on page 5.] 

AUSTRALASIA. 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia. 

29 Erskine St., Sydney, N. S. W. 

1 Crawford St., Dunedin, N. Z. 

Queens Chambers, Wellington, N. Z. 

Palmerston Bldg., Auckland, N. Z. 

Carrington, Newcastle, N. S. W. 

Maritime Bldg., Melbourne, Victoria. 

Seamen's Offices, Port Adelaide, South Aus- 
tralia. 

26 Edward St., Brisbane, Queensland. 

Dredge Platypus, Cairns, Queensland. 

Wharf Rockhampton, Queensland. 

Ross Island, Townsville, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Maryborough, Queensland. 

Patriot Office, Bundaberg, Queensland. 

Federated Cooks and Stewards' Association of 
New Zealand, Wellington. 

GREAT BRITAIN. 

National Sailors and Firemen's Union, Mari- 
time Hall, West India Dock Roads, Poplar, Lon- 
don, E., England. 

Hull Seamen's and Marine Firemen's Amalga- 
mated Association, 1 Railway St., Hull. 

National Union of Ships' Stewards, Cooks, 
Butchers and Bakers. 4 Spekeland Bldgs., 22 
Canning Place, Liverpool. 

BELGIUM. 

Internationale Zeemansvereeniging, St. Pieters- 
vliet 2. 

GERMANY. 

Deutscher Transportarbeiter Verband, Engcl- 
ufer 21, Berlin S. O. 16, Germany. 
FRANCE. 

Federation National des Syndicats des In- 
scripts Maritimes de France, 33 rue Grange aux- 
Belles, Paris. 

Federation Syndicale des Agents du Service 
General a Bord. 3 Rue Scudery, Havre. 
NORWAY. 

Norsk Matros-og Fyrboder-Union, Skipper- 
gaten 4, Kristiania. 

SWEDEN. 

Svenska-Sjomens-och Eldareforbundct, Stock- 
holm, Tunnelgatan 1 B., Sweden. 

DENMARK. 

Somandenes Forbund, Toldbodgade 15, Koben- 
havn. 

Sofyrbodernes Forbund, St. Annaplads 22, 
Kobenhavn. 

Dansk So-Restaurations Forening, Nyhavn 17, 
Kobenhavn. 

HOLLAND. 

Algemcene Nederlandsche Zeemansbond, Kat- 
tenburgervoorstraat 2, Amsterdam. 

Nederlandsche Zeemansvereeniging "Volhard- 
ing," Veerhaven 14c, Rotterdam. 
ITALY. 
Federazione Nazionale dci Lavoratori del 
Marc, Genova, Piazza S, Marzellino 6-2, Italy. 
AUSTRIA. 
Verband der llandels-Transport, Verkehrsar- 
beiter und Arbeiterinncn Ocsterreichs, Trieste, 
Via Madonnina 15, Austria. 
SPAIN. 
Sociedad Sindicade de Fonda Maritima de 
Cameros y Cocineros y Rcposteros, Calla Mayor 
44, Barcelona. 

URUGUAY. 
Sociedad Carboneros y Marineros, Calle Ingla- 
terra 60, Montevideo. 

ARGENTINA. 
I ederation Obrera .Maritima (Sailors ami Fire- 
men), Buenos Aires, Olavarria 363 (Alto 

BRAZIL. 

Marinheiros e Remandorcs, Rua 
Barao de Sav Felix 1<X, Rio de Jam 

Sociedada Unia dos Foguistas, I ai le Sao 

Domingos 4, Rio de Janeiro. 

Centro Maritimo <los Emp Camara, 

Rua do-. Benedictinos 18, Rio de Janeiiro, 

SOUTH AFRICA. 
Amalgamated Society of South African Sea- 
faring Men and Fishermen, 355 Point Road, 
Durban, Natal. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



World's WorKers. 



The Board of Trade of Great 
Britain is inviting women to register 
themselves at the labor exchanges 
as being ready to do industrial, agri- 
cultural, or clerical work, as the case 
may be. The object aimed at is to 
enable the Government to estimate 
the reserve force of women's labor, 
trained and untrained, available, if it 
should be required. 

Returns relating to unemployment 
in July were received by the Dutch 
ernment Statistical Office from 
trade unions and municipal unemploy- 
ment funds with a total member- 
ship of 100,691. The percentage of 
members out of work during the 
month was 14.3. as compared with 
14.5 in the previous month, and 7.5 
in July, 1914. This percentage is ob- 
tained by taking for each of the 
four for five) weeks in the month 
under consideration the number of 
persons unemployed on one or more 
days of the week. The proportion of 
the average of these four for five") 
numbers to the total membership of 
the funds gives the percent; 

According to the September issue 
of the British Labor Gazette the de- 
mand in August for male labor, both 
of men and boys, continued to be 
greater than the supply, especially in 
those trades engaged in manufactur- 
ing war requirements, with the re- 
sult that there was very little unem- 
ployment. A considerable redistribu- 
tion was going on as between trades 
differently affected by the war, and 
to a growing extent female labor 
continued to supply the deficiency 
created by enlistments. As com- 
pared with August, 1914, when many 
trades were for a sh"rt time dis- 
organized by the outbreak of war. 
employment showed a very marked 
general improvement. 

The British Labor Gazette reports 
the supply of men for ordinary mer- 
cantile ships during August at most 
ports in the United Kingdom was 
just equal to the demand. At Car- 
diff, however, it was said to be 
ample. At London, Southampton, 
Avonmouth and Xeweastle-on-Tvne, 
on the other hand, a shortage was 
reported. There was still a 
shortage also at Sunderland, though 
the supply had improved. At New- 
port the supply fell off towards the 
end of the month. Returns received 
from certain selected ports show 
34,544 seamen shipped on foreign- 
going vessels during August, a 
crease of 7590 on July, and of 12,- 
142 on August, 1914. 

According to data published in the 
September issue of the Bollettino 
dell' Ufficio del Lavoro (the journal 
of the Department of Labor Statis- 
tics of the Italian Ministry of 
culture, Industry and Commerce), 34 
labor disputes took place in Italy 
during July, the number of work- 
people taking part in 33 of these 
being 4815. In the preceding month 
37 disputes were recorded, 5506 work- 
people taking part in 34 of I 
while in July, 1914, 11 dis 
curred, in which 11,100 persons took 
part. The groups of trades most 
seriously affected by the July dis- 
putes were the textile (in which 
2761 workpeople went on strike), the 
metal (804), building (375), mining 
(M}>\ and leather and skins (296), 
these five groups together comprising 
about 96 per cent, of the aggregate 
number of persons directly atl 
The above particulars relate to in- 
dustrial occupation-, exclusive of ag- 
riculture. 



SAN PEDRO, CAL. 



C. B. CANNON 



CANNON a BLAIZE 



A. E. BLAIZE 



Headquarters for 

UNION-MADE CLOTHING FOR SEAFARING MEN 

Special Low Price on 

SEA BOOTS AND OIL CLOTHING 

Men's Suits Made to Order 

515 FRONT-516 BEACON 8TS. .... SAN PEDRO 

"WHEN IT COMES TO GOOD CLOTHES" 

Tailored to FIT YOU, in a UNION SHOP 
It will be to your interest to call on 

S. G. SWANSON 

641 SOUTH BEACON STREET, next door to PostofMce 
Established 1904, at the Los Angeles "Waterfront" SAN PEDRO, CALIFORNIA 



San Pedro News Co. 

Sixth and Beacon Streets, San Pedro, Cal. 

DEALERS IN ALL KINDS OF 

STATIONERY 

Lob Angeles Examiner and All Ban 

Francisco Papers on Sale. Agents 

Harbor Steam Laundry 



^^WV^WWWWt/VWS/S/WWtfWWW^AA 



Mills, Elbert $ Nash 

SIXTH AND BEACON STREETS 

FIFTH AND BEACON STREETS 

— Dealers In — 

EDGEWORTH TOBACCO AND 

UNION LABEL CIGARS 



GIVE US A TRIAL 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

The members of the crew of the 
barkentine "Mary Winkelman" who 
made the voyage in her to Mollendo, 
Peru, and arrived at San Francisco 
on her return trip on April 5, 1914, 
are wanted by the Charles Nelson 
Co., at San Francisco, Cal. — 6-24-14 

John Erik Nordberg, a native of 
Sweden, age about 26, supposed to 
be sailing on the Pacific Coast, is 
inquired for by his brother Harold, 
care of Sailors' Union of the Pa- 
cific, San Francisco. 

Oscar Olsen, age 37, a native of 
Hallerna, near Gothenborg, Sweden, 
who was sailing on the Great Lakes 
about three years ago, is inquired 
for by John V. Olsen, Sun Com- 
pany, Marcus Hook, Pa. 5-26-15 

Adolph Godfred Eriksen, born in 
Moss, Norway, is inquired for by 
his brother, Herman Eriksen. Any 
one knowing his whereabouts please 
notify W. Nielsen, 206 Moravian St., 
Philadelphia, Pa. 5-26-15 



M. BROWN and SONS 

have moved to 

109 SIXTH STREET 

Opposite Sailors' Union Hall 

SAN PEDRO, CAL. 

INFORMATION WANTED. 

Xed Kirchheimer, a native of Ger- 
many, weight about 215 pounds, age 
49, blue eyes and dark curly hair, who 
left his home April 24, 1915, to look 
for work, is inquired for by his wife. 
Anyone knowing the whereabouts of 
the above named, please notify Mrs. 
Elsie Kirchheimer, 712 Rush Ave., 
Houston, Tex. 9-29-15 

Eugene Martin, age 25, 6 feet tall, 
gray eyes, is inquired for by his 
mother. Anyone knowing his where- 
abouts please notify Mrs. Rose T. 
Martin, 4231 15 N. E., Seattle, 
Wash. 1-27-1915 

Vencelus Durbich is inquired for 
by his brother. Anyone knowing his 
whereabouts please communicate with 
Gerolamo Durbich, Zurich, Switzer- 
land. 7-28-15 

Herman Sigfrid Persson, a native 
of Malmo, Sweden, supposed to be 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, who has 
not been heard of for two years, is 
inquired for by his brother, Gustav 
Persson. Address 13 Stenbarksgatan 
Malmo, Sweden. 7-28-15 

Adolf Krakan, last heard of at Port 
Pirie, January 1912, and again in 
March 1913, from Warumbo, 118 
miles from Adelaide, South Australia, 
is inquired for by his mother at 
Hamburg, Germany. — 8-25-15. 



San Pedro Letter List. 



<•^'*^^'^'^^^^»^A^^^^^^>^^v^^»^■^«^■^•^^^AA•^^^^^ a ^■^•**^^»^^^^«^^■l'V^'^■^VV'^vv'Vv , '^^w' , v'vvv'w''V'VV''Vv^^^^ 



A SAILOR'S BANK. 

With Branches Throughout the World 

In the Philippines, Japan, China, Straits Settlements, India, 
London, Mexico and Panama, the 

INTERNATIONAL BANKING CORPORATION 

is particularly well equipped to give service to 

SEA- FARING MEN 

IN THE 

SAVINGS DEPARTMENT 
of its San Francisco Branch 

it gives "Personal Service" and courteous treatment to all its 

customers. Four per cent, per annum is paid on Savings 

Deposits, computed semi-annually. 

In 1910 it purchased and took over the business of the 

SWEDISH AMERICAN BANK 

and for the accommodation of its Scandinavian customers, 
the bank carries on hand at all times an ample supply of 
Swedish, Norwegian and Danish 5Kr. and lOKr. bank notes. 

Sailors' Accounts are Especially Welcomed 

Head Office— 60 Wall Street, New York 

Resources over $40,000,000 

MILLS BUILDING :: BUSH and MONTGOMERY STREETS 

Uptown Branch, Geary and Fillmore Streets 

Open Saturday Evenings, i to f 

E. W. WILSON, Manager 



■ m, Emanuel 
Anderson, Edw. 

-1739 
Anderson, John -1968 
Anderson, Martin 

-1894 
Anderson, Sven. 

(Reg. Letter.) 
Anderson, Oscar 
Anderson. Ernest 
Andersson, Enkan 
Apeluuist, Otto 
Baxter, Arthur 

, Borge 
Buanik, L. 
Brein, Hans 
Bonsen, Ray 
Bergman, Leo 
Benrowitz, Felix 
Carera, Pete 
Dahlgren, Pete 
■William 
Duval, William 
Ericsson, Otto 
Kklund, Sven 
Fisher, Wm. 
! [ansen, Oskar 
Hansen, Charly 
Hansen, M. 
Hansen, Hilmar 
Hecker, William 
Hannus, Alex. 
Jensen. H. -1555 

tisson, Victor 
Johanson, T. 
Jacobs, August 
Johansson, Geo. W. 

-1219 
Johanson, Geo. 
Johnson. Edvard A. 
.Tohansen. Chas. 
Johnson. Herman 
Johansson, John A. 

-1659 
Johnson, Gus. 
Johnson, K. H. 
Kulnin, Ed. 



Lindebors. Ernst 
Latz, Konstant 
Lundstedt, Chris. 
Lutzen, Valdemar 
Lalan, Joe 
Lindsberg, C. 
Larsen, L. K. 
Lindholm. A. 
Matson, Johan 
Mikalsen. Andreas 
Malm, Gustaf 
McGuire, J. 
Mesak, K. 
Martinson, P. A. 
Nyhagen. Julius 
Xohr, Niels 
Olsen, John 
Olsen, Ludvlg 
Olsen, Olaf 
Owen, Fred 
Ophaug. Wllhelm 
Olin, Emil 
Penningrud, Ludvik 
Peterson. Hans. 

-1064 
Peterson, N. 
Peterson, Otto 
Poscet, P. 
Philips, Charley 
Richardson, A. 
Parsons. Olaf 
Rogis, A. 
Renvall, Anshelm 
Smith, Lawrence 
Sutse, Michael 
Sanders, Charles 
Stromsberg, Ivar 
Sevenson, Paul z 
Sievers, G. P. 
Tamisar, P. 
Toren, Gustaf A. 
T'hlig. Richard 
Verney. M. O. 
Verdonk. Peter 
Warkkala, John 
Packages. 
Johnson, K. H. 



Honolulu, H. T. 

Anderson, John B. Nelsen. C. F. 

Burk, Harry -1284 Petersen. Carl 

Crantly, C. W. Peters, Walter 

Eugenlo, John Relther, Fritz 

Ekelund, Rickhard Solberg, B. P. 

Ivertsen, Slgvald B. Strand, Conrad 

Lengwenus, W. L. Thompson, Emll N. 
Moller. F. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Daniel William Thorin is inquired 
for by his mother. Anyone knowing 
his whereabouts please notify Fru 
Thorin, Hegagata 7, Gothenborg, 
Sweden. 9-23-14 

Carl Fritjof Johansson Lind, age 
39, a native of Sonderborg, Germany, 
sailing on the Pacific Coast, is in- 
quired for by his brother. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify John Lind, 1401 West 9th St., 
Cleveland, Ohio.— 3-24-15. 

Frederick Wood, a seaman, sailing 
on the Pacific Coast, is inquired for 
by his sister, Miss Lucy Wood, 10t> 
Broughan street, Darlinghurst, Syd- 
ney, N. S. W., Australia. He is de- 
scribed to be tall, with dark curly 
hair and carries a scar on the nose. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
kindly notify the office of Chief of 
Police, San Francisco, Cal. — 6-24-14. 

Waldemar Stintman, alias Broth, 
a native of Russia, age 21, supposed 
to be sailing on the Pacific Coast. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify his brother, John Stint- 
man, address Sailors' Union of the 
Pacific, San Francisco. 

Anyone knowing the whereabouts 
of Magnus Magnussen, a native of 
Soderhamn, Sweden, should at once 
communicate with F. A. Smith, Box 
770, Aberdeen, Wash. 9-23-14 

Martin Nielsen, a native of Den- 
mark, member of the Sailors' Union 
on the Pacific for the last 8 years, 
has not been heard of since July, 
1912. His address then was Sailors' 
Union, Seattle, Wash. Any one 
knowing his whereabouts please no- 
tify George Leonhard, Sailors' Union, 
59 Clay St.— 8-11-1915. 

Olai Ingebrigtsen (Brock), a na- 
tive of Norway, last heard from 13 
years ago, when leaving San Fran- 
cisco for Australia on the American 
bark "Golden Gate," is inquired for 
by his brother. Any information re- 
garding the above named will be 
gladly received by Niels Ingebrigtsen, 
469 — 49th street, Brooklyn, N. Y.; or 
Sam Andersen, 100 Steuart street, San 
Francisco, Cal. — 8-4-15. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Pacific Coast Marine. 



Edward White of Watsonville, Cal., lias been 
appointed Commissioner of Immigration at San 
Francisco. 

The schooner "Hugh Hogan" has been sold 
by H. P. Dutton to Knaflich & Shields. The 
vessel is now being overhauled. She is of 355 
tons register, and was built in 1904. 

The California South Sea Navigation Com- 
pany has been awarded the contract to carry 
the United States mails between San Francisco 
to Mexico as far south as Acapulco. 

The Lauritzen Transportation Company. 
Antioch, has purchased the Jarvis shipyards. 
C. A. Lauritzen, one of the owners, said that 
two new cement ways would be installed im- 
mediately. 

At the annual meeting of the Ship Owners' 
Association of the Pacific Coast held at San 
Francisco during the past week the following 
officers were elected: Oliver J. Olson, presi- 
dent; George Beadle, vice-president, and W. L. 
Sullivan, treasurer. 

There is a possibility that the Navv Depart- 
ment may alter their decision to sell the "Rain- 
bow" and instead of condemning her to the 
scrap heap she may be repaired at the Mare 
Island Navy Yard for service as a receiving 
ship. 

After seven months' trading, whaling and 
walrus hunting cruise, which carried her along 
the Siberian coast far into the Arctic and to 
Nome, the steam whaler "Belvedere," Captain 
A. P. Jochimsen, reached Seattle on October 
14 with a cargo of furs, walrus, hides, ivory and 
whale oil. 

According to reports from the north the 
steamer "Breakwater," which has been operated 
between Columbia River and Coos Bay ports 
for several years, is to be brought to San Fran- 
cisco to be sold. The steamer has been oper- 
ated by the Southern Pacific in transferring 
passengers and freight. 

- After operating a wharf at Valdez. Alaska, 
for thirteen years, James A. Lathrop has been 
called upon to explain to Major J. B. Cava- 
naugh. Corps of Engineers, U. S. Army, that 
he is not an obstructionist to navigation. Com- 
plaint against Lathrop was filed with the War 
Department by the Valdez City Council. 

Advices received by the marine department of 
the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce report 
the abandoning of the barge "Washington" off 
Cape St. Elias October 11 while en route from 
Port Blakelev to Cordova with a lumber cargo. 
The tug "Pioneer" cast the barge adrift in a 
sinking condition and then made her way to 
Cordo\ a. 

The "Star of Holland," one of the crack ships 
of the Alaska Packers fleet, left San Francisco 
during the week for Port Townsend, where 
lumber will be taken on for Australia. High 
charter rates now prevailing in the lumber and 
grain trade will probably result in other of 
these former clipper ships going into the lumber- 
carrying business during the winter months. 

Agents of the Pacific Coast Company con- 
tinue to deny absolutely the rumors to the effect 
that it has disposed of five of its steamers to 
the Ward line. These rumors seem to have 
emanated from the fact that this company's 
steamers would undoubtedly bring a good figure 
did the Pacific Coast Steamship Companv care 
to sell, with the additional inducement that 
at present a purchaser would not be hard to 
find. 

A marked increase in the demand for Ha- 
waiian-grown bananas along the Pacific Coast 
and as far cast as Chicago has awakened a 
new industry, in which growers in the islands 
are reaping a substantial profit. The Matson 
steamers "Lurline" and "Manoa" are especially 
equipped to handle large consignments of 
bananas between the islands and the Coast. The 
Bluefields banana is now one of the most suc- 
cessfully grown varieties in the islands. 

Another new vessel in the Matson fleet, to 
cost over $1,000,000 and to be in service by the 
middle of 1917 between San Francisco and 
Honolulu, is the plan of Captain William Mat- 
son, who recently signed a contract with the 
Union Iron Works for the construction. This 
will be the first of the Matson steamers to be 
built on this Coast, as the other vessels were all 
constructed on the east coast and brought here 
via the Straits of Magellan. Whether the new 
steamer shall be a sister ship of the bier flagship 
"Matsonia" or of the slightly smaller liner 
"Manoa" has not been decided bv the head of 
the Matson Company. This point will be de- 
cided shortly and work on the new ship will 
begin at once. 

Smugeling opium was done in a new manner 
bv T.. F. McDougall. electrician of the Pacific 
Mail liner "Manchuria," which arrived home 
from the Orient during the week, according to 
reports from Manila. According to the story 
told in the Manila News, McDougall was in- 
duced by Chinese members of the "Manchuria" 
crew to buy an automobile here. While the 
motor was in the hold of the vessel the Chinese 
filled the tires with $37,500 worth of prepared 
onium and the machine was run ashore in Ma- 
nila as if it had real air in its tires. News was 
carried to the Manila secret service, however, 



and shortly after the machine was taken ashore 
the sleuths came down upon it and found the 
contraband drug. 

Further conservation of oil fields in Cali- 
fornia and possibly in Oklahoma is contemplated 
in Secretary Daniels' plans for the Navy, in 
connection with strengthening national defense. 
Navy officers and officials of the Department 
of Justice and General Land Office are studying 
the situation in California, where recent court 
decisions have helped Navy projects. The Navy 
Department wants to reserve for future use 
surveyed and proved oil lands, storing the 
emergency supplies in the ground until needed. 
In the Oklahoma field the Interior Department 
cannot by law lease wells on the Osage Reser- 
vation except on public bids. It is possible that 
legislation will be sought to make the Navy 
Department a preferred bidder. 

The Japanese Government has, it is reported, 
granted permission to Japanese steamship lines 
to raise freight rates on cotton from 40 cents 
per picul, which is 30 cents per 100 pounds, to 
50 cents per picul, from all Pacific ports in the 
United States to transpacific ports. While the 
increase is temporary, it seems likely that it 
will prevail during the present season at any 
rate. As against this raise of rates on Japa- 
nese lines, news of which comes in a recent 
report from Consul General Scidmore, at Yoko- 
hama, that tramp steamers are showing up there 
and at all Pacific ports in increasing numbers. 
The Puget Sound fleet shows no loss of tonnage 
over last year, and there are five steamship lines 
operating between Puget Sound and Oriental 
European and Atlantic seabord points. 

The China Mail Steamship Company, an or- 
ganization financed entirely by Chinese in this 
country and in southern China, has purchased 
from the Atlantic Transport Company of West 
Virginia the steamship "China," recently one of 
the Pacific Mail's Oriental fleet. The considera- 
tion is not stated. Look Tin Eli, president of 
the Canton Bank of San Francisco, is one of 
the principal bankers of the enterprise, other 
capital having been furnished, it is said, by 
Chinese in this and other of the Pacific Coast 
cities and by wealthy merchants of Hongkong 
and Canton. It is stated as the intention of the 
company to add other steamships to its fleet as 
rapidly as possible, establishing thereby an 
extensive service between San Francisco, Hono- 
lulu, Nagasaki, Manila and Hongkong. 

Fast fruit steamers, similar to those in service 
between the West Indies and North Atlantic 
coast ports, may be placed in service between 
San Francisco and New York, via the canal. A 
representative of the Panama-Pacific line, in a 
conference with Sacramento fruit shippers, de- 
clared the company would make arrangements 
to transport the valley output to the east coast 
in steamers equipped with refrigerating appara- 
tus, if the traffic warranted the expense. That 
the steamship lines operating from San Fran- 
cisco to the east coast are soliciting for the 
fruit transportation business is indicated by the 
fact that special rates, much below railroad 
rates, were offered to the California Fruit Dis- 
tributors by a representative of one of the 
steamship companies. 

"Hard luck" has followed the lumber schooner 
"Weatherwax" since she left Victoria some five 
months ago. The "Weatherwax" went out of 
Victoria bound for Sidney, N.S.W., with a cargo 
of 465,382 feet of fir and arrived in Honolulu 
June 24th leaking badly. At the island port 
she was recalked and new yards supplied, and 
fifty-four days later started for Australia. Head 
winds and calms were her fate all the way and 
then a storm near the Equator opened her 
seams again, so that 60,000 feet of her deck 
cargo was jettisoned to save the craft, which 
put back for Honolulu for the second time. The 
"Weatherwax" was laid up in Seattle for three 
years before starting on the present voyage, 
and, according to her crew, was not in shape to 
make such a trip. 

Two steamers, one built at the Union Iron 
Works and one which has been overhauled ex- 
tensively there, were sold during the week at 
San Francisco, marking the largest deals in local 
shipping sales for many months. The "Eurania," 
sister ship of the "Annette Rolph," launched 
September 11th, was sold to a New York buyer, 
and the steamer "Kansas City" was bought by 
another Eastern shipping man. Terms on both 
sales were private. The "Kurania" i> a 9000-ton 
freighter and was built along with her sister 
ship, which was constructed for Mayor Rolph. 
•Each cost over $600,000 to build. Alter being 
extensively overhauled, the "Kansas City," which 
is one of the fastest steamers on the Coast, was 
sold to enter the east coast trade. for several 
years along with the "Rose City" this vessel was 
on the run between San Francisco and Portland, 
and later on the Panama run of the Pacific 
Mail. 



F. R. WALL, who was for many years an 
officer in the United States Navy, is now prac- 
ticing marine law in San Francisco. He gives 
claims of all seafarers careful attention. 324 
Merchants' Exchange Bldg., Third Floor. Cali- 
fornia St., near Montgomcrv. Telephone Kearnv 
394. (Advt.) 



International Seamen's Union 
of America 

Affiliated with 

AMERICAN FEDERATION OF LABOR 

and 

INTERNATIONAL TRANSPORT WORKERS' 

FEDERATION. 

THOS. A. HANSON, Secretary, 

570 West Lake St., Chicago, 111. 

AFFILIATED UNIONS. 

ATLANTIC DISTRICT. 



EASTERN AND GULF SAILORS' ASSOCIATION. 

Headquarters: 
BOSTON, Mass, 1%A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway St 
NEW YORK CITY, 51 South St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St 
NORFOLK, Va., 41 Loyalls Lane. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 South Commerce St 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 12 South St. Telephone 2107 

Broad. Night Call 2108 Spring. 
New York Branch, 400 West St. Telephone 5153 
Chelsea. 

Branches: 
BOSTON, Mass., 258 Commercial St 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 117 Decatur St 
BALTIMORE, Md., 806 South Broadway. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 206 Moravian St 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 
ERS OF THE ATLANTIC AND GULF. 
Headquarters (temporary): 
BOSTON, Mass, iy 2 A Lewis St. 

Branches: 
PHILADELPHIA, Pa., 129 Walnut St. 
NEW YORK, 51 South St. and 280 West St 
BALTIMORE, Md., 802-804 South Broadway 
NORFOLK, Va., 41 Loyalls Lane. 
NEW ORLEANS, La., 206 Julia St. 
MOBILE, Ala., 104 S. Commerce St. 



HARBOR BOATMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
NEW YORK CITY, 190 West St. Phone 4126 Worth. 



LAKES DISTRICT. 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
CHICAGO, 111., 570 West Lake St. 

Branches: 
BUFFALO, N. Y., 55 Main St. 
ASHTABULA HARBOR, O., 21 High St. 
CLEVELAND, O., 1401 W. 9th St. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 133 Clinton St. 
N. TONAWANDA, N. Y., 152 Main St. 
CONNEAUT HARBOR, O., 992 Day St. 
ERIE, Pa., 107 E. Third St. 
DETROIT, Mich., 15 Twelfth St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1721 N. Third St. 
BAY CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
SOUTH CHICAGO, 111., 9142 Mackinaw Ave. 
PORT HURON, Mich., 517 Water St. 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATERTEND- 

ERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION OF 

THE GREAT LAKES. 

Headquarters: 

BUFFALO, N. Y., 71 Main St. 

Branches: 
CLEVELAND, O., 1185 W. Eleventh St. 
CHICAGO, 111., 445 La Salle Ave. 
DETROIT, Mich., 27 Jefferson Ave. 
MILWAUKEE, Wis., 151 Reed St. 
SUPERIOR, Wis., 1814 Fourth St. 
OGDENSBURG, N. Y., 70 Isabella St. 
BAT CITY, Mich., 108 Fifth Ave. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION OF 
THE GREAT LAKES. 
HEADQUARTERS: 
406 N. Clark St., Chicago, III. 
Telephone Main 365. 
BRANCHES: 
Buffalo, N. Y. Toledo, O. 

Cleveland, O. North Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Milwaukee, Wis. Superior, Wis. 

Ashtabula, O. Erie, Pa. 



PACIFIC DISTRICT. 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 59 Clay St. 

Branches: 
VANCOUVER, B. C. 213 Hasting St., E. corner of 
Hasting and Main, P. O. Box 1365, Tel. Seymour 8703. 
TACOMA, Wash., 2218 North 30th St. 
SEATTLE), Wash., 84 Seneca St., P. O. Box 65. 

i.i IRDEBN, Wash., P. O. Box 6. 
PORTLAND, Ore., 44 Union Ave., North. 
El REKA, Cal., 227 First St., P. O. Box 64. 
SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 67. 
HONOLULU, M. T., Cor. Queen and Nunanu SU., 
P O. Rnx 314. 

(Continued on Page 11.) 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Coast Seamen's Journal 

PUBLISHED WEEKLY AT SAN FRANCISCO 
BY THE 

SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC 

Established in 1887 



PAUL SCHARRBNBBRG Editor 

'• M- HOLT Manager 

TERMS IN ADVANCE. 

ear, by mail - $2.00 ! Six months - - - Jl.on 
Advertlsini on Applical 



ges in advertisements must be in b 
each week. 



lo Insure a prompt reply, correspondents 

ill cot i Lions of a business nature to the 

tger. 



red at the San Francisco Postofflce as 
ma tter. 



f i he Sailoi - I I in of the Pacific. 
59 Clay Street, San Francisco. 



[CE TO CORRESPONDENTS. 

Communications from seafaring readers will be 
tied In the JOURNA1 
eral interest, brii e, written on one side only 

and address. The JOURNAL Is nol responsibl 

pressions of eoi or for the return 

of manuscript. 



WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 20, 1915. 



SEAMEN— ATTENTION. 



Application blanks for Able Seaman Certifi- 
cates are now available at the respective offices 
of the Sailors' Union of the Pacific. 

Be sure to secure a copy of these Application 
blanks at once; have it properly filled in and 
sworn to, and be prepared to file the affidavit 
with local inspectors as soon as the latter are 
authorized to issue Able Seaman Certificates. 

The Secretary and all other employes of the 
Union will gladly aid and advise with all seamen 
who desire assistance in filling the Application 
blanks. 

Do it now! 

Remember, the new law will be in full force 
and effect fifteen days from date on all Amer- 
ican ships of ICO tons gross and upward. 



WHY THIS DELAY? 



The new Seamen's Act will go into effect 
on Thursday, November 4 (fifteen days from 
date of this issue I. 

Vmong other things the new law provides 

n and after November 4, "no ves 

one hundred gross tons and upward, shall be 

permitted to leave a port of the United States, 

. unless flirty per cent, of her deck 

crew, exclusive of licensed officers and ap 

prentices, are of a rating not less than able 
seaman." 

The law states specifically who shall be 
rated as an "able seaman" and directs the 
Secretary of Commerce to issue rules gov- 
erning the issuance of able seaman certificates. 
To quote from Section 13 : 

Every person shall be rated an able seaman, 
and qualified for si h on the seas, 

of age or upward, and 
has had at least three years' servi 
sea or on tl i a ^ essel 

tu which this 'lilies, including decked 

fishing vessels, naval vessels i d ves- 

i ml i \ erj | hall be rated an abl 

man, and qualified to serve as such on the Great 
and on the small or sounds, 

who is nineteen years of age or upward, and has 
had at least eighteen months' service oi 
at sea or on the Great Lakes or on the smaller 



lakes, bays or sounds, on a vessel or vess 
i this section applies, including decked 
ing vessels, naval vessels, or coast guard vessels. 

Then follows a modification of the three- 
year service rule, as follows: 

[ naiis of school ships approved by and 
conducted under rules prescribed by the Secre- 
tary of t be rated able seamen 
nonths' service at sea; provided, 
under rules prescribed by 
the Department of Commerce as to eyesight, 
hearing, and physical condition, such persons or 
graduates ai e Fi >und impetent. 

And finally, there is another exemption For 

"competent" men of only one year's service. 

as follows: 

That upon examination, under rules prescribed 
partment of Commerce as to eyesight, 
liearin al condition, and knowledge of 

the duties unship, a person found 

petent may be rated as able seaman after having 
I i>n deck twelve months at sea, or on the 
Great Lakes; but seamen examined and rated 
eamen under this proviso shall not in any 
case compose more than one-fourth of the num- 
ber of abb , required by this section to 
be shipped or i i upon any vessel. 

In accordance with the law, the Depart- 
ment o erce has issued rules governing 
the examination of men with only one 
service. But the Department has issued no 
rubs or regulations upon the issuance of able 
seaman certificates to men who have had 
three years' service. That it will he impos- 
sible to issue the thousands upon thousands 
of three years' service certificates in one or 
two days seems absolutely certain. Notwith- 
standing this obvious fact, certificates are not 
yel being issued, although only two weeks re- 
main until the law takes effect. 

Enquiry at the office of the local inspec- 
tor brought forth the information that no 
able seaman certificates had been issued and 
none would be issued until directions were 
received from Washington. When the ques- 
tion was asked how soon such directions were 
ted, the inspector curtly informed the 
applicant that he was going "a little too far 
in his questioning" and suggested to the 
seeker of information that he "had better 
write to Washington himself." 

Inasmuch as previous inquiry of Mr. Geo. 
I'hler, the chief of the Steamboat Inspection 
Service, brought forth no mure definite infor- 
mation than is obtainable locally, we have 
reluctantly come to the conclusion that those 
entrusted with working out the details of 
this particular feature in the law believe in 
keeping their own counsel and do not pro- 
pose t'i be "rushed" ! 

it be true that -Air. I'hler is deliber- 
ately attempting to make the proper enforce- 
ment of the law absolutely impossible when 
it takes effect two weeks hence? 

Is he, by his refusal to issue the able sea- 
man certificates, trying to make it appear that 
a sufficient number of competent seamen are 
not obtainable in ports of the United Si 

Does Mr. Redfield, the Secretary of ' 
. realize that the peculiar dilatory tac- 

if his subordinates are bmind to cause a 

general mix-up and possibly a tie-up of ship- 
ping on November 4? 



( Ine nf the "features" in the agreement 
arrived at between the Rockefeller coal 
miners' union and the Rockefeller coal 
mining company is the declaration that 
"the company agrees to abide hereafter" 

by the mining and labor laws of Colorado. 

Such magnanimity is indeed touching. Of 

many "concessions" voluntarily made 

b\ Mr. Rockefeller, this one is really al 

1 to be true. Think of it. 

Brethren, Rockefeller has "voluntarily" 

I in "hereafter" abide by the law. 

Goodness gracious, call the police! 



\'< >TE FOR NON-PARTISANSHIP. 



I bi Tuesday of next week the citizens of 
< alifornia will vote upon the question of es- 
tablishing non-partisanship in the election of 
State officials, such as Governor, Lieutenant- 
Governor, members of the State Legislature, 
etc. 

The California State Federation of Labor 
has gone on record in favor of this law be- 
cause organized labor has for years con- 
ducted its legislative battles along non-parti 
sail lines. 

Partisanship in California labor legisla- 
tion has long ago ceased to be a factor in se- 
curing results. Labor in California has had 
loyal friends and stanch supporters in all par- 
ties. 

And it is nf the deepest significance that 
Labor's most uncompromising enemies in all 
parties are the principal opponents of the 
non-partisan law. Such notorious reaction- 
aries as ex-Governor Gillett, State Senator 
Curtin and men nf similar type are Stumping 
the State tn uphold the political parties which 

made possible their elevation to public office 
and which alone enabled them to pose as 
( standpat i statesmen. 

Messrs. Otis, De Young, and in addition. 
practically every self-constituted journalistic 
friend of the common people is vociferously 
shouting I'm- the retention of the old system. 

It should be noted that the proposed non- 
partisan law will not change the present meth- 
od nf nominating and electing United States 
Senators, Representatives in Congress, Presi 
dential electors, party committeemen, and 
delegates to the National party conventions. 
All these offices have to do with National 
affairs and will remain partisan. 

The establishment of non-partisanship in 
Stale elections is conceded to be one of the 
most important questions any American State 
will face this year. It is a question which all 
Californians should vote upon. The election 
is Tuesday, October 26. No Californian 
should, on that day, remain away from the 
polls. Those who favor the plan of electing 
on non-partisan basis, members of the State 
I the eleven State and district 
officials, who are still elected as partisans, 
will vote "Yes" mi Number 1 and Number 
_' mi the ballot. 



AN OBITUARY. 



That branch of the would-be world saviors 

known as the "Detroit I. W. \Y." has adopted 

a new name. The official "reason" given for 

fiange is edifying and worthy of note. 

'I'n quotl from the "Weekly People" of 

New York: 

The reason for the changing of the name 
Industrial Workers of the World to Work- 
ers' International Industrial Union is that the 
pernicious Anarchistic activities of the llaywood- 
Flynn organization "i Chicago which calls itself 
I. W. W., featured and cub. red by the capitalist 
have caused the name [. \V. W. to stand 
fur \ i. murder, destruction, and 

genera] slum tactics alien tu true industrial un- 
ionism and foreign to a real working class or- 
ganization. It was also declared in the conven- 
tion that the da carried on by the 
it I. W. W. under that name had given the 
Chicago Bummery crowd a standing they would 
otherwise be without. 

Mow these two groups ,,\ "fellow workers" 
love each other! 

I low they vie with each other in endeavor- 
ing tn establish the "one big union"! 

Farewell, you 1. W. W.! 

Hail the W. I. 1. Ul 
od-night ! 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



THE PANAMA CANAL. 



It certainly does appear as if the worst 
predictions, made prior to the opening of the 
Panama Canal, regarding the danger of 
blockade through slides have now been real- 
ized. 

While the first year of the Canal's opera- 
tion closed without serious blockades the 
second year does not give promise of a like 
performance. 

The recent unprecedented slides are all the 
more to be deplored when we consider that 
each succeeding month had marked the set- 
ting of a new record for the volume of 
traffic passing through the Canal. 

The number of ocean-going vessels making 
the passage in July was 170, about 65 per 
cent, greater than the average for the pre- 
ceding months since the Canal was opened 
to commercial traffic. The cargo carried 
through the Canal during the month 
amounted to 705,469 tons and exceeded the 
shipments in any previous month. 

A comparison of the traffic in both direc- 
tions shows : 

-Westbound- -Eastbound- Total 

Ves- Cargo, Ves- Cargo, Ves- Cargo, 

Month. sels. Tons. sels. Tons. sels. Tons. 

August .... 11 62,178 13 49,106 24 111,284 

September . 30 180,276 27 141,762 57 322,038 

October .... 40 253,288 44 168,069 84 421,357 

November . 38 242,291 54 206,510 92 448,801 

December .. 57 271,219 43 179,235 100 450,454 

January ... 54 240,925 44 208,082 98 449,007 

February .. 53 276,078 39 150,987 92 427,065 

March 80 417,610 57 217,447 137 635,057 

April 60 285,457 59 237,384 119 522,841 

Mav 75 332,174 67 246,534 142 578,708 

June 60 282,561 83 320,619 143 603,180 

July 93 316,773 77 388,696 170 705,469 

Total ....651 3,160,830 607 2,514,431 1,258 5,675,261 

The aggregate tonnage passing through the 
Canal in the 11^ months was 5,675,261 tons 
or an average of 493,935 tons per month. 
Seventy-six British vessels went through the 
Canal in July, against only fifty-five American 
ships, the two countries contributing the 
greater part of the total. No other country 
was represented to the extent of more than 
eight vessels. 



A scarehead announcement in Willie 
Hearst's local organ informs the world that 
the United States Navy is short 18,000 men. 
Willie says we must have those men ; the wel- 
fare of our country demands it ; patriotism 
requires it, etc. Yet, this same patriot insists 
that Mr. Schwerin and Mr. Dollar be per- 
mitted to make American ships the exclusive 
training ground for Orientals. Willie thinks 
Chinese coolies are good enough to man the 
American Merchant Marine — at any rate, he 
has demonstrated to his own satisfatcion that 
they are cheaper. No doubt, Willie Hearst 
believes those 18,000 men for the Navy can 
just as well be recruited from the threshing 
machine. Three cheers for the Hearst policy. 
Let us man our Merchant Marine with coolies 
and train our naval reserves on the farm. 



Speaking about an American naval reserve 
and the shipping problem in general, Secre- 
tary of the Treasury McAdoo hit the nail on 
the head in his Indianapolis speech. He said: 

If we are to have a naval reserve, it is just 
as essential that we shall have trained American 
seamen as it is to have the vessels themselves. 

Those "American" shipowners who coin 
dividends by the employment of coolie labor 
will most likely disagree with Mr. McAdoo's 
declaration upon this subject. But the great 
mass of disinterested common folks who con- 
stitute the vast majority of our country's pop- 
ulation will heartily concur in such plain, log- 
ical and genuinely patriotic words as were 
uttered by the Secretary of the Treasury. 



ROCKEFELLER'S UNION! 



Views of Leading Thinkers Upon the Effort to 
Substitute Paternalism for Democracy. 



Demand the union label upon all purchases ! 



Samuel Gompers. 
The idea of John D. Rockefeller, Jr., forming 
a labor union of his employes in Colorado was 
held up to ridicule on Monday by President 
Samuel Gompers, of the American Federation 
of Labor. 

"So Mr. Rockefeller has formed a union," said 
Mr. Gompers, — "a union of his employes of his 
Colorado Fuel and Iron Company — and perhaps 
imagines that he has solved the problem of just 
relations between himself and his employes. But 
with all his wealth and all his brains, and all 
the brains that he could buy and suborn, he 
has missed his mark. Imagine an organization 
of miners formed by the richest man in the 
world, who employs its members! What in- 
fluence can such a nseudo union have to insist 
upon the remedying of a grievous wrong or the 
remedying of a real right? And what about 
the representatives of the men, 'sitting around 
the table with Mr. Rockefeller and his angelic- 
representatives out in Colorado, should the 
miners' spokesman have the temerity to insist 
on the rightful demands of the miners?' 

"The miners employed by the Colorado Fuel 
and Iron Company have been whipped, by 
means of atrocious brutality and hunger, into 
submission, back to the mines. And these 
miners have been formed into a union by Mr. 
Rockefeller's benevolent altruism! But he has 
organized them, and for that at any rate labor 
is truly grateful, for when men come together 
to discuss, even in the most cursory way, their 
rights and interests and welfare, there is af- 
forded a splendid field for development and 
opportunity. 

"After what Mr. Rockefeller has done — that 
is, to organize a 'union' of miners in Colorado 
— he should carry his benevolent and practical 
purposes into full execution in all his varied 
industries, and not wait until another massacre 
like that at Ludlow breaks out at one of his 
other industrial institutions. Do not stop at 
Colorado, Organizer Rockefeller!" 
Frank Morrison. 
"The fundamental difference between the 
Rockefeller plan in Colorado and that of trade- 
unions is that the latter develops independence, 
the other relies on the graciousness and good 
will of the employer," said Secretary Frank 
Morrison, of the American Federation of Labor. 
"There can be no compromise between the 
two theories, for if workingmen are to be 
really free their right to regulate their own 
lives must be acknowledged. 

"I am sure that time will demonstrate that 
the plan prepared by Mr. Rockefeller will prove 
a full cousin to the other schemes of like 
character, inaugurated for the sole purpose of 
preventing organizaton of employes that enable 
them to secure improved conditions. 

"Mr. Rockefeller's plan provides that workers 
will be 'permitted' to present grievances. If 
one dissects this theory he says that the power 
that 'permits' can also withdraw any time it 
elects." 

John R. Lawson. 
John R. Lawson, international board member 
of the United Mine Workers of America, who 
is confined in iail in Colorado awaiting the de- 
cision of the Supreme Court on his application 
for a new trial, said that the Rockefeller indus- 
trial plan was not practical. 

"The plan will not prove the factor to pro- 
mote industrial peace in Colorado, because it 
does not contain the essentials of collective bar- 
gaining, but rather attempts to substitute pa- 
ternalism for democracy, or philanthropy for 
justice," he declared. 

"The coal miners of Colorado are not seeking 
charity; they want justice. They are only ask- 
ing the same rights that the officials of the 
Colorado Fuel and Iron Fuel Company claim for 
themselves — the right to ioin the organizaton 
of their choice, which is provided for by 
statute in Colorado. They demand the privilege 
of selling their labor through the medium of 
collective bargaining." 

William Green. 
William Green, secretary of the United Mine 
Workers of America, said that, although John 
D. Rockefeller, Jr., had taken a step in the 
right direction, his plan for the Colorado field 
would full through because of the lack of 
organization. 

"The United Mine Workers of America are 
not a oarty to the plan," added Mr. Green. "In 
fact, there is no organization among the men 
employed in any of the Colorado Fuel and 
Iron Company's mines. The plan submitted 
hv Mr. Rockefeller is between the Colorado 
Fuel and Iron Company and its employees. Mr. 
Rockefeller has not gone far enough." 
Views of Miners' Committee. 
A committee of United Mine Workers of 
America has issued a statement in which they 
practicallv turn down the entire plan of Rocke- 
fellei The statement in nart is: 

"The plan fails to provide for meeting 01 
conventions of the miners exceiit locally, and 
by doing SO insures company domination ol its 
workings. 

"Had the emoloyes of the Colorado Fuel and 
Iron Company been so many children of tender 
(Continued on Page 10.) 







SAILORS' UNION OF THE PACIFIC. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 18, 1915. 

Regular weekly meeting came to order at 7 
p. m., Joe Faltns presiding. Secretary reported 
shipping dull. Full Shipwreck Benefit was 
awarded to six members of the crew of the 
steam-schooner "Mandalay." Nomination of of- 
ficers for the ensuing term was proceeded with. 
JOHN H. TENNISON, Secretary pro tern. 

Maritime Building, 59 Clay St. Phone Kearny 
2228. 



Victoria, B. C, Oct. 13, 1915. 
No meeting. Shipping and prospects .poor. 

REGINALD TOWNSEND, Agent. 
Room 11, De Cosmos Block, 1424 Government 
St. 

Vancouver, B. C, Oct. 13, 1915. 
Shipping and prospects fair. 

W. S. BURNS, Agent. 
213 Hastings St., E. corner of Hastings and 
Main. P. O. Box 1365. Tel. Seymour 8703. 



Tacoma Agency, Oct. 13, 1915. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping dull; pros- 
pects uncertain. 

H. L. PETTERSON, Agent. 
2218 North 30th St. Tel. Main 808. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 13, 1915. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

P. B. GILL, Agent. 
84 Seneca St. P. O. Box 65. Tel. Main 4403. 



Aberdeen Agency, Oct. 13, 1915. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

J. PEARSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 6. Tel. Main 557. 



Portland Agency, Oct. 13, 1915. 
Shipping dull; prospects uncertain. 

JACK ROSEN, Agent. 
44 Union Ave. North. Tel. East 4912. 



Eureka Agency, Oct. 13, 1915. 
No meeting; no quorum. Shipping and pros- 
pects poor. 

OTTO DITTMAR, Agent 
227 First St. P. O. Box 64. Tel. 553. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 13, 1915. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

HARRY OHLSEN, Agent. 
128^ Sepulveda Bldg., Sixth St. P. O. Box 
67. Tel. 137 R. 



Honolulu Agency, Oct. 14, 1015. 
Shipping and prospects poor. 

JACK EDWARDSON, Agent. 
P. O. Box 314. Tel. 2526. 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS* ASSO- 
CIATION OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 



Headquarters, San Francisco, Cal., Oct. 14, 1915. 

Regular weekly meeting was called to order 
at 7 p. m., Eugene Burke in the chair. Secre- 
tary reported shipping slow, plenty of men 
ashore. Two members wrecked on the steam- 
schooner "Mandalay" were ordered paid the full 
Shipwreck Benefit. The report of the delegate 
to the California State Federation of Labor con- 
vention was read and adopted and will be print- 
ed in full in the Coast Seamen's Journal. 

EUGENE STEIDLE, Secretary. 

42 Market St. Phone Kearny 5955. 



Seattle Agency, Oct. 7, L91S. 
Shipping quiet; plenty of men ashore. Mom 
inated officers for the ensuing term. 

LEONARD NORKGAUER, Agent. 
Grand Trunk Dock, Room 203. P. O. Box 214. 
Phone Main 2233. 



San Pedro Agency, Oct. 0, 1915. 
Shipping very dull. Nominated officers for the 
ensuing term. 

HARRY POTHOFF, Agent. 
P. O. Box 54. 



The Rockefeller plan of substituting 
capitalist inspired unionism for the old- 
fashioned trade unionism has the hearty 

endorsement of such tried and true friends 
of Labor as the I .<>s Angeles Times, the 
San Francisco Vrgonaut, etc. If there 

were aiiv doubt about the aim and object 

of the Rockefeller brand of unionism, the 
eulogistic endorsement given by the b 
mentioned labor skinners ought to remove 
it. Rockefeller in the role of an organ- 
izer! What a curious mixture of tra 
and comedy is contained in this ad ! 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



CONDENSED MILK. 



This is truly the age of canned fruits, 
canned vegetables and canned milk. Con- 
venience is the demand of the modern 
householder. She has no use for any 
staple that is not a time-saver. 

No wonder then that the consumption 
of canned milk, the sterilized, evaporated, 
unsweetened condensed milk, has increased 
five-fold in the past few years so that 
at present more than a half billion pounds 
of canned milk is being consumed yearly. 

To be ever-ready is one of the chief 
qualities of every efficient household article. 
Evaporated milk answers this qualification 
immediately. It is always on the larder 
shelf to he used wherever fresh milk can 
be used. 

Especially to seamen has evaporated 
milk been a boon. They indeed were the 
pioneers together with the miner, the 
prospector and the camper. They realized 
the value of evaporated milk long before 
it became a household staple and could be 
found on the shelves of every housekeeper. 

For that reason perhaps the Milk Palace, 
an exhibit of a large condensed milk con- 
cern at the Panama-Pacific International 
Exposition at San Francisco, offered such 
an attraction to them. They indeed fol- 
lowed with close attention every detail of 
evaporation from the time the milk is 
brought into the condensery until the 
labeled can appears. 

When the exposition closes mure than a 
million and a half of people will have 
visited this exhibit, will have watched and 
studied the entire process of evaporating 
milk, will have had an effective demonstra- 
tion that evaporated milk is nothing but 
clean, sweet, pure cow's milk with the 
water extracted through a vacuum process 
and will have been taught the lesson that 
evaporated milk is the only consistently 
safe milk — safe for the baby and safe for the 
grown up. It is safe because it is absolutely 
sterile, bacteria have been eliminated and 
because it is hermetically sealed it can no1 
i piitaminated. 



OIL VERSUS COAL. 



Judge Charles M. Hough has authorized 
P. A. S. Franklin, receiver for the Inter- 
national Mercantile Marine Co., to have 
the steamships "Kroonland" and "Finland" 
converted from coal burners into oil 
burners at a cost of $47,500 each, The 
alterations are to be made by the Robin 
Dry Dock i\: Repair Company. Erie Basin, 
Xew York, and are to be paid For out 
of the funds of the receivership. In the 
same order Receiver Franklin is authorized 
to purchase from Kroeschell Bros. Tee 
Machine Co. new refrigerating machinery 
for the "Kroonland" and "Finland," which 
will cost $12,000 For each ship, to be paid 
for in a similar manner. The conversion 
of the coal burners into oil burners. Re 
ceiver Franklin says, will result in a 
saving of $9,000 for fuel and $3500 for 
wages and Feeding of firemen on each 
round voyage of each ship. The doing 
away with coal bunkers will permit of 
carrying of 1,500 additional tons of cargo, 
at a profit of $25,000 a ship for each trip 
under present freight rates. 



'file size anil value of the coconut indus- 
try in Ceylon may be gaged when it is con 
sidered that fully 60.000.000 coconul 
arc under cultivation. 



THE WORLD-WIDE WAR TRUST, 
i Extract from Congressional Record.) 



United States Senator George T. ( (liver, 
of Pennsylvania, testified before the Sen- 
ate lobby investigation committee that he 
owned 1000 shares of stock in the United 
States Steel Corporation and held a "con- 
siderable" interest in copper mining, lie 
testified he also owned 7700 shares in the 
Pittsburgh Coal Company, and two news- 
papers—the Pittsburgh Gazette-Times and 
the Pittsburgh Chronicle-Telegraph. In- 
creased armament requires greal quantities 
of both copper and coal. 

The United States Steel Corporation is the 
owner of the Carnegie Steel Company, 
which concern has obtained $32,000,000 
worth of contracts from the Navy Depart- 
ment for armor alone, and other millions 
of dollars' worth of contracts for other 
materials used in the increasing of the 
Army and Navy. 

On February 2, 1915, one of Senator 
Oliver's newspapers editorially asked: 

"Hut what is meant by that resounding 
mouthful 'disarmament by the United 
States?' Isn't the fact that the United 
States is pretty well disarmed as matters 
stand? . . . There isn't much sense in 
talking of the United States disarming 
before it is armed." 

Get Ready to Pay in Earnest from Now On. 

Two billion dollars have been collected 
in ten years from the men. women and 
children of our nation for militarism, a 
sum sufficient to dig the Panama Canal. 
pay off the national debt, with enough left 
to defray for one whole year the entire 
expenses of all the churches, including 
foreign mis-ions, all the free schools, col- 
-. and universities in America. 

And the end is not yet. The war 
traffickers have not finished reaping their 
harvest : they are just getting in good trim 
to make us pay the cost of militarism in 
real earnest. American people, listen to 
this little colloquj which occurred recently 
at one of the hearings of the Naval Affairs 
Committee between Representative Finlay 
Cray, of Indiana, and Admiral Vreeland, a 
big Navy booster : 

"Mr. Gray — I wish to inquire of the 
admiral if it is not the policy of other 
Governments to increase their navies with 
all the other leading powers? 

"Admiral Vreeland — It is, sir. 

"Mr. Gray— What would be the ad- 
vantage to us or any other powers if the 
navies were increased equally by all the 
nations of the world? Would there be any 
advantage to us or to any other power? 

"Admiral Vreeland — Not if you mean 
in the same ratio. 

"Mr. Gray — Would not the same grounds 
exist after an increase for a further in- 
crease? 

"Admiral Vreeland— It would seem so. 

"Mr. Gray — There would be no ad- 
vantage gained by any nation, then. How 
Ion- could that be maintained, that even 
increase, and what advantage would it be 
to any nation? 

"Admiral Vreeland — If it continues to in- 
. the poorer nation will eventually 
exhaust itself, and then the other nation-. 
the United States included, will have a 
free band — I mean be free to build in ac- 
cordance with the changed conditions. 

"Mr. Gray— Then it is only a question of 
the limit of taxation ? 



"Admiral Vreeland — Yes. sir." 

In other words, the only thing that the 
international war trust has to fear on the 
score of reduction of profits is the limit of 
the ability of men, women, and children 
to keep on paying the ever and ever in- 
creasing per capita appropriation tax in 
the form of higher prices for foodstuffs 
and wearing apparel. This is certainly a 
bright prospect for the Armor, Powder. 
Battleship, and Ammunition Trusts. But 
for the taxpayers the prospects are not so 
bright. 

If the taxpayers of the world want to 
escape being forced to pay higher and 
higher taxes until they get so high they 
simply can not pay them, there is but one 
thing to do, and that is for the people of 
all the nations to insist that their govern- 
ments manufacture their own munitions of 
war. 

If the millionaire and multimillionaire 
war-trust magnates can not make huge 
profits in supplying the armor, suns. 
powder, and battleships, they will take the 
same attitude toward the wasting of public 
funds that the rest of us do. 



"LET THE GALLED WINCE." 



Editor, Coasi Seamen's Journal: 

The deluge of vituperation which still ob- 
tains circulation in some newspapers of the 
coast, in opposition to the Seamen's Act, and 
which receives vicious support in the Port- 
land "Oregonian." indicates that it is a pav- 
ing investment. 

I will quote numerically from certain issues 
of that paper's venomous tirade: 

1st — "The Seamen's Act will not benefit 
American Seamen." That is a transparent lie. 

2nd- — "Flogging of seamen in the merchant 
service has been abandoned." Lie, number 
two. No law ever was enacted to flog sea- 
men in the merchant service. It was prac- 
ticed in the U. S. Navy, and even there it 
was unconstitutional by the fact that when 
shipping at the rendezvous the recruit was 
liven no information on the subject. 

"'flic shipowners do not want a clause in 
the act compelling them to pay the sailor 
half his wages when in a foreign port, be- 
cause he will go ashore, get drunk and 
:." That ignorant twaddle is ludicrous. 
If a sailor has received half his earnings and 
then deserts, the owner has lost that portion 
and the interest accruing: hut. if he is not 
compelled to pay any portion of the seamen's 
pay. he saves the whole ; hence, the nigger 
in the woodpile. 

4th — "Not many arrests are now made 
for desertion." No; possibly, that is true in 
some ports where the master can get cheaper 
men. 

The slave hunting has been repealed. A 
free flag must cover a free people; all or 
none. No exemption must he made. If a 
seaman is sent to jail for breaking a con- 
tract, and a person on shore under similar 
circumstances is not. then the claim that we 
enjoy freedom and equality under constitu- 
tional law is a farce. Happily the Seamen's 
\ct will do away with inequality. 

"Strange, where can the difference be 
"fwixt tweedle dum and tweedle dee." 1 
in the "Oregonian" of Sept. 23, that it 
maligns the Congress of the United States, 
calling it both cowardly and ignorant. \ 
great amount of ink is also wasted in slurs 
at foreigners, particularly in the Seamen's 
case. 

Tf the new law will prevent certain partic- 












COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



from raising Chinamen for the U. S. Navy, 
it will accomplish an invaluable deed. Evi- 
dently, the "Oregonian" is suffering by proxy. 
The curtain of obscurity is thinly woven. 
Behind the scenes there is wailing and gnash- 
ing of teeth. Were I in sympathy with that 
deceptive propaganda, I would start for 
tears; but I am a seaman of dire and pro- 
longed experience ; consequently, I say, "Let 
the galled jade wince, our withers are un- 
wrung " 

Star Key. 



A HUMAN TYPHOID CARRIER. 



(From University of California.) 



A new and tragic chapter has been writ- 
ten in the history of that famous typhoid- 
carrier, "H. O." 

Twenty-seven sailors on the steam- 
schooner "Acme," plying into San Fran- 
cisco, had been infected with typhoid by 
their shipmate, over a period of four years, 
and four had died, before Dr. W. A. Saw- 
yer, then Director of the State Hygienic 
Laboratory maintained at the University of 
California by the State Board of Health, 
proved that the sailor "H. O." was the in- 
nocent and unsuspecting cause of all these 
disasters. 

In the hope of rendering him no longer a 
menace to the community, the United 
States Marine Hospital authorities treated 
"H. O." with anti-typhoid vaccine, in ten 
doses increasing from twenty-five million to 
fifteen hundred million bacilli. 

Careful examination for four months 
showed no evidence that he was still a car- 
rier, so he was released on parole, and went 
to work as winch-driver on another lumber 
steamer. 

The result — three more cases of typhoid 
fever within three months, and one death. 

Anxious to do anything in human power 
to protect his fellows, "H. O." agreed to 
the removal of his gall-bladder — an opera- 
tion which frequently frees a typhoid-car- 
rier from remaining a danger to other men. 

But the operation, which interfered in no 
way with his health, nevertheless left the 
sailor still a typhoid-carrier. 

For more than two years "H. O." re- 
mained under observation. At first typhoid- 
bacilli could still be found. Then they 
seemed to have disappeared. During four- 
teen months, and through forty-one suc- 
cessive examinations, there were only nega- 
tive results. 

As a specially careful test, Assistant 
Surgeon N. F. Wayson of the United 
States Public Health Service then fed olive 
nil tn "H. O.," on an empty stomach. On 
pumping this out, an hour later, he found 
typhoid bacilli, probably coming from the 
liver. The sailor was still a carrier. All 
this later history of "H. O." is told by. Dr. 
Sawyer, now secretary of the California 
State Board of Health, in a recent article 
in the Journal of the American Medical 
Association, from records made available 
by Surgeon P. N. Woodward, medical offi- 
cer in command of the United States Ma- 
rine Hospital in San Francisco. 

So the calamity which has come upon 
this unfortunate sailor, entirely without 
fault of his own, of being a danger to any 
community of men among whom he might 
work, seems beyond present human skill 
to alter. Himself apparently perfectly 
well, "H. O." -is still a menace of virulent 



infection to others, so he shuts himself up 
in a hospital. 

Of every hundred people who have 
typhoid, two, on the estimated average, 
become typhoid-carriers, permanently or 
temporarily, and links in new endless 
chains of infection. So it behooves every 
community, Dr. Sawyer points out, to pro- 
tect its members against the fearful fate 
of becoming typhoid-carriers by the fol- 
lowing means, toward every one of which 
the California State Board of Health is 
offering hearty aid : 

Good sewage-disposal systems. 

Clean dairies. 

Fly clean-up campaigns. 

Anti-typhoid vaccination. 

Clean water to drink. 



MISSING SHIPS. 



The list (jf vessels posted at Lloyd's as 
missing during the present year is a fairly 
heavy one, although it contains the names 
of but few square-rigged sailers. In March 
last the British four-masted barque "Engel- 
horn," 2294 tons register, was posted, fol- 
lowing about a month later a small coast- 
ing brigantine similarly closed her career. 
A third square-rigger, the "Cap Horn," 
was posted missing September 15. She 
was a Norwegian steel barque of 1517 tons 
register, built at Glasgow in 1896, and is 
reported to have put to sea on January 
27 last from Valparaiso, bound for Moss 
(Norway), and, given average weather, 
she ought to have reached her desination 
in May or June. Her owners were Atkies 
Cap Horn (( ). J. Olsen). Under the name 
of "Nithsdale," she was at one time a 
British ship. The "Cap irorn" is the first 
Norwegian vessel to be posted missing 
this year. The last previous instance in 
which a vessel flying the flag of Norway 
was thus posted was on September 2, 1914, 
when the Norwegian barque "Sumbawa," 
1060 tons register, was declared missing. 
She disappeared with all on board when 
bound from Xew York to La Plata. 



ADMITTED TO U. S. REGISTRY. 



During the period from September 4 to 
October 2, 1915, the Bureau of Navigation 
announces that there were admitted to 
American registry under the Act of August 
18, 1914, three vessels of 35R7 gross tons, 
as follows : 

Gas yacht "Yendys," 7 tons, Irving J. 
Bissell, owner. Grand Haven, Mich.; for- 
merly British steam yacht "Yendys." 

Steamer "Muskegon," 3323 tons, Ameri- 
can Transatlantic Co. (Inc.). Xew York, 
X. Y. ; formerly Danish steamer "Got- 
land." 

Schooner "Albania." 257 tons. William 
Willard Howard. Xew York, X. Y. ; former- 
ly British schooner "(I. M. Cochrane." 
' Total. July 1 to ( )ctober 2. 1915, 17 
vessels, 45,779 gross tons; grand total, 165 
vessels, 560,140 gross tons. 



NOTICE TO SEAMEN. 



The total yield of mine gold in California 
in 1014. as reported by Charles C. Yale, of 
the United States Geological Survey, was 
$20,653,406, an increase of $246,338 over that 
of 1013. With the exception of one year 

1883— the mine gold output ot" the Stale in 
1914 was higher than it has been since 1864, 
50 years ago. 



IMPORTANT. 



Any seaman who finds himself discrimi- 
nated against, either directly or indirectly, 
because of his membership in the Seamen's 
Union (or because of his intention or de- 
sire to join the Union), by any representa- 
tive of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied companies, is requested to 
at once report the facts to an officer of the 
Union. Careful notes should be made, giv- 
ing detailed information of what has oc- 
curred, full names, addresses, date, time, 
place, etc. This will apply to acts of dis- 
crimination against seamen, for above stated 
reasons, or because of rules of the so-called 
"Welfare Plan," by any agent or represent- 
ative of the Lake Carriers' Association or 
any of its allied concerns, including the 
masters and officers of the ships. 
Fraternally yours, 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 
V. A. OLANDER, Secretary. 

LAKE DISTRICT, I. S. U. of A. 



HEADQUARTERS: 

LAKE SEAMEN'S UNION, 

570 West Lake Street, Chicago, III. 

BRANCHES AND AGENCIES: 

BUFFALO, N. Y 55 Main Street 

Telephone Seneca 936 R. 

CLEVELAND. 1401 W. Ninth Street 

Telephone Bell Main 1842. 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 133 Clinton Street 

Telephone South 240. 

ASHTABULA, 21 High Street 

Telephone 552. 

NORTH TONA WANDA, N. Y 152 Main Street 

Telephone Bell 2762. 

DETROIT, MICH 15 Twelfth Street 

Telephone 3724. 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1721 N. Third Street 

Telephone, New, Broad 385. 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 

OGDENSBLIRG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

CONNEAUT, 922 Day Street 

SOUTH CHICAGO, ILL 9142 Mackinaw Avenue 

PORT HURON, MICH 517 Water Street 

ERIE, PA 107 E. Third Street 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS' BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION. 

HEADQUARTERS: 

71 Main Street, Buffalo, N. Y. 

Telephone Seneca 48. 

BRANCHES: 

CLEVELAND, 1185 W. Eleventh Street 

CHICAGO, ILL 445 LaSalle Avenue 

MILWAUKEE, WIS 151 Reed Street 

DETROIT, MICH 27 Jefferson Ave., East 

SUPERIOR, WIS 1814 Fourth Street 

OGDENSBURG, N. Y 70 Isabella Street 

BAY CITY, MICH 108 Fifth Avenue 



MARINE COOKS AND STEWARDS' UNION. 

HEADQUARTERS: 
406 N. Clark St., Chicago, III. 
Telephone Main 365. 
BRANCHES: 
Buffalo, N. Y. Toledo, O. 

Cleveland, O. North Tonawanda, N. Y. 

Milwaukee, Wis. Superior, Wis. 

Ashtabula. O. Erie, Pa. 



Demand the union label upon ah purchases! 



UNITED STATES MARINE HOSPITAL AND RE- 
LIEF STATIONS ON THE GREAT LAKES. 

MARINE HOSPITALS: 

CHICAGO, ILL. DETROIT, MICH., CLEVELAND, O. 



RELIEF 
Ashland, Wis. 

Ashtabula Harbor, O. 
Buffalo, N. Y. 
Duluth, Minn. 
iaba, Mich. 

i Haven, Mich. 
Green Hay. Mich. 
i [oughton, Mich. 
Ludlngton, Mich. 
Manistee, Mich. 

Pa. 
M :,uinlnee, Mich. 



STATIONS: 
< igdensburg, N. v 
Oswego, N. Y. 
Port i lui on, Mich 
Manitowoc, wis. 
Marquette, Mich. 
Milwaukee, wis. 
Saginaw, Mich 

Sandusky. O. 

Sault Bte. Marie 
Sheboj Kan, w la 
Superior, wis. 
Toledo, O. 



Mi.li 



10 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



WEEKLY NEWS LETTER. 
(Continued from Page 3.) 



more than 500 graduate students, mature 
men and women, who are here to do 
serious study and investigation. 

"As graduate students, expecting to 
Spend our lives in tine pursuit of study and 
rcli along the lines in which we are 
now specializing, we regard the freedom 
of speech of our instructors as of first 
importance. As a basis for future research. 
it i- essential that we he familiarized with 
every important school of thought, no mat- 
ter how new or how contrary to current 
preconceptions it may he. Professors, 
therefore, must he wholly free, after care- 
ful study and analysis, to tell the truth as 
they themselves see it. 

•'Recent events have lent color to a grow- 
ing suspicion which has gained the widest 
currency, especially in academic circles, 
during the last few months, that only in 
those fields of learning which are removed 
from the consideration of present-day so- 
cial and industrial conditions could instruc- 
tors in the (Jniversitj of Pennsylvania ex- 
press their honest opinions without fear of 
consequences, while in the economic, so- 
cial and political sciences, instructors could, 
with safety, promulgate only the doctrines 
pleasing to one class. 

"The currency of such an idea lessens for 
us as students the value of our associations 
with the University of Pennsylvania and 
greatly impairs a degree from this institu- 
tion." 



Canadian Unionists Watching Labor Law. 

Canadian trade unionists are showing no 
inclination to accept certain amendments 
to the industrial disputes act. which was 
intended to further conciliation and arbi- 
tration between employer and employe. 
The act now applies to public utilities and 
mining and also where both sides accept 
its provisions. 

Under the act the Government, together 
with employer and employe, appoint rep- 
resentatives on a hoard that investigates dis- 
putes and it is unlawful to enforce a strike 
or lockout pending this investigation. 

The Government now proposes to extend 
the act to include other industries and the 
plan is opposed as follows by the Indus- 
trial Banner of Toronto: 

"The feeling is generally prevalent among 
the workers in callings outside of public 
utility enterprises that they have no desire 
or inclination to be covered by the indus- 
trial disputes act, and many of them be- 
lieve it would be to their decided disad- 
vantage. 

"Several big organizations have a system 
of settling their disputes by a system of 
impartial arbitration, as, for instance, the 
Boot and Shoe Workers and the Typo- 
graphical Union. To bring such organiza- 
tions under the act would be neither neces- 
sary or advantageous, and would undoubt- 
edly be warmly resented upon their part. 

"Under these circumstances organized 
labor must be ready to assume a watchful 
attitude, determined to scrutinize and weigh 
everv change that it is proposed to make 
in the present law, for there are so many 
bad clauses in it that the Minister of La- 
bor has apparently no intention of improv- 
ing, that the workers have a perfect right 
to be somewhat doubtful of any proposed 
tinkering with it. 

"It is worthy of note that up to the pres- 



ent time no employer has ever been called 
upon to suffer for an> act committed upon 
his part, either for wantinly aggressive acts 
or the violation >->\ any contract with em- 
ployes, but in man}' cases the law has been 
invoked, unjustly, we believe, to penalize 
the workers, fully bearing out the predic- 
tions that were made by the Industrial 
Banner when the measure first became law. 
"Honestly speaking, dissatisfaction with 
the present industrial disputes act has been 
steadily growing upon the part of trades 
unionists, who have had to suffer because 
of its many defects, it apparently being a 
net that is so elastic that it allows tin 
plover who really does offend to escape 
while it enmeshes the luckless workers 
whom it holds secure." 



Teachers Again Attacked. 

The Chicago Hoard of Education, which 
was recently ordered to refrain front en- 
forcing its anti-union rule against mem- 
bers of the Teachers' federation, has 
passed another resolution which, it is hoped, 
will overcome Judge O'Connor's objection 
to their trade-union antagonism. Members 
of the board believe that with the change 
they will have an easier time in their tight 
to gain a dissolution of the injunction in a 
higher court. 

Judge O'Connor held that the first reso- 
lution passed by the board included mem- 
bership in the National Education Associa- 
tion, the Illinois State Teachers* "Vss 
tion and the pension fund. 

To remove this objection, the board is 
forced to take a positive stand, and declare. 
by the following change, that the fight is 
solely a denial of the ri^ht of teachers to 
join a trade union : 

"Membership by teachers in labor unions 
or in organizations .if teachers affiliated 
with a trade union or a federation or asso- 
ciation of trade unions is inimical to prop- 
er discipline, prejudicial to the efficiency of 
the teaching force, and detrimental to the 
welfare of the public school system; there- 
fore such membership or affiliation is here- 
by prohibited, as well as teachers' organ- 
izations which have officers, business agents, 
or other representatives who are not mem- 
bers of the teaching; force." 



"Eastland" Was Mismanaged. 

"The 'Eastland' tipped over becaust 
improper ballast and improper manage- 
ment. There is no mystery about the ac- 
cident, which simply shows up the typical 
American careless and irresponsible meth- 
ods, also the typical American disregard of 
technical analysis and reliance on the 
motto on the silver dollar. 'In God we 
trust.' " 

The above statements were made by An- 
drew Allen, a mining engineer, in a recent 
address before the Engineers' Club at Chi- 
cago. The speaker was also a member of 
the State Grand Jury. lie ridiculed the 
theory that piling in the river caused the 
ship to turn over and cause the death of 
812 excursionists last July. lie declared 
that "the piling would have sunk into the 
mud or dented the bottom." 

The mining engineer said the boat should 
not have been permitted to carry more 
than 1700 or 1800 persons, if nine square 
feet for each passenger was allowed. This 
ride was ignored and the boat was al- 
lowed to carry 2500. 

"There were 2412 tickets turned in by 
the Transportation company." said the 



speaker. "Out of 500 tickets examined we 
found 152 coupons held by passengers who 
were not on the "Eastland," for which 
there were no tickets turned in. This 
would suggest that many tickets had been 
destroyed and that there must have been 
25 to 30 per cent, more passengers on the 
boat than reported. 

"On the morning of the accident the 
ballast tanks were pumped dry. When the 
boat listed to starboard they started to till 
the port tanks. When it began to list to 
port, the) began to pump out the port 
tanks instead of filling the starboard tanks. 
too; in fact, this was attempted only at 
the last moment. The ballast tanks were, 
therefore, only partially tilled and the water 
could surge with every movement of the 
boat. The instability was doubtless in- 
creased instead of decreased thereby. The 
single ballast tank system is very defec- 
tive and when the boat began to get away 
from the crew they had no means of right- 
ing it. 

"There is no mystery about the accident. 
It is a thing that might have happened, 
and almost did happen many times before. 
It is a thing that is bound to happen soon- 
er or later in a boat operated as was the 
"Eastland." 



ROCKEFELLER'S UNION! 
(Continued from page 7.) 



age, tin paternal control they seek to exercise 
through the medium of the 'plan' would be 
proper; to grown men "f independent thought 
it cannot lu- other than repugnant. 

"A certain degree of social betterment is i 

I r substitute for the privileges that ran only 

he secured through industrial democracy and 
collective action on the part of the wage 
workers." 

"The Public," of Chicago. 

John M. Rockefeller, Jr.. is giving another 
demonstration of the truth of Tolstoy's pathetic 
words: "The rich are willing to <h> anything 
for the i" i't to get off their hacks." 

Is it not passing strange that an intelligent 
American, who knows the history of the struggle 
against tyranny should attempt to re-establish 
it in this country Will it he any more toler- 
able when accomplished by largesses? Will the 
chains he less galling, though covered with 
velvet? The new social machinery that Mr. 

feller is setting up may work well o 
at first. There may follow an era of 
Feeling after he has returned to his home, two 
thousand miles distant. But that whole ma- 
chinerj will lie in the hands of men who have 
the arbitrary power to say "yes" and "no," 
without appeal. Living conditions in the camp 
may he bettered; there may be shorter hours 
and better pay. and so long as the mass of the 
men are fresh from Europe, where only tyranny 
is known, there may be peace and contentment, 
lint free men are -< i f-w illed. They grow im- 
patient at dictation. And those accustomed to 
bow to another's will in Europe become restless 
in free America. So bum as any man with a 
grievance knows that the dispute between him- 
self and his fellow ran be decided bv his fellow 
lie will be dissatisfied, even though he knows 
the decision to be just. He will never rest un- 
til he has reached the plane of equality. 

\s an individual citizen and neighbor, Mr. 
i feller's kindness of heart is most praise- 
worthy: but as a holder of special privileges, his 

offer of benevolence in place of justice will 
be futile. " Association in equality is the law of 
progress." There is no substitute. 



AFTER FIFTY YEARS. 



In the fiscal year ended June 30 last the 
Cxovcrnmcnt paid to civil war pensioners 
more than $156,000,000. This was, how- 
ever, a substantial decrease, as the pay- 
ments for the preceding year were $172.- 
417.546. Since the civil war ended pay- 
ments to pensioners have aggregated 
C4 6i4.o43.2o7. The number of pensioners 
on the rolls at the end of June was 33,255 
less than a vear before. 



For fair products of all kinds consult the 
Tournai-'s ad columns. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



11 



WOMEN WHO TOIL ON FARMS. 



Our Government never faced so tremen- 
dous a problem as that now lying dormant 
at the doors of Congress and the Legisla- 
tures, and which, when aroused, will shake 
this nation from center to circumference, 
and make civilization hide its face in shame. 
That problem is — women in the field. 

The last Federal census reports show we 
now have 1,514,000 women working in the 
field, most of them south of the Mason and 
Dixon line. There were approximately a 
million negro slaves working in the fields 
when liberated by the emancipation procla- 
mation. We have freed our slaves and our 
women have taken their places in bondage. 
We have broken the shackles off the ne- 
groes and welded them Upon our daughters. 

A million women in bondage in the 
Southern fields form the chain-gang of civ- 
ilization — the industrial tragedy of the age. 
There is no overseer quite so cruel as that 
oi unrestricted greed, no whip that stings 
like the lash of suborned destiny, and no 
auctioneer's block quite so revolting as that 
of organized avarice. 

The President of the United States was 
recently lauded by the press, and very prop- 
erly so, for suggesting mediation between 
the engineers and railroad managers in ad- 
justing their schedule of time and pay. The 
engineers threatened to strike if their wages 
were not increased from approximately ten 
t'i eleven dollars per day and service re- 
duced from ten to eight hours and a sim- 
ilar readjustment of the overtime schedule. 
( Mn- women are working in the field, many 
of them barefooted, for less than 50 cents 
per day, and their schedule is the rising 
sun and the evening star, and after the 
day's work is over they milk the cows, slop 
the hogs and rock the baby to sleep. Is 
anyone mediating over their problems and 
to whom shall they threaten a strike? 

Congress has listened approvingly to 
those who toil at the forge and behind the 
counter, and many of our statesmen have 
smiled at the threats and have fanned the 
flame of unrest among industrial laborers. 
Rut women are as surely the final victims 
of industrial warfare as they are the bur- 
den-bearers in the war between nations, and 
those who arbitrate and mediate the differ- 
ences between capital and labor should not 
forget that when the expenses of any in- 
dustry are unnecessarily increased, society 
foots the bill by drafting a new consign- 
ment of women from the home to the field. 

No financial award can be made without 
someone footing the bill, and we commend 
to those who accept the responsibility of 
the distribution of industrial justice, the 
still small voice of the woman in the field 
as she pleads for mercy, and we beg that 
they pinch no crumb from her crust of 
bread or put another patch upon her ragged 
garments. 

We beg that they listen V i the scream of 
horror from the eagle on every American 
dollar that is wrung from the brow of toil- 
ing women and hear the Goddess of Jus- 
tice hiss at a verdict that increases the 
want of woman to satisfy the greed of 
man. 

The women behind the counter and in 
the factory cry aloud for sympathy and the 
press thunders out in their defense and the 
pulpit pleads for mercy, but how about the 
woman in the field? Will not these power- 
ful exponents 'of human rights turn their 



talent, energies and influence to her relief? 
Will the Goddess of Liberty enthroned at 
Washington told the calloused hand and 
soothe the feverish brow of her sex who 
sows and reaps the nation's harvest or will 
she permit the male of the species to shove 
women — weak and weary — from the bread- 
line of industry to the back alleys of pov- 
erty? 

The census enumerators tell us that of 
the 1,514,000 women who work in the fields 
as farm hands, 400.000 are 16 years of age 
and under. What is the final destiny of a 
nation whose future mothers spend 
their girlhood days behind the plow, pitch- 
ing hay and hauling manure, and what is 
to become of womanly culture and refine- 
ment that grace the home, charm society 
and enthuse men to leap to glory in noble 
achievements if our daughters are raised in 
the society of the ox and the companion- 
ship of the plow? 

In that strain between the ages of 16 
and 45 are 050,000 women working as farm 
hands and many of them with suckling 
babes tugging at their breasts, as drenched 
in perspiration, they wield the scythe and 
guide the plow. What is to become of that 
nation where poverty breaks the crowns of 
the queens of the home; despair hurls a 
mother's love from its throne and hunger 
drives innocent children from the school- 
room to the hoe? 

The census bureau shows that 155,000 of 
these women are 45 years of age and over. 
There is no more pitiful sight in civilization 
than these saintly mothers of Israel stooped 
with age. drudging in the field from sun un- 
til sun, and at night drenching their dingy 
pillows with the tears of despair as their 
aching hearts take it all to God in prayer. 
Civilization strikes them a blow when it 
should give them a crown, and their only 
friend is He who broke bread with beggars 
and said : "Come unto me all ye that are 
weary and heavy laden and T will give you 
rest." 

Oh, America! The land of the free and 
the home of the brave, the world's cus- 
todian of chivalry, the champion of human 
rights and the defender of the oppressed — 
shall we permit our maidens . fair to be 
torn from the hearthstone by the ruthless 
hand of destiny and chained to the plow? 
Shall we permit our faithful wives whom 
we covenanted with God to cherish and 
protect, to be hurled from the home to the 
harvest field, and our mothers dear to be 
driven from the old arm chair to the cot- 
ton patch? 

In rescuing our citizens from the forces 
of civilization, can we not apply to our fair 
Dixieland the rule of the sea — "women and 
children first ?" 

There must be a readjustment of the 
wage scale of industry so that the women 
can be taken from the field or given a rea- 
sonable wage for her services. Perhaps the 
issue has never been fairly raised, but the 
Farmers' Union, with a membership of ten 
million, puts its organized forces squarely 
behind the issue and we now enter upon 
the docket of civilization the case of "The 
Woman in the Field," and demand an im- 
mediate trial. — Peter Rudford. 



Labor's Economic Platform 



What is said to be the largest smelter in 
the world is being constructed in this country 
for operation in Belgian Congo. 



Demand the union label upon ah purchases 



Following is the Economic Platform adopted 
by the American Federation of Labor: 

1. The abolition of all forms of involuntary 
servitude, except as a punishment for crime. 

2. Free schools, free text books and compul- 
sory education. 

3. Unrelenting protest against the issuance 
and abuse of injunction process in labor disputes 

4. A work day of not more than eight hours 
in the twenty-four hour day. 

5. A strict recognition of not over eight hours 
per day on all Federal, State or municipal work, 
and not less than the prevailing per diem wage 
rate of the class of employment in the vicinity 
where the work is performed. 

6. Release from employment one day in 
seven. 

7. The abolition of the contract system on 
public work. 

8. The municipal ownership of public utilities. 

9. The abolition of the sweat-shop system. 
ID. Sanitary inspection of factory, workshop, 

mine and home. 

11. Liability of employers for injury to body 
or loss of life. 

12. The nationalization of telegraph and tele- 
phone. 

13. The passage of anti-child labor laws in 
States where they do not exist and rigid de- 
fense of them where they have been enacted 
into law. 

14. Woman suffrage co-equal with man suf- 
frage. 

15. Suitable and plentiful playgrounds for 
children in all cities. 

16. The Initiative and Referendum and the 
Imperative Mandate and Right of Recall. 

17. Continued agitation for the public bath 
system in all cities. 

18. Qualification in permits to build of all 
cities and towns, that there shall be bathrooms 
and bathroom attachments in all houses or com- 
partments used for habitation. 

19. We favor a system of finance whereby 
money shall be issued exclusively by the Govern- 
ment, with such regulations and restrictions as 
will protect it from manipulation by the banking 
interests for their own private gain. 

DnnDnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnDnnnnnnDannnn 

International Seamen's Union 
of America 



(Continued from Page 5.) 



MARINE FIREMEN, OILERS AND WATER- 
TENDERS OF THE PACIFIC. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 58 Commercial St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., 1408% Western Ave., P. O. Box 
875. 

PORTLAND, Ore., 242 Flander St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., 613 Beacon St., P. O. Box 574. 



MARINE COOKS' AND STEWARDS' ASSOCIATION 
OF THE PACIFIC COAST. 

Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 42 Market St. 

Branches: 
SEATTLE, Wash., Pier No. 1, Room 63. P. O. 
Box 214. 

PORTLAND, Ore., Room 10, Bickle BIdg., 27V4 
Second St. 

SAN PEDRO, Cal., P. O. Box 64. 



ALASKA FISHERMEN'S UNION. 
Headquarters: 
SAN FRANCISCO, Cal., 49 Clay St. 

Agencies: 
BEATTLE, Wash., 84 Seneca St., P. O. Rnx 42. 
ASTORIA, Ore., P. O. Box 138. 

DDDnnnnnDnDDnnDnnDDnnnnDnnnnDDDDnn 

The Coast Seamen's Journal 

Can be procured !>v seamen at 

any of the above-mentioned places; 

at the headquarters of the 

Federated Seamen's Union of Australasia 

29 ERSKINE STREET, SYDNEY, N. S. W. 



COAST SEAMEN'S JOURNAL 



Labor 


N 


ews. 





SEATTLE, WASH. 



\liout 150 members of Upholster- 
ers' Union 37, of Boston, Mass., have 
on strike to secure a 50-fiour 
week. They demand that the firms 
involved sign an agreement that they 
wilt not in dull periods take away 
privileges gained by the strikers. 

The -trike at the New Departure 
Manufacturing Company of Bristol, 
Conn., was settled when the em- 
ployes voted to accept a compro- 
mise offer made by the company of 
a 50-hour week, with ?/'_• hours' pay. 
The 1600 employes have returned to 
work. 

The raincoat makers of Cleveland, 
Ohio, held a fine meeting to discuss 
the question of organizing, arid as a 
result the entire number signed the 
charter application. Organizer Solo- 
mon sent in the document, and it 
bore the names of three-fourths of 
all the raincoat makers in the city. 

The Pawtucket, R. I., steam-litters 
who have been on strike for a week- 
have returned to work following an 
agreement made with their employers 
to the effect that they finish existing 
contracts at the old wage rate and 
that on subsequent contracts they re- 
ceive 50 cents a day additional, ma- 
king $4 a day. 

The strike of Chicago painters, the 
last of the building trade troubles 
which began last spring, has ended 
with a substantial victory for the 
union. A three-year agreement has 
been entered into which provides for 
a union shop, arbitration and a 72"X 
cents per hour wage in the last year 
of the agreement. More than 10,000 
men are affected by the settlement. 

All station agents and telegraphers 
employed by the Wabash Railroad 
system will receive salary increases 
of nine per cent., beginning with 
November 1, it was announced at 
the executive offices of the road. In 
addition the working day of station 
agents will be reduced from twelve 
to ten hours and telegraphers will 
work eight hours a day. Overtime 
pay will be increased from twenty- 
live to thirty-five cents an hour. The 
new schedule will increase the pay- 
roll by $40,000 annually. 

Judge Paul Little of Fort Smith, 
Ark., has declared the minimum 
wage law for women unconstitutional. 
A laundry proprietor who had been 
found guilty in a justice's court took 
an appeal to the circuit court, with 
the result noted. State officials an- 
nounce they will appeal the case to 
the State Supreme Court. The law 
was passed by the last Legislature, 
and was intended "to regulate the 
hours of labor, safeguard the health 
and establish a minimum wage foT 
females in the State of Arkansas." 

Light thousand men are now in- 
volved in the strike at Clifton, Mor- 
enci and Metcalf, Ariz., against the 
Detroit Copper Company, the Ari- 
zona Copper Company and the Sher- 
man Copper Company. The elec- 
tricians, machinists and boilermakers 
have joined the miners. The strike 
resulted from the organization of a 
Western Federation of Miners' Union 
in the camps and the refusal of op- 
erators to deal with its representa- 
tives. The strike has closed the 
mines of the Arizona and Detroit 
companies at Morenci and the mines 
of the Arizona and Shannon com- 
pany at Metcalf, also the smelters of 
the Shannon and Arizona Company 
at Clifton, the smelter of the- I » « 
troit Company at Morenci and the 
concentrators of the Detroit and Ari- 
zona companies at Morenci. 



Office Phone 
Elliott 135 



MARSHALL'S 

NAVIGATION SCHOOL 

DAY AND NIGHT 

Up-to-date methods in Modern Navigation and Nautical Astronomy. 

Compasses adjusted. 

PIER NO 1. Established 1890 SEATTLE, WASH. 



THE HUB 

Shoe and Clothing Company 

UNION MADE HEAD TO FOOT 
OUTFITTERS 

615-617 First Ave. Opp. Totem Pole 
SEATTLE, WASH. 

^ALASKA HOTEL 

CORNER WESTERN AVENUE AND 

SENECA STREET 

New Building— New Furniture 

26 cents and up per Day 

Special Rates Per Week 

FREE BATHS 

PETER DESMORE, Proprietor 

SEATTLE 



DANIEL LANDON 

Attorney and Proctor in Admiralty 

1055 Empire Building 

Second Ave. and Madison St. 

Seattle, Wash. 



Union Store 

Best Line of Men's Suits 

Overcoats, Raincoats, Shoes, Hats 

and Men's Furnishings 

CARL SCHERMER 

103-107 First Avenue South 
Near Yesler Way SEATTLE 



Seattle, Wash., Letter List. 



Under a rule adopted by the Seattle 
Postoffice, letters addressed In care of 
the Sailors' XTnlon Agency at Seattle can 
not be held longer than 30 days from 
date of delivery. If members are unable 
to call or have their mail forwarded 
during that period, they should notify 
the Agent to hold mail until arrival. 

Abrahamsen, Halp- Lawson, J. J. 

tan I ""el 

Andersen. Hjulmar Lundgren. F. 

Andersen, Alfred Mjones, John 



Pho:ie Main 1202 

L. V. WESTERMAN 

CLOTHIER 

FURNISHER and HATTER 

ALASKA OUTFITTER 



220-222 First Avenue South, 
SEATTLE 



at Main 



BONNEY-WATSON CO. 

FUNERAL DIRECTORS AND 

EMBALMERS 

Private Ambulance Service 

Crematory and Columbarium In 

Connection 

Broadway at Olive St. East 13 



Eureka, Cal. 



MERCANTILE LUNCH 

Is the place for a good and quick service 

233 Second Street, Eureka, Cal. 

Teddy S Hagan 

Proprietor* 



^^^>^^^^A^^^S^N^S^S^ , WN^^WVW^W*'W ^^^ 



SMOKE 



The "Popular Favorite," the "Little 
Beauty," the "Princess" and other 
high grade union-made cigars. 

Manufactured by 

C. O'CONNOR 

612 Fourth St. - - Eureka, Cal. 



CITY SODA WORKS 

DELANEY & YOUNQ 

Manufacturers of all kinds of Soda, 
Cider, Syrups, Sarsaparllla and Iron, Etc. 
Sole agents for Jackson's Napa Soda. 
Also bottlers and dealers In Enterprise 
Lager Beer. 

318 F STREET, EUREKA, CAL. 



Andersen, Albln 

-1388 
Brower, Geo. 
Bucknam, J. W. 
Berg, Fred 
Brown, D. C. 

nsen, Anton 



Moyer, Win. 

isen, ingoald 
Martlnsohn, l '. a. 
Mathlsen, Sigurd . 

Moore. ('. R. 
Mattson, Brick 
Mattson, J. -1328 



Chrlstensen, Albert Mlkkelsen, A. W. 



Donovan. J. 
Dougherty, J. 
I lyrnes, L. E. 
Edvords, John 
Eggers. John 
Engebretsen, Ed. 
Edson, Frank 
Endresen. Marlus 
Eugen. T. 
Fenes. I. 
Pa rridane, P. 
Olademo, Lars 
Oundersen, Peter 
Gustafson, Karl 
Grant, Dave 
Hansen, Alex M. 
Hansen, John 
Hansen, Olaf 
Unnsen. E. - 1 1-17 
Hill. C. 
Hemes, K. 



Morgan, w 
Nass, T. m 
Newland, Ernest 
Nelson, Axe] 

Nordstr E. V. 

Nevlin, Georg 
Olson, .1. E. 
Ona, Sam 
Petersen, A. -1 

Bon, Harry 
l '. terson, I fans 
Pederson, Carl 
rson, Carl 
Peterson. Carl 
Qualns, Nick 

nberg. Barm 
Rosen wald. teach 
Ruiter, J. 
s hw lol jn v. 
Shankat, I 
S 1 m m in gh 



Jakobson, Waldemar Speller, Henn 
Jorgensen, Fred Salvesen, Salve 



Johanson, Wm 

■n. Johan 
.Johnson. Andrew 
Johnson. Ernest 
Johnson, P. M. 
Johnson, Ole 
Johnson. Jorge!] 
.lunge, H. 
Kilning, Jacob 
Karen. J. 
Karlson, Ingvald 
Krager. Johan 
Kressman. Karl 
L;irsen. Alhin 
Larsen. Olaf 

id. John 
Lindeman, C. 11. O. 



onard 
Seppol.i, Emil 
Seliken, H. 
Sinclair, Emanuel 
Smith. T. 
Swensen, Jorsren 
Strandevus. Jack 
Bverd, C P 
Telchert Karl 
Thomsen. Einar 
Torjusen, G. T. 

ii. 
Vick, Tom 

W.-.-l) 

■\Venneeke. A. 
Wick, I. 



Tacoma Letter List. 

Cords, W. A. Olsen. Martin E. 

Evertsen, Olof Paterson, John 

Farrell. William Person. Fritz Leo- 

Haugan, Arthur nard 
Johannsen. ChristianSehmidt. Louis 

Linea, W. Thomas. Paul 

Line, Wictor TTlIman, Emll 
Murphy, Danial 



When making purchases from our 
advertisers, always mention the Coast 
Seamen's Journal. 



PUGET SOUND 

NAUTICAL SCHOOL 

Conducted by CAPTAIN H. S. 8MITH 

Four years Assistant Inspector of Steam- 
boats, Puget Sound District. Formerly 
Instructor In New York Nautical College. 

Room 4187 ARCADE BUILDING 

Next Room to Masters, Mates and Pilots 

Association 

SEATTLE, WASH. 





K. 


K. 


TVETE 






Dealer in 


Clothing, 


Shoes 
Gents' 


Hats and 
Furnishing Goods 




108 


-110 MAIN STREET 


Squ 


re- Latimer Block, Seattle, Wash. 



VV^l^AAAAVVVVV»VVVV^ l rVV^A^ l A^»^lVVVVVVV« 



INFORMATION WANTED. 



Carl Kristianson, who shipped on 
the bark "Nuanu" in September, 

1912, from Honolulu to San Pedro, 
was on the bark "Allen" and 
schooner "Repeat" previously. Any- 
body knowing his whereabouts please 
notify his mother, Mrs. Anna Kris- 
tianson, Majornas, Route 6, M. 27, 
Lilla B. Nystrama St., Gothenborg, 
Sweden. 5-13-14 

Frank Melson, who went as fire- 
man on the S. S. "Maye" from Phila- 
delphia to New Orleans, in May, 

1913, is inquired for by his mother. 
Anyone knowing his whereabouts 
please notify Mrs. G. W. Paruin, 
4309 Westminster avenue, W. Phila- 
delphia, Pa. 

George Barrett, who, on November 
12, 1912, left the ship "Port Logan" 
at Newcastle, of which he was an 
apprentice, is inquired for by his 
mother, his father having died. Any- 
one knowing the whereabouts of this 
lost son please at once communi- 
cate with Amelia Barrett, 1 Wood- 
land Place, East Greenwich, Lon- 
don, England. 3-3-15 

Otto E. Bickel and John Sherman 
Bickel, brothers, who have not been 
heard of for many years, are in- 
quired for by their sister. They are 
both tall, light complexioned, and blue 
eyes. Any information regarding 
their whereabouts will be highly ap- 
preciated. Please address Miss Laura 
Bickel, 1591 East Ninety-third street, 
Cleveland, Ohio. 4-14-15 

Fred Riley, a colored seaman, last 
heard from at Genoa, Italy, and at 
other times from ports in Australia 
and at Liverpool, England, is sole 
heir to his mother's estate. Anyone 
knowing his whereabouts kindly no- 
tify Mr. John E. Selkirk, Attorney- 
at-Law, 100 Erie Co. Bank Bldg., 
Buffalo, N. Y. 6-24-14 



— For — 

A GOOD CUP OF COFFEE 

— or — 

A SQUARE MEAL 

— Try — 
EUREKA CHOP HOUSE 

Cor. Second and D Sts., Eureka, Cal. 
A. R. ABRAHAMSEN, Prop. 



SAILORS' OUTFITTERS 

CLOTHING, SHOES, HATS, 
SAILORS' SINGLETS 

Everything Union Made 

PAGE & SCHWARTZ 

Cor. Second and E Sts., Eureka, Cal. 



^VV^WWVWWWWWWWWW^VWW«^ 



SEAMEN'S HEADQUARTER8 

THE COSMOPOLITAN 

Furnished Rooms, Club Rooms. Bil- 
liard and Pool Tables, Reading Room 
with latest Swedish, Finn and Nor- 
wegian newspapers. 

BARBER SHOP 
125 D. St., Eureka, Cal. 

ED. 8WANSON, Prop. 



Eureka, Cal., Letter List 

Contreras, Julio Lawrence, Harry 

Eriksen, Anton fomas, Richard 

Kyrkalatt, Lars Nilsen. Nils 

M i. -Keating, R. Thorsen, Fredriek N. 



INFORMATION WANTED. 

Johan Hilmar Hansen, a seaman 
who was last heard from in Seattle, 
Wash., in 1911, is inquired for by his 
father, Anton Hansen, Nygaten 34, 
Moss, Norway. 5-13-14 

Alex McDonald, formerly of Dun- 
dee, Scotland, who has not been 
heard of for 22 years, but is thought 
to be sailing on the Pacific Coast, 
is inquired for by Jas. Perry, 30 
Bridge End, Buckpool, Buckie, Eng